Ten defects of GLARING that cast great doubts on the suspects of poisoning & # 039; claims in Russia TV

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (photo on the left) and Alexander Petrov (photo on the right) have spoken in an interview on RT

The two novichok assassins sponsored by the Kremlin ridiculed after claiming they were ordinary tourists have at least ten holes in their "absurd" story, it was revealed today.

The men, who claim to be Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov, claimed to be desperate to see the magnificent 123-meter spire of Salisbury Cathedral and visited the city twice in three days.

But strangely they stayed 127 miles away at a hotel in East London even though they insisted they were in Britain to visit their "famous cathedral" and did not take photos.

They also alleged that attempts to reach nearby Stonehenge were thwarted, even though a bus was heading to the world's most famous prehistoric monument from outside the station.

And the men claimed snow to their knees, interrupted their trip to Salisbury, even though the weather was sunny and the sidewalks were transparent, while they also admitted that they might have ended by chance outside the house of Sergei Skripal.

The couple also did not explain why they booked two alternative flights back from London to Moscow, giving them the option to flee on Sunday or Monday, and CCTV suggested they did not have any luggage with them on the way home to Russia.

His unusual story was labeled "lies and flagrant fabrication" by Theresa May last night, who said he "insulted the public's intelligence" and that it was deeply offensive to the victims of the chemical attack.

Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt added: "The last time the Russian army claimed to be on vacation was when they invaded Ukraine in 2014."

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (photo on the left) and Alexander Petrov (photo on the right) have spoken in an interview on RT

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (photo on the left) and Alexander Petrov (photo on the right) have spoken in an interview on RT

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov on Fisherton Road, Salisbury at 1:05 p.m. M. On March 4, 2018

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov on Fisherton Road, Salisbury at 1:05 p.m. M. On March 4, 2018

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov on Fisherton Road, Salisbury at 1:05 p.m. M. On March 4, 2018

Interviewer Margarita Simonyan of Russia Today interviewed the two men who raised a series of questions

Interviewer Margarita Simonyan of Russia Today interviewed the two men who raised a series of questions

Interviewer Margarita Simonyan of Russia Today interviewed the two men who raised a series of questions

The men escaped coverage eight days after Scotland Yard – who accused them of attempted homicide – issued a photocopy and Ms. May told the House of Commons that they were intelligence agents of the feared Russian GRU.

The men told state radio station Russia Today, funded by the Kremlin, that they had been on vacation in Salisbury for two days.

But these ten gross flaws make a big hole in their version of events.

1. What about the Novichok found in the hotel room?

The assassins made no attempt to answer why traces of novichok were found in a room inside their hotel in East London (pictured)

The assassins made no attempt to answer why traces of novichok were found in a room inside their hotel in East London (pictured)

The assassins made no attempt to answer why traces of novichok were found in a room inside their hotel in East London (pictured)

The most obvious problem in his story is the fact that novichok traces were found in his hotel room in East London. They were not asked, and did not explain, how this could be the case.

2. Why stay in East London anyway?

The men chose a hotel 127 miles from Salisbury despite heading to the city twice in three days

The men chose a hotel 127 miles from Salisbury despite heading to the city twice in three days

The men chose a hotel 127 miles from Salisbury despite heading to the city twice in three days

The couple says he flew from Moscow to visit Salisbury and insisted: "Our friends have been suggesting for a long time that we visit this wonderful city." But if you really wanted to experience the jewel of Wiltshire, why not stay in one of the more than 60 hotels and pensions in the city? Instead, they lost hours coming and going on trains.

3. Your complaints about the snowy weather

The Russians, accustomed to the cold and the snow, spoke of being hot in bad weather despite enjoying the sun and clear sidewalks

The Russians, accustomed to the cold and the snow, spoke of being hot in bad weather despite enjoying the sun and clear sidewalks

The Russians, accustomed to the cold and the snow, spoke of being hot in bad weather despite enjoying the sun and clear sidewalks

Ruslan Boshirov said: "It was impossible to get anywhere because of the snow." We were soaked to the knees & # 39; And his accomplice complained that on his visit on Sunday, there was heavy rain with snow & # 39; Salisbury, in fact, had transformed into an impressive winter wonderland with a blanket of snow in the days before it arrived. But temperatures were already declining on Saturday, March 3, the first day they visited. Sunday was a relatively warm and occasionally sunny 9C. There were no reports of "heavy rain". CCTV images of the couple on Sunday showed that it was wet but that there was no snowflake in sight. And a photo taken at Salisbury Cathedral on March 3 shows that the snow had already melted from its roof.

4. Wrong address to visit the cathedral

CCTV shows how the two Russians left in the opposite direction if they wanted to visit the cathedral

CCTV shows how the two Russians left in the opposite direction if they wanted to visit the cathedral

CCTV shows how the two Russians left in the opposite direction if they wanted to visit the cathedral

Boshirov and Petrov insist that they wanted to witness the magnificent spire of Salisbury Cathedral. This can be seen from the train station, but CCTV shows how the two Russians left in a completely opposite direction. Instead of heading southeast from the station to the cathedral, they walked northwest and were captured on CCTV via a Shell garage on the way to the house of the Skripal family.

5. There are no pictures of them visiting the cathedral

The men made Salisbury Cathedral the center of their trip, but they did not take photos and they were not captured by CCTV outside.

The men made Salisbury Cathedral the center of their trip, but they did not take photos and they were not captured by CCTV outside.

The men made Salisbury Cathedral the center of their trip, but they did not take photos and they were not captured by CCTV outside.

Unlikely visitors were seen in many places in Salisbury, but not in the cathedral, despite being the main attraction of the city. They claim to have been there on Sunday, saying: & # 39; The cathedral is very beautiful.

They have many tourists, many Russian tourists. If there is CCTV of them visiting the 800-year-old treasure, it has not been made public. However, the two men claim to have their own snapshot of their visit, but have not been able to release them. The couple also says that they also went to a park, we had a coffee. We went to a coffee shop and we had coffee & # 39; So far, CCTV has not been launched to support this.

The assertion of two suspects in the Skripal case that they visited Salisbury to see their cathedral "does not seem to add up," said the bishop of the city of Wiltshire.

The bishop of Salisbury, Nicholas Holtam, said he had no knowledge of any evidence linking Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov to the cathedral, and suggested that Russian men could have benefited from a visit to the building and a display of his copy of the Magna Carta

Responding to the men's claims, the bishop told BBC Radio 4's Today program: "It really does not add up, right?"

When asked if there were CCTV images in the cathedral, he said: "There is nothing that links the cathedral that we have, or I think someone has it, there is no way to prove that."

The bishop said that his response to the men's television interview was to think "What a pity they did not spend more time in that city, where they could have explored the cathedral and seen a building committed to the love of God, where there is a regular worship to raise our hearts, the highest needle and a copy of the Magna Carta on the rule of law and justice. They did not seem to see any of that, right?

6. Bus trips to Stonehenge were NOT canceled

Snow prevented them from reaching the world-famous prehistoric monument, but the bus was running that day.

Snow prevented them from reaching the world-famous prehistoric monument, but the bus was running that day.

Snow prevented them from reaching the world-famous prehistoric monument, but the bus was running that day.

Petrov said the couple had also wanted to see Stonehenge in the Salisbury plain, but it did not work because of the melting snow. Visitors to the prehistoric monument, nine miles north of Salisbury, can take a bus directly from the station's service station.

When asked if snow or anything else had affected the services, a spokesman for bus operator Salisbury Reds said yesterday: "Tour buses ran normally on Sunday, March 4."

7. Photo of entrance to the airport

Boshirov saod this image was faked, but the British police has discredited that myth

Boshirov saod this image was faked, but the British police has discredited that myth

Boshirov saod this image was faked, but the British police has discredited that myth

Boshirov suggests that the CCTV photos of them walking through the Gatwick arrivals must have been faked, because they seem to show the two men walking through the same customs channel with the same time stamp. But the British police already explained that there are two parallel channels.

8. & # 39; False photographs & # 39; they proved to be real

As they walk through Salisbury on the day of the attack, they are seen on CCTV on Fisherton Road shortly after 1pm. Russian sources tried to say that it was not them, but the suspects confirmed yesterday that it was

As they walk through Salisbury on the day of the attack, they are seen on CCTV on Fisherton Road shortly after 1pm. Russian sources tried to say that it was not them, but the suspects confirmed yesterday that it was

As they walk through Salisbury on the day of the attack, they are seen on CCTV on Fisherton Road shortly after 1pm. Russian sources tried to say that it was not them, but the suspects confirmed yesterday that it was

The couple's confessions that they were indeed the men in the photos ruin one of Russia's favorite conspiracy theories: that the British authorities falsified the images.

9. Bad time

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (photographed together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he smeared on his door when officers were in town

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (photographed together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he smeared on his door when officers were in town

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (photographed together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he smeared on his door when officers were in town

One major flaw in his account was the fact that the Skripals were actually poisoned the day they visited Salisbury.

10. Two return flights and lost luggage

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov in the safety of Heathrow Airport before their flight home, but they also had tickets for the next morning

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov in the safety of Heathrow Airport before their flight home, but they also had tickets for the next morning

Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov in the safety of Heathrow Airport before their flight home, but they also had tickets for the next morning

The couple also did not explain why they booked two alternative flights back from London to Moscow, giving them the option to flee on Sunday or Monday. The men went straight from Salisbury to Heathrow for the night flight. But CCTV suggested that they did not have any luggage with them on their way home.

Reality vs. fiction: how the claims of novichok spies fall every time

Claim

"We arrived in Salisbury on day 3 [of March], we tried to walk through the city, but as the city was covered in snow, we could only half an hour, we got wet. On March 4, we went back there, because the snow melted in London, it was hot. But, again, at lunchtime, there was heavy rain with snow. "

True

The Russians come from a country that deals with snow most of the year, with one from Siberia, one of the coldest places on the planet. The Met believe that on March 3 they found the house of Skripal knowing that they would return the next day to attack him. There's no way they can cover that distance in the 30 minutes they claimed to be in Salisbury.

Claim

The day the Skripals were poisoned, on March 4, the men said they went to see the cathedral. Boshirov said: & # 39; TThe cathedral is very beautiful. They have many tourists, many Russian tourists, many Russian-speaking tourists

True

CCTV shows them a mile away from the cathedral near the home of Sergei Skripal. After arriving in the city at 11.48 a.m., they were in their target's home in ten minutes. An hour later they appeared in the center of the city and took a train 45 minutes later, with no possibility of sightseeing. The bishop of Salisbury confirmed today that they appear to have no images of the men in the cathedral.

Claim

"Of course, we went to visit Stonehenge, Old Sarum, the Cathedral of the Virgin Mary, but it did not work because there were muddy mud everywhere, as we would say in Russian, total hail." We got wet, went back to the train station and went back to next train.

True

The photos, the reviews of TripAdvisor and the publications in social networks prove that other people could visit these historical sites without being hindered by the weather.

Claim

The men admitted that they may have stumbled upon the house of Skripal by accident. Boshirov said: "Maybe we approved it, maybe we did not approve it, I do not know, I had not heard it." I had not heard this last name, I did not know anything about them before this situation began, this nightmare with us. "

True

The house was in the wrong direction away from the cathedral and Sergei Skripal's defection to Britain was one of the biggest espionage stories in Russia of the last 20 years.

Claim

The poison arrived in Britain in a high-tech perfume bottle designed not to spill, especially when sprayed. The men said: "Is not it silly for a normal man to wear women's perfume? He's just gone through customs, when you go through customs they check all your stuff, or just any police officer can check them, I think if we had something, they would have had questions: Why does a man in his luggage have a woman's perfume?

True

A small bottle of perfume in hand luggage is not remotely strange, especially because many men buy it as a gift without paying taxes.

The wrath of the corpulent couple before the gay speculation

Being marked as killers was bad enough, but what really bothered Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov was the suggestion that they wear women's perfume.

The muscular men feigned horror when asked if they smuggled mortal novichok into a fragrance bottle of Nina Ricci.

Boshirov said angrily that it would be "stupid for two heterosexual men to wear perfume for ladies," and his accomplice grumbled, "Why would a man need perfume for women?"

His subtle objections led the Russian media to suggest that the two men "fashion" They were together in a romantic minibreak.

A news website even started a bizarre poll asking readers if the musculars were "agents made to be gay or gay made to be agents".

After the perfumes exchange, the RT interviewer probed: "Speaking of heterosexual men, all the footage is presented to both of them, they spent time together, they lived together, they went for a walk together, what do they have in common that they spend so much time together?

Boshirov complained: "You know, let's not break anyone's privacy. We seek protection, but this is becoming a kind of interrogation. "

When online speculation about her sexuality began, the 38-year-old interviewer, Margarita Simonyan, head of the Kremlin propaganda channel, replied: "I do not know if they are homosexual or not." They are very fashionable, with small beards, good haircuts, tight pants, tight sweaters over big biceps. "

She said the men had not "hit" her.

The two murderers of the Kremlin were widely ridiculed yesterday after claiming that they were ordinary tourists desperate to see the magnificent 123 meter spire of Salisbury Cathedral.

The large couple admitted that they were in the city the day Sergei Skripal was poisoned, but insisted that they only went to visit his "famous cathedral" and nearby Stonehenge.

His unusual story was labeled "lies and flagrant fabrication" by Theresa May last night, who said he "insulted the public's intelligence" and that it was deeply offensive to the victims of the chemical attack. Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt added: "The last time the Russian army claimed to be on vacation was when they invaded Ukraine in 2014."

The men escaped coverage eight days after Scotland Yard – who accused them of attempted homicide – issued a photocopy and Ms. May told the House of Commons that they were intelligence agents of the feared Russian GRU.

The men told state radio station Russia Today, funded by the Kremlin, that they had been on vacation in Salisbury for two days.

In the interview administered by the scenario, they admitted "maybe" that they ended up in the suburban house of former double agent Mr. Skripal by accident while looking for the cathedral, which has a 400-foot needle and is 25 minutes walking in the opposite direction .

They insisted that their real names were Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov. The Yard says these are the aliases that the GRU hit men used to travel to Britain on March 2 for their assassination mission.

They were interviewed on camera for 25 minutes by the editor-in-chief of RT, who says he offered them cognac to calm their nerves.

The men claimed that their lives had been "turned over" since they were named as suspects.

But the interview did not shed light on their background and they were not asked to explain why novichok traces were found in their hotel room in East London, 127 kilometers from the Skripals' home.

Instead, to make fun of everyone, they told how they flew to Britain because their friends urged them to visit the "wonderful" Salisbury.

In praising his fate, Boshirov sounded as if he were reciting a Wikipedia page, declaring: "It's famous for its 123-meter needle, it's famous for its clock, it's the oldest working clock in the world."

A body language expert said that the men seemed to be reciting & # 39; monologues of guide books & # 39; about Salisbury.

Even the prominent Russians were openly ridiculing the couple's insistence that they were not trained killers.

In London, the prime minister criticized Moscow's "contempt" for the novichok episode, which almost killed Skripal, 66, and his daughter Yulia, 33, and claimed the life of Dawn Sturgess, 44, whose Partner Charlie Rowley, 45, had inadvertently given him the bottle of fake perfume used to transport the nerve agent.

It is understood that the anti-terrorist police & # 39; supports everything & # 39; what they have said about the two suspects. The intelligence officers know the real names of the men, and the sources said that they concluded that they were hit men of the GRU based on solid intelligence that had not been made public.

Vranyo: Russian word that means to lie without hoping to be believed

The Russians have a word, vranyo, which means telling a lie without expecting to be believed.

The lie is said purely to save face. The cashier knows he will not believe it, but he knows they will not challenge him.

It was a common practice in the Soviet era.

Ms. May said: "The lies and blatant inventions in this interview … are an insult to the public's intelligence, and more importantly, they are deeply offensive to the victims and loved ones of this horrible attack. What we have come to expect: An illegal chemical weapon has been used in the streets of this country We have seen four seriously ill people in the hospital and an innocent woman has died Russia has responded with contempt ".

As relations with Moscow worsened, the Russian embassy claimed that its diplomats had been "banned". to attend a Conservative Party event for the first time.

The ministers say that Vladimir Putin personally ordered the assassination attempt, but the Russian president has denied any involvement.

In their interview, Petrov and Boshirov told RT that they fear that the British secret service has a "reward in our heads".

Boshirov denied that the Kremlin had forced them to speak, and said: "We fear leaving, we fear for ourselves, our lives and those of our loved ones." They described themselves as "decent boys" working in the "sports nutrition business."

They said they went to Salisbury twice in two days to try to get to Stonehenge, but they were frustrated each time by the snow. They said they were soaked & # 39; and & # 39; frozen & # 39; and that both days remained for a short period, before returning to London on the train.

Boshirov confessed: & # 39; Perhaps we did [approach] Skripal's house, but we do not know where it was located.

Police say the hit men went on Saturday, March 3, as a dry run before Sunday's assassination attempt and that they were traveling back to Heathrow and a flight to Moscow that night.

In Moscow, Sergey Dorenko, from the radio station Govorit Moskva, said he was embarrassed by the "clumsy" interview.

Journalist Oleg Kashin said that it had the opposite effect to what Putin had expected, and amounted to a "confession" that Britain was right.

The killers claim they are "decent boys" who were on a day trip to admire Salisbury and not kill the former Skripal spy

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

The most wanted men in Europe spoke for the first time today and insisted that they are victims of a smear campaign.

Here is a transcript

The editor-in-chief of RT Margarita Simonyan: He called my cell phone, saying that you were Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov. You are Alexander Petrov, and you are Ruslan Boshirov. You look like the people we saw in those photos and videos from the United Kingdom. So, who are you really?

Alexander Petrov: We are the people you saw.

Ruslan Boshirov: I'm Ruslan Boshirov.

AP: And I am Alexander Petrov.

MS: Are these your real names?

RB: Yes, these are our real names.

MS: But even now, frankly, you look very tense.

AP: How would you look if you were in our shoes?

RB: When your whole life turns upside down suddenly, overnight, and it falls apart.

MS: The guys we all saw in those London and Salisbury videos, wearing those jackets and sneakers, are you?

AP: Yes, it's us.

MS: What were you doing there?

AP: Our friends have been suggesting for a long time that we visited this wonderful city.

MS: Salisbury? A wonderful city?

AP: Yes.

MS: What makes it so wonderful?

RB: It's a tourist city. They have a famous cathedral there, Salisbury Cathedral. It is famous all over Europe and, in fact, all over the world, I think. It is famous for its 123 meter needle. It is famous for its watch. It is the oldest working clock in the world.

MS: So, did you travel to Salisbury to see the clock?

AP: No, we initially planned to go to London and have fun there. This time, it was not a business trip. Our plan was to spend time in London and then visit Salisbury. Of course, we wanted to do everything in one day. But when we got there, even our plane could not land on the first approach. This is due to all the havoc they had with transport in the United Kingdom on March 2 and 3. Due to the heavy snow, almost all the cities were paralyzed. We could not go anywhere.

RB: It was in all the news. The railroads did not work on March 2 and 3. The roads were closed. Police cars and ambulances blocked the roads. There was no traffic at all, there were no trains, nothing. Why does not anyone talk about this?

MS: Can you give the timeline? Minute by minute, or at least hour by hour, or as much as you can remember. You came to the United Kingdom, as you said, to have some fun and see the cathedral, see a clock in Salisbury. Can you tell us what you did in the United Kingdom? You spent two days there, right?

AP: Actually, three.

MS: OK, three. What did you do those three days?

AP: We arrived on March 2. We went to the train station to check the schedule, to see where we could go.

RB: The initial plan was to go there and return that day. Just take a look and come back the same day.

AP: For Salisbury, that's it. A day in Salisbury is enough. There is not much you can do there.

RB: It's a normal city. A regular tourist city.

MS: OK, I understand that. That was your plan. But what did you really do? You arrived. There were heavy snowfalls. No trains, nothing. What did you do then?

AP: No, we arrived in Salisbury on March 3. We wanted to walk through the city, but as the whole city was covered in snow, we spent only 30 minutes there. We were all wet.

RB: There are no images. The media, television, nobody talks about the fact that the transportation system was paralyzed that day. It was impossible to get anywhere because of the snow. We were soaked to the knees.

MS: Good. You went for a walk for 30 minutes, you got wet. Whats Next?

AP: We travel there to see Stonehenge, Old Sarum and the Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary. But it did not work because of the melted snow. The whole city was covered in sleet. We got wet, so we went back to the train station and took the first train to return. We spent about 40 minutes in a cafeteria at the train station.

RB: drinking coffee. Drinking hot coffee because we were soaked.

AP: Maybe a little over an hour. That's because of the large intervals between trains. I think this was because of the snowfall. We returned to London and continued our trip.

RB: We walk through London …

MS: So, you only spent an hour in Salisbury?

AP: on March 3? Yes. That's because it was impossible to get anywhere.

MS: How was the next day?

AP: On March 4, we went back there, because the snow melted in London, it was hot.

RB: it was sunny.

AP: And we thought, we really wanted to see Old Sarum and the cathedral. So we decided to give it another try on March 4th.

MS: Another attempt to do what?

AP: go sightseeing.

RB: To see this famous cathedral. To visit Old Sarum.

MS: So, did you see it?

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RB: Yes, we did.

AP: On March 4, we did it. But again, at lunchtime, there was heavy rain with snow.

RB: For some reason, nobody talks about this fact.

AP: So we left early.

MS: Is it beautiful?

RB: The cathedral is very beautiful. They have many tourists, many Russian tourists, many Russian-speaking tourists.

AP: Por cierto, deberían tener muchas fotos de la catedral.

MS: ¿Tus fotos, quieres decir?

AP: Deberían mostrarlos.

MS: ¿Supongo que tomaste algunas fotos mientras estuviste en la catedral?

RB: por supuesto.

AP: Claro, lo hicimos.

RB: Fuimos a un parque, tomamos un café. Fuimos a una cafetería y tomamos café. Caminamos, disfrutando de esos hermosos edificios góticos ingleses.

AP: Por alguna razón, no muestran esto. Solo muestran cómo fuimos a la estación de tren.

MS: Si nos das tus fotos, podemos mostrarlas. Entonces, mientras estabas en Salisbury, ¿fuiste a algún lugar cerca de la casa de los Skripals?

AP: Tal vez. No lo sabemos

RB: ¿Y usted? ¿Sabes dónde está su casa?

MS: Yo no. ¿Vos si?

RB: Nosotros tampoco.

AP: Ojalá alguien nos dijera dónde está.

RB: Tal vez lo aprobamos, o tal vez no lo hicimos. I had never heard about them before this nightmare began. I had never heard this name before. No sabía nada de ellos.

MS: Cuando llegaste al Reino Unido, cuando estuviste en Londres o en Salisbury, durante todo tu viaje, ¿tenías algún Novichok u otro agente venenoso o sustancia peligrosa?

RB: No.

AP: Es absurdo.

MS: ¿Tenías la botella de perfume de Nina Ricci que el Reino Unido presenta como evidencia de tu presunto delito?

RB: ¿No crees que es algo estúpido para dos hombres heterosexuales llevar perfumes para mujeres? Cuando pasas por la aduana, revisan todas tus pertenencias. Entonces, si tuviéramos algo sospechoso, definitivamente tendrían preguntas. ¿Por qué un hombre tendría perfume para mujeres en su equipaje?

AP: Incluso una persona ordinaria tendría preguntas. ¿Por qué un hombre necesitaría perfume para las mujeres?

MS: ¿Dónde vería una persona común que tienes una botella de perfume?

RB: Quiero decir, cuando pasas por la aduana …

MS: Para resumir, ¿tenías esa botella de Nina Ricci o no?

RB: No.

AP: No, por supuesto que no.

MS: Hablando de hombres heterosexuales, todo el metraje los presenta a ustedes dos juntos. Pasaron tiempo juntos, vivieron juntos, salieron a caminar juntos. ¿Qué tienen en común que pasan tanto tiempo juntos?

RB: Sabes, no rompamos la privacidad de nadie. Buscamos protección, pero esto se está convirtiendo en una especie de interrogatorio. Estamos yendo demasiado lejos. Buscamos protección para usted. No nos estás interrogando.

MS: Somos periodistas, no protegemos. No somos abogados De hecho, esta fue mi próxima pregunta. ¿Por qué decidiste ir a los medios? Tus fotos fueron publicadas hace un tiempo junto con tus nombres, pero te mantienes en silencio. Hoy me llamaste porque querías hablar con los medios. Why?

RB: Para pedir protección.

AP: Dices que nos mantuvimos en silencio. Después de que nuestras vidas se convirtieron en una pesadilla, no sabíamos qué hacer, a dónde ir. ¿Policía? Comité de Investigacion? Embajada del Reino Unido?

RB: O FSB. No lo sabíamos

MS: ¿Por qué ir a la Embajada del Reino Unido?

AP: Realmente no sabíamos qué hacer. ¿Dónde ir? ¿Hola?

RB: Sabes, cuando tu vida se da vuelta, realmente no entiendes qué hacer y dónde ir. Y muchos dicen, ¿por qué no vas a la Embajada del Reino Unido y explicas todo?

MS: Y sabes lo que dicen sobre ti, ¿verdad?

AP: Por supuesto que sí.

RB: Sí, por supuesto. We can't go out on the street because we are scared. We're afraid.

MS: What are you afraid of?

RB: We fear for our lives. And for the lives of our families and friends.

MS: So, you fear that the UK secret service will kill you or what?

RB: We just don't know.

AP: Simply read what they write there. They even offer a reward.

MS: What do you mean? There's a bounty on your head?

RB: Dmitry Gudkov, if I am not mistaken, promised a trip to the UK to anybody who brings us to him. Do you think it's OK? And you think we can feel just fine, walking around all smiling, talking to people? Any sensible person would be afraid'.

Body language expert Judy James says Russian novichok assassins looked anxious and stressed during interview in which they claimed they were just tourists

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

Petrov sits slightly slumped rather than in a more alert, pleading style as you might do if you were trying to convince people of your innocent role. His arms and hands are hidden below the table.

Esto se puede usar como una versión corporal de una "cara de póker", cuando alguien desea esconder sus manos en caso de que le den las señales incorrectas, pero también puede ser un deseo de esconderse y sentirse protegido por la barrera de la mesa.

Its characteristic of turning the chair from one side to another is interesting, since it could indicate nervousness or it could suggest a much more impatient impatience and anger. His eyes remain nailed to the interviewer in most of the clip with what looks like a confident and penetrating look.

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

When he closes his eyes and nods his head for an affirmative answer, his emphatic facial gestures suggest power instead of submission.

When we are in a state of stress or anxiety our blink rate often increases as the adrenalin of fear kicks in. Petrov's blink rate looks extremely slow here though. At one point he makes almost five turns of his chair between blinks and this might suggest again the inner strength or confidence.

When they tell him they are nervous, his upper lip seems to rise in a small grunt, as if the accusation bothers him or the fact that his nerves have been driven by events bothers him.

What were they doing in Salisbury? His eyes turn to the right, which may suggest creative thinking, although he might have looked in that direction because he knew his friend was about to start his travel journal on the beautiful views of Salisbury.

Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov (right) have been accused by the British police of being two Russian spies (in the photos of their passports)

Boshirov is much more active during the video and also shows more symptoms of what might be nervousness. His first pose is generally superficially safer, leaning back in his chair with his elbows on his arms in a light play of control, but the movement of his upper chest suggests a quick and shallow breathing that can occur when someone feels under pressure.

His blink rate is also much faster than his friend's and he takes several large swallows that can also be triggered by stress or anxiety.

He takes action when accused of appearing "nervous", leaning forward with both arms on the table, shrugging his shoulders before joining his fingers and forming a bell gesture with his thumbs, which is usually a sign of power or status .

Apparently frustrated, he snorts and shrugs his shoulders before sitting down and leaving a hand on the table.

Your monologue of & # 39; guide & # 39; Salisbury comes after a deep breath and a forward look as if he is accessing an internal script in his head.

Novichok 'assassins' may be LOVERS who were on a romantic trip to Britain when the Skripals were poisoned in Salisbury, Russian media claims

The Russian media suggested that Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov were on a gay trip to Britain to help back up their bizarre story.

One online news portal even started a poll asking readers whether the pair were 'agents made to be gays or gays made to be agents'.

The speculation began when they were asked by RT: 'Speaking about normal men, on the (CCTV) video you are shown always together. You were together, lived together, walked everywhere together. What does in fact connect you?'

Boshirov replied: 'Let's not pry into our private lives.'

When online speculation began over their sexuality, interviewer 38 year old Margarita Simonyan – who is head of the Kremlin 'propaganda' channel – retorted: 'I do not know if they are gays or not.

'They are quite fashionable – with little beards, hair cuts, tight pants, sweaters tight over big biceps. They did not harass me. Anyway I'm already out of the harassable age.

She added: 'During the interview I told them that the world least of all worries with the question if they slept in one bed or not'

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