Tension moment Gladys Berejiklian cuts to journalist during Covid-19 presser

Gladys Berejiklian told a journalist “don’t yell at me” during her Covid-19 press conference on Tuesday.

The tense moment came after the NSW Prime Minister was asked whether the state expects widespread international travel if 80 percent of the country is poked, even as other states like Western Australia keep domestic borders closed.

Ms Berejiklian said it would be ‘disappointing if New South Wales and Victorian residents were able to go abroad before going interstate’ and insisted that NSW would ‘do more than its fair share’ to help stranded Australians to repatriate.

Pictured: Residents in Chatswood on Sydney’s Lower North Shore on Tuesday

When the Prime Minister’s answer was ready, several journalists shouted “Prime Minister, Prime Minister” to get her attention to ask the next question.

The same journalist who asked about travel said loudly, “Can I follow up because…”

The Prime Minister interrupted her and said, “Don’t yell at me.”

The reporter looked offended and paused for a moment before saying, “Can I go on, Prime Minister,” and asking her second question.

It came after Ms Berejiklian announced that the state had recorded 1,164 Covid-19 cases and three deaths from the virus overnight.

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) told a journalist 'don't yell at me' on Tuesday during her Covid-19 press conference

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured) told a journalist ‘don’t yell at me’ on Tuesday during her Covid-19 press conference

The Sydney lockdown will last until at least October.  Pictured: Residents in Camperdown, Sydney's west on Tuesday

The Sydney lockdown will last until at least October. Pictured: Residents in Camperdown, Sydney’s west on Tuesday

A woman in her 50s and two men in their 80s and 90s from southwestern Sydney have died in the past 24 hours after contracting the virus.

Authorities said the virus continued to spread fastest in the west of the city – with Guildford, Merrylands, Auburn, Greenacre, Bankstown, Blacktown and surrounding suburbs as the areas of greatest concern.

Ms Berejiklian said NSW was on track to hit seven million shots by the end of the week – meaning 70 percent of the state’s population had received at least one Covid-19 shot.

She hoped NSW could hit a double 80 percent dose by December, so Australians can be reunited with their families in time for Christmas.

But Health Minister Brad Hazzard was stunned Tuesday when asked why parents trying to enroll their teenage children for a Pfizer shot at the Qudos Bank Arena mass vaccination hub were unable to find an appointment until October.

“We keep hearing that vaccinations are available at the Qudos Bank Arena, but I’ve heard of someone they can’t book a 16-year-old with,” a reporter told him.

“There are no vaccinations on the website until October. Is that right?’

Mr Hazzard seemed stunned by the question and only confirmed the needlestick shortage after consulting with one of his assistants.

He said health officials in NSW were urgently requesting more doses of Pfizer from the federal government, but urged anyone over 18 to consider getting the more readily available AstraZeneca vaccine.

Pictured is a woman outside the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney's inner west Camperdown on Tuesday.  NSW has a record 1,164 Covid-19 cases and three deaths from the virus overnight

Pictured is a woman outside the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney’s inner west Camperdown on Tuesday. NSW has a record 1,164 Covid-19 cases and three deaths from the virus overnight

“I have personal friends and relatives who have owned AstraZeneca. Go have it. It’s a very good vaccine,” he said.

“It has saved huge numbers of people around the world from an extremely dangerous virus.”

The figures come after it emerged that more than 100 people in Sydney had contracted Covid-19 while staying in public hospitals and 12 have died from the virus – exposing the city’s infection control procedures.

In addition to patients, 19 hospital workers who visit multiple patients between wards have also contracted the virus at six of Sydney’s largest health facilities.

The most recent patient, a woman in her 60s, died at Westmead Hospital with the source of her infection at nearby Cumberland Hospital in Parramatta – which has an outbreak of 11 cases.

Health Services Union secretary Gerard Hayes said frustrated health personnel already exhausted by treating patients were also now facing additional pressure and fear that they could spread the virus to someone entrusted to their care. .

“It can feel like they’re being told they’re spreading it while they’re trying to care for patients under very difficult circumstances,” he told the newspaper. SMH.

Royal Melbourne Hospital chief medical officer Dr Cate Kelly said NSW could learn from Victoria’s second wave in 2020, in which 271 health workers contracted the virus.

She said a number of steps at the Royal Melbourne Hospital have been shown to be effective in reducing transmission.

“The first step is to try to prevent it from entering, first of all, do all the screening you can and of course have PPE,” she wrote in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday.

If a case is discovered, said Dr. Kelly said the treatment environment needed to be addressed immediately – for example, moving the patient to a room with high ceilings or a room with negative pressure for the most contagious people, deploying air purifiers and limiting staff numbers.

“If no one in the cohort has become infected by day five, you can have a degree of confidence that they won’t test positive and so you have to take the risk of judging that against the risk that you don’t have specialized staff there,” she said. said.

“Because if they go back in, and they’re wearing an N95 mask, and they’re doubly vaccinated, the risk of transmission is low, even in that worst-case situation.”

The Health Services Union said frustrated and exhausted staff also faced the risk of transmitting the virus and caring for patients (Photo: Sydney health workers)

The Health Services Union said frustrated and exhausted staff also faced the risk of transmitting the virus and caring for patients (Photo: Sydney health workers)

There have been multiple outbreaks in public hospitals in Sydney – mainly confined to the south and west of the city in 2021.

At Liverpool Hospital, 19 patients caught Covid-19, along with eight staff members, and 11 people died from the virus.

At Cumberland Hospital, 12 patients became infected and one died.

In Penrith, 26 patients and one staff member contracted Covid at the Nepean Mental Health Centre, while in the Nepean Hospital 12 patients contracted Covid, along with eight staff members and five people died.

At Canterbury Hospital, 22 patients became infected and five people died.

And at St. George Hospital, two employees caught Covid along with seven patients and two people died.

October is expected to be the worst month for hospitalizations in the worst-hit state of NSW, with 1,290 cases recorded on Monday.

The chief medical officer of the Royal Melbourne Hospital said NSW could learn from the Victoria outbreak in 2020 (Photo: Sydney health workers)

The chief medical officer of the Royal Melbourne Hospital said NSW could learn from the Victoria outbreak in 2020 (Photo: Sydney health workers)

Doctors have called for mandatory coronavirus vaccines for all health professionals, including cleaners, receptionists and contractors.

Australian Medical Association president Omar Khorshid said there were worrying numbers of infected frontline workers and several clusters linked to hospitals.

“This is about the safety of health professionals and the safety of patients, not vaccines involving violence,” he said on Tuesday.

The AMA wants nationally consistent public health orders to mandate vaccinations for all health professionals as soon as possible.

“We’ve said plans to reopen Australia will be a disaster unless our health sector is ready and that means we have a fully protected medical workforce,” said Dr. khorshid.

Elderly care workers must have had at least one vaccine dose by September 17.

A woman in her 50s and two men in their 80s and 90s from south west Sydney have died in the last 24 hours - a day after NSW hit an Australian record 1,290 cases on Monday

A woman in her 50s and two men in their 80s and 90s from south west Sydney have died in the last 24 hours – a day after NSW hit an Australian record 1,290 cases on Monday

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