Terrified of assaults? You probably grew up in the 70s!

The policy you grew up with determines how scared you are of certain crimes, even decades after you became an adult, suggests new research. Those who were teenagers under labor in the 70s worry more about assaults (stock image)

The policy when you were a teenager determines how much you fear certain crimes, has suggested new research.

These fears about certain crimes last decades to adulthood.

According to the latest findings, adolescents under labor in the 1970s now fear robberies more than other generations, while people whose formative years fell in love with Margaret Thatcher fear mostly thefts.

These anxieties stem from the key social and political issues that plagued Britain at that time, the researchers said.

A dramatic increase in real estate crime during the 1980s means that people who were in adolescence under Thatcher are afraid of theft, while an increase in antisocial crime under Tony Blair means that millennials are more concerned about vandalism and the loitering.

"We are more sensitive to social events between the ages of 15 and 25, since that is when we form many of our enduring views of the world," the researchers said.

The policy you grew up with determines how scared you are of certain crimes, even decades after you became an adult, suggests new research. Those who were teenagers under labor in the 70s worry more about assaults (stock image)

The policy you grew up with determines how scared you are of certain crimes, even decades after you became an adult, suggests new research. Those who were teenagers under labor in the 70s worry more about assaults (stock image)

Researchers from the University of Sheffield Southampton University and Sciences Po in Paris, investigated how our education affects our feelings about certain crimes.

The co-author of the study, Professor Stephen Farrall, deputy director of the University of Sheffield Law School, said: "The pronouncements that politicians make about crime can have a lasting impact on the criminal fears of young adults.

"The political and popular debates about crime that prevail in youth seem to have an impact on the fears that these people report to adulthood and to adulthood."

The scientists analyzed 30 years of data on the fear of crime and antisocial behavior of the Office of National Statistics of the British Crime Survey in England and Wales.

By doing so, they were able to estimate the net effects of individual aging, the historical period in which the survey was conducted, and the political generations to which the respondents belonged.

The researchers found a strong link between a respondent's fear of certain crimes and their political generation.

The political climate that we experience with ages between 15 and 25 years has a great influence on our anxieties because this is the age in which we form key opinions and we are more sensitive to social events, say the researchers (stock image)

The political climate that we experience with ages between 15 and 25 years has a great influence on our anxieties because this is the age in which we form key opinions and we are more sensitive to social events, say the researchers (stock image)

The political climate that we experience with ages between 15 and 25 years has a great influence on our anxieties because this is the age in which we form key opinions and we are more sensitive to social events, say the researchers (stock image)

For example, those who grew up under the leadership of Margaret Thatcher (1979-1990) or John Major (1990-1997) expressed the highest level of concern about domestic theft.

This same generation witnessed a dramatic increase in property crime during the 1980s.

Meanwhile, the generation whose formative years fell during the leadership of Wilson and Callaghan expressed the highest levels of concern about theft and assault, which was a key concern for politicians, policy makers and journalists at that time.

The responses to antisocial behaviors tell a similar story.

THE YEAR THAT YOU GROW HAS AFFECTED YOUR CRIME FEAR?

The research conducted by the University of Sheffield suggests that the year we grew up has a great impact on the crimes we fear most.

This is because the political and social climate during our adolescence and early 20's alters our last perception of the world.

The researchers found the following links between the political generations and the most feared crimes:

  • Harold Wilson and James Callaghan (1974-79): robberies and robberies
  • Margaret Thatcher and John Major (1979-1997): Thieves
  • Tony Blair and Gordon Brown (1997-2010): Vandalism and loitering

People who grew up during the Blair and Brown governments, from the late 1990s to 2010, reported the highest level of concern about local problems, such as vandalism, marauding teenagers and noisy neighbors.

Such problems were major problems during that political period.

In general, the new study shows that people have a greater propensity to fear the crimes that were at the center of the political debate during their youth, and this effect persists into adulthood.

The results reveal that fears of crime can persist, and that the processes by which people form their political values ​​can exert a long-term influence on their attitude towards crime.

Professor Farrall concluded: "Our narratives of crime and disorder tell us something important about the lasting influence of our political history and the stories we hear about the crime."

The full study was published in the British Journal of Criminology.

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