Advertisements
The infant snake (photo), nestled in the rocks of a retaining wall, was taken to nearby Flagstone Creek to be released

Terrifying moment of deadly East Brown snake seems to haunt reptile catcher – but expert reveals why he was never in danger and how he could prevent being bitten

  • A snake catcher has revealed the moment he was being chased by an oriental brown
  • Reptile remover Alex Reynolds shows how movement makes snakes defensive
  • He advises others to remain silent during a meeting and the snake will continue
Advertisements

This is the moving moment when a snake catcher scolds a very poisonous eastern brown to break through the myths about the aggressive temperament of the snake.

Alex Reynolds, owner of A + Reptile Locations in Toowoomba, was called to a home on September 20.

The infant snake, nestled in the rocks of a retaining wall, was taken to nearby Flagstone Creek to be released.

The infant snake (photo), nestled in the rocks of a retaining wall, was taken to nearby Flagstone Creek to be released

Advertisements

The infant snake (photo), nestled in the rocks of a retaining wall, was taken to nearby Flagstone Creek to be released

But before Mr. Reynolds let her go, he took a video to teach people how to react when they encounter the deadly creature.

& # 39; She's only small, but this is their defense – I'm scared of me in her room, she doesn't understand what's going on & # 39 ;, Mr. Reynolds says.

& # 39; She just thinks I'm trying to kill her. But if you look at this, if I remain silent and I pose and I am not a threat to her, she will withdraw and begin to relieve herself & # 39 ;.

Mr. Reynolds then starts waving his hat to show how the snake is getting ready to hit with fast movements.

& # 39; If my shadow moves, look at her, she defends herself again.

& # 39; This only proves that they will always be the first to withdraw & # 39 ;, he says.

Advertisements

The reptile remover – who says he has been compared to Steve Irwin – says that the best way to prevent you from getting bitten is completely stopped.

& # 39; It's all about staying still and staying calm. If you wave your arms, you leave and call your friends. It's when you move quickly that you get into conflict, & he said to Daily Mail Australia.

Alex Reynolds (photo), owner of A + Reptile Locations in Toowoomba, was called to a home on September 20 to remove the snake

Alex Reynolds (photo), owner of A + Reptile Locations in Toowoomba, was called to a home on September 20 to remove the snake

Alex Reynolds (photo), owner of A + Reptile Locations in Toowoomba, was called to a home on September 20 to remove the snake

The footage of the incident has been shared more than 15,000 times since it was posted on Facebook last week.

Advertisements

Many users thanked Mr Reynolds for sharing useful information about the reptile.

& # 39; Work in harmony. Nice working size. Love how you show that one of & # 39; the world's deadliest snakes can be very safe to be around. Steve Irwin would admire what you did, I think, & a man said.

Another commentator wrote: & # 39; I want to thank you for posting. I'm ridiculously scared of snakes and watching your video helps me build courage. I'm always in the bush and I hate my fears and worries, thank you very much. Let them come. & # 39;

Snake activity in Australia increases when the mating season starts in the middle of spring.

Eastern brown snake facts

– The eastern brown snake is the species most responsible for deaths caused by snake bites in Australia.

Advertisements

– Although they are dangerous, they will always try to avoid a confrontation and will only attack as a last resort if they are threatened.

– They are native to Eastern Australia, but can be found anywhere between the coast and the central desert.

-It lives in a wide range of habitats, but mainly occurs in open grasslands, meadows and forests, and they help farmers reduce rodents.

-They can be more than two meters long and can move with surprising speed on hot days.

-Color can vary from uniformly brown to gray or dark brown, while their belly can be cream, yellow or light orange with darker orange spots.

Advertisements

-The females produce clutches of up to 30 eggs in late spring or early summer.

SOURCE: Australian Reptile Park

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news