Tesco removes all traces of plastic from its online shopping service

The largest supermarket in Great Britain stops using plastic carrier bags for online shopping.

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Tesco hopes to remove 250 million bags a year from homes and bins, as well as the two tons of plastic used for their production.

The decision is the most recent in a long list of measures across the street to cut down on plastic bags and single-use packaging.

Asda also promised last week to remove plastic carrier bags that it uses for online orders to remove tens of millions of bags.

Everything helps: Tesco's decision to roll out deliveries without courier bags follows 28 weeks of successful trials with 33 stores, reducing their carbon footprint

Everything helps: Tesco's decision to roll out deliveries without courier bags follows 28 weeks of successful trials with 33 stores, reducing their carbon footprint

HOW DOES IT WORK?

The Icelandic store in Hackney goes without a plastic bag. Instead, shoppers will be offered a sturdy, reusable paper carrier for 15 p per item.

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It offers paper bags separately, in addition to plastic bags for life, at 40 other points of sale.

Tesco's plan to remove plastic bags ensures that the groceries are delivered in reusable bins that are removed.

Drivers & # 39; s are available to help customers unpack items if desired.

Boots dumps plastic bags from all its stores and will instead offer bags made from unbleached paper.

More than 40 companies and 15 other organizations, including all major supermarkets, have committed to make major changes to the UK Plastics Pact.

Iceland today announces its first plastic bag-free store in London in a trial that is part of its leading strategy to cut plastic from all its own label products by 2023.

The Tesco plan to remove plastic bags ensures that the groceries are delivered in reusable bins, which are removed. Drivers & # 39; s are available to help customers unpack items if desired.

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The decision to roll out courier-free deliveries follows 28 weeks of successful trials with 33 stores.

The law means that Tesco will continue to supply small red bags to separate raw meat and fish – plus cleaning products in England – after the change came into effect on August 19. Customers can ensure that they are recycled by returning them to their delivery person.

Sarah Bradbury of Tesco said: "We are looking for ways to reduce the amount of plastic we use.

& # 39; We know it is a major problem for customers, colleagues & our company and we know we have to do more.

& # 39; Removing carrier bags from our online shopping is one of the many ways we make changes to help customers reduce their use of plastic.

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"We are currently viewing all our packaging, including plastic, to remove them wherever possible. Where it is not appropriate to remove, we will reduce this, help customers reuse and ensure that all packaging can be recycled.

& # 39; Our scale means that a simple, simple change can have such a big impact. & # 39;

The Tesco plan to remove plastic bags ensures that the groceries are delivered in reusable bins, which are removed. Drivers & # 39; s are available to help customers unpack items if desired

The Tesco plan to remove plastic bags ensures that the groceries are delivered in reusable bins, which are removed. Drivers & # 39; s are available to help customers unpack items if desired

The Tesco plan to remove plastic bags ensures that the groceries are delivered in reusable bins, which are removed. Drivers & # 39; s are available to help customers unpack items if desired

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The charity organization for nature conservation, WWF-UK, welcomed the move. Paula Chin, specialist in sustainable materials, said: "Plastic pollution is the most visible example of the environmental crisis we are currently facing.

& # 39; Because 90 percent of the world's seabirds are found with pieces of plastic in their bellies, we all have to do our bit to fight plastic pollution, by embracing reusable items and reducing the plastic we use. However, it is also vital that companies and the government also play that role. & # 39;

The Icelandic store in Hackney goes without a plastic bag. Instead, shoppers will be offered a sturdy, reusable paper carrier for 15 p per item. It offers paper bags separately, in addition to plastic bags for life, at 40 other points of sale.

Richard Walker, from Iceland, said, "These tests help us understand how our customers think about removing one of the most common plastic-related items, the supermarket carrying case, and how they respond to various alternatives."

Lighter paper carrier bags (10 p), burlap bags (£ 1), cotton bags from the Disney brand (£ 1) and small paper bags for meat products will also be available, offering a full range of plastic-free options for customers.

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At the same time, Iceland will also try the 15p paper bags in addition to plastic bags for life (15p) in North Wales, Wirral and Cheshire, with 25 stores. This additional test will be rolled out in a further 15 stores in the Manchester region from 10 August and will be used to follow consumer preferences in an environment where the two options are offered side by side.

Change: Iceland has announced its first plastic bag-free store in London in a trial that is part of its leading strategy to cut plastic from all its own label products by 2023

Change: Iceland has announced its first plastic bag-free store in London in a trial that is part of its leading strategy to cut plastic from all its own label products by 2023

Change: Iceland has announced its first plastic bag-free store in London in a trial that is part of its leading strategy to cut plastic from all its own label products by 2023

Based on current use and estimated conversion rates for the side-by-side trial, the trials are expected to collectively save more than 210,000 plastic carrier bags from the newly purchased bag.

Both tests will last six months and the findings should be analyzed and used to inform Iceland's long-term approach to replacing single-use plastic carriers. The retailer removed all single-use plastic carrier bags from all stores in 2018 and is working on researching non-plastic alternatives that meet customer needs and that support challenging consumer behavior.

Last year, Iceland was the first retailer in the world to undertake to remove all plastic from its own packaging by the end of 2023.

Richard Walker, Managing Director at Iceland, commented: & We know that many customers only use "bags for life" once and retailers must work together to challenge this behavior and find alternative solutions. Last year more than 1.2 billion plastic bags were sold for life in the UK and this must change drastically.

& # 39; These tests will help us understand how our customers think about removing one of the most common items related to plastic, the carrier bag from the supermarket, and how they respond to various alternatives. We look forward to seeing how customers respond and using the results of the trials in our wider plans to reduce our plastic footprint. & # 39;

This is the latest in a series of leading-edge trials in which the retailer has introduced the first inverted vending machines in the store to the store and trial products without plastic, with fruit and vegetables in loose form or in alternative packaging.

Since its commitment in January 2018, Iceland has reduced or removed the plastic packaging in 81 lines and removed more than 1500 tonnes of plastic in the packaging.

HOW MANY PLASTIC IS IN THE ARCTIC?

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The pristine waters of the Arctic are turning into a floating waste dump – a threat to marine life, scientists warn.

One of the densest areas of plastic waste in the world has been discovered north of Norway and Russia.

Miles of civilization, the amount of plastic waste in the Barents Sea – on the fringes of the Arctic Ocean – has risen nearly 20 times in just ten years.

The waste, which included plastic bags and fishing nets, was discovered more than 8,000 feet below the surface of the water.

The nest was captured at two polar research stations between Greenland and the Svalbard archipelago – found halfway between Norway and the North Pole.

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The data was recorded by researchers from the Alfred Wegener Research Institute in Germany and published in the journal Deep-Sea Research I.

In one area, the amount of waste had risen from 346 pieces per square kilometer in 2004 to 6,333 in 2014.

Scientists now fear that the region has become one of & # 39; the world's largest floating waste dumps, alongside other zones in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean.

Fishing nets are a major source of plastic pollution on the Arctic island of Svalbard, with an estimated 80 percent of plastic waste from fishing.

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