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Lauren Blake (photo), 19, from Southampton, has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that affects her joints and mobility

A teenager has revealed the heartache of suffering from a rare disease that disrupts her joints up to 80 times a day.

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Lauren Blake, 19, from Southampton, has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that affects her joints and mobility.

Diagnosed with the condition in November 2016, it causes the Girl Guide Unit Leader to be in constant pain while disrupting her joints while showering, brushing her teeth and even while sitting in her wheelchair.

Lauren also suffers from gastroparesis, as a result of which the nerves in the stomach no longer work properly and must receive tube feeding 20 hours a day.

The circumstances have negated the teenager's hope to become a primary school teacher after she had to stop an Open University course because she was in too much pain to study.

Lauren Blake (photo), 19, from Southampton, has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that affects her joints and mobility

Lauren Blake (photo), 19, from Southampton, has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that affects her joints and mobility

Diagnosed with the condition in November 2016, it leaves the Girl Guide Unit Leader (photo) in constant pain
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Diagnosed with the condition in November 2016, it leaves the Girl Guide Unit Leader (photo) in constant pain

Diagnosed with the condition in November 2016, it leaves the Girl Guide Unit Leader (photo) in constant pain

Speaking of her condition, Lauren said The sun: & # 39; When I walk to the toilet every morning, I will dislocate a knee joint or my hip will pop out while brushing my teeth.

Zonder Without curing this remedy, it was difficult to come to terms with my diagnosis, especially since my friends only had GCSE and the school ball was delivered.

She added: & # 39; Usually my EDS is frustrating because it makes me miss so much. It was disturbing when I saw (my friends) go to college while staying at home.

& # 39; I can't go out to dinner or have a drink and dance with my friends, so it's hard to meet people and I'm single now. Keeping a job is also difficult. & # 39;

Lauren (photo) also suffers from gastroparesis, as a result of which the nerves in the stomach no longer work properly and must receive tube feeding 20 hours a day

Lauren (photo) also suffers from gastroparesis, as a result of which the nerves in the stomach no longer work properly and must receive tube feeding 20 hours a day

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Lauren (photo) also suffers from gastroparesis, as a result of which the nerves in the stomach no longer work properly and must receive tube feeding 20 hours a day

Lauren enjoys some activities during a trip with girl guides

Lauren enjoys some activities during a trip with girl guides

Despite the constant pain she feels, Lauren one day hopes to figure out how to live and work around her EDS and tries not to stop her

Despite the constant pain she feels, Lauren one day hopes to figure out how to live and work around her EDS and tries not to stop her

Despite the constant pain she feels, Lauren (photo on the left on a journey by Girl Guides) hopes that one day she will figure out how to live and work around her EDS and tries not to stop her

Circumstances have undermined the teenager's hope of becoming a primary school teacher after she had to stop an Open University course because she was in too much pain to study

Circumstances have undermined the teenager's hope of becoming a primary school teacher after she had to stop an Open University course because she was in too much pain to study

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Circumstances have undermined the teenager's hope of becoming a primary school teacher after she had to stop an Open University course because she was in too much pain to study

Lauren suffered from her first dislocation in June 2013, when she was only 13.

WHAT IS EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME?

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is the name for a group of rare hereditary disorders that affect connective tissue.

Connective tissues support skin, tendons, ligaments, blood vessels, internal organs and bones.

Symptoms can vary from immobility to hypermobility, an increased amount of movement in joints, as well as fragile skin, frequent dislocation of joints, digestive problems and heart problems.

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The different types of EDS are caused by errors in certain genes that make connective tissue weaker.

EDS can influence people in different ways. For some, the condition is relatively mild, while for others it can eliminate their symptoms. Some of the rare serious species can be life threatening.

Source: NHS

The teenager was jumping at her high school and as she landed, she heard a bang in her knee and screamed in pain.

Her leg was bent at a strange angle and she was rushed to Southampton General Hospital, where a doctor manipulated the joint back into place under local anesthesia.

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Initially, doctors assumed that Lauren had landed awkwardly, but five months later it happened again while she was skiing.

In March 2014, the boy walked on to a bus when her knee dislocated, before her shoulder popped out while she watched television a few days later.

Doctors assured her parents Jane, 54, a stock auditor, and Andrew, 56, a chef, that it was simply dealing with growing pains, according to Lauren.

But after examining her symptoms, including digestive problems, she came across Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS).

In November 2016 she was finally diagnosed.

Despite the constant pain she feels, Lauren hopes one day to figure out how to live and work around her EDS.

The teenager said she would like to fulfill her teacher dreams and still enjoys light activities such as volunteering with the Girl Guides.

Lauren (recently pictured) suffered her first disruption in June 2013, when she was only 13

Lauren (recently pictured) suffered her first disruption in June 2013, when she was only 13

Lauren (recently pictured) suffered her first disruption in June 2013, when she was only 13

WHAT IS GASTROPARESIS?

Gastroparesis influences the normal movements of the muscles in the stomach, so that it cannot be emptied properly.

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To a certain extent, it affects more than 1.5 million people in the US. Up to four percent of people suffer in the UK.

Because of the condition that affects digestion, it can cause nausea and vomiting, as well as problems with people's blood sugar levels and receiving adequate nutrition.

Other symptoms may include:

  • A full feeling after eating a few bites
  • Acid reflux
  • Swollen abdomen and pain
  • Weight loss
  • Lack of appetite

Gastroparesis can occur as a complication of diabetes, or after surgery or an infection.

It is believed that it is caused by damage to a nerve that controls the abs.

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Certain medications, such as antidepressants or painkillers, can delay gastric emptying and cause similar symptoms.

Complications can be: severe dehydration due to vomiting, malnutrition, a reduced quality of life and undigested food hardening in the stomach, which can be life threatening.

There is no medicine. Treatment is focused on dietary changes, such as eating smaller meals more often and chewing thoroughly.

Medications can help relieve nausea and vomiting.

Surgery to fit a probe may be necessary if patients cannot tolerate food or fluids.

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Source: Mayo Clinic

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