Teen Juul addiction of four pods a day drove him to sell his clothes for his habit of $ 150 a week

Luka Kinard started to flee at the age of 14, immediately after he went to high school in September 2017.

The teenager from High Point, North Carolina, noticed that his classmates used the popular e-cigarette Juul and he wanted to pass.

He was addicted in a few months.

He pushed an average of four pods a day for almost a year, both at home and at school. His figures began to slip and he even began to sell his clothes to fuel his habit, which cost him $ 150 a week.

Finally, in the summer of 2018, the 15-year-old got an attack, forcing his parents to recognize the severity of his addiction and find a treatment center to help their son clean up nicotine.

Luka Kinard, 15 (photo), from High Point, North Carolina, began to fume when he went to high school in September 2017 to join other students

Luka (photo) has formed four Juul pods per day, a habit that cost him $ 150 a week

Luka (photo) has formed four Juul pods per day, a habit that cost him $ 150 a week

Luka Kinard, 15 (left and right), from High Point, North Carolina, began to fume when he went to high school in September 2017 to adapt to other students. He formed four Juul pods a day, a habit that cost him $ 150 a week to refuel

His parents say his figures have slipped, he lost interest in activities and started to get violent outbursts. Pictured: Luka

His parents say his figures have slipped, he lost interest in activities and started to get violent outbursts. Pictured: Luka

His parents say his figures have slipped, he lost interest in activities and started to get violent outbursts. Pictured: Luka

Juul's original nicotine pods contain about the same amount of nicotine as a pack of 20 cigarettes.

Nicotine is toxic in high doses. It increases blood pressure and heart rate and can irritate the eyes and the respiratory tract.

Nicotine also causes the brain to release dopamine throughout the body, leading to addiction and the body increasingly longing for satisfaction.

The addictive chemical can change the electrical signals between your brain and the nervous system, which can cause an attack.

Juul is the most popular brand for e-cigarettes and currently controls about 70 percent of the e-cigarettes market.

It has a slim USB-like design and is available in different flavors, experts say they are marketed for teenagers and can fuel tobacco addiction.

Luka told The Wall Street Journal that his favorite flavors were mango and menthol

He said it cost him $ 150 a week to keep up with his habit, and he became so desperate to get his solution that he began to sell his clothes.

I would buy shoes, sell them, buy cheap shoes, sell & # 39 ;, he told NBC News.

& # 39; I did everything and everything to get money. When I spent $ 17 every four days or every day, it was a problem. & # 39;

WHAT IS IN A JUDE POD AND WHY IS IT SO POTENT?

Like most e-cigarettes, Juuls works by evaporating liquefied nicotine salts, flavorings and preservatives.

The nicotine salts are the key to the potential of a Juul pod.

Juul says that each of the original six percent nicotine pods contains about the same amount of nicotine as a pack of 20 cigarettes.

Cigarettes and Juul vapor are inhaled and the nicotine inside is absorbed differently, making this comparison difficult.

The nicotine salts & # 39; in Juul pods contain a more intense burst of nicotine that hits a vaper, similar to cigarette smoke.

Nicotine is absorbed very quickly, with a "freebase" effect such as smoking.

But some cigarette smoke is lost along the way to the lungs, is absorbed into the filter or disappears outside the mouth of the smoker.

For this reason Juul users can even get a higher dose of nicotine than even cigarette smokers.

Luka's mother, Kelly, said that her son also began to experience various behavioral problems.

"He went from a regular student to an F-student," she told the network.

& # 39;[It was] a very rapid decline in numbers. His behavior became explosive. He was very angry and he just was not. & # 39;

The first-year student at the time lost interest in all his after-school activities and hobbies, apart from the birds.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 percent of high and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2017.

It is a huge peak of 1.5 percent of high school students who tried e-cigarettes in 2011.

Juul has started offering pods containing only three percent nicotine – half of the original – to circumvent the FDA regulations and has reduced the majority of its flavors.

However, the US Surgeon General has classified the use of e-cigarettes by young people as an "epidemic."

Cases took a turn last summer when Luka was attacked, which may be caused by severe exposure to nicotine, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers.

After receiving an attack in the summer of 2018, Luka's mom Kelly (photo) took him to a rehabilitation clinic in California to help him to give up his habit

After receiving an attack in the summer of 2018, Luka's mom Kelly (photo) took him to a rehabilitation clinic in California to help him to give up his habit

After receiving an attack in the summer of 2018, Luka's mom Kelly (photo) took him to a rehabilitation clinic in California to help him to give up his habit

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 percent of high and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2017

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 percent of high and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2017

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 percent of high and high school students used e-cigarettes in 2017

He was at his friend's house and an ambulance was called and he landed on first aid, & # 39; said Kelly.

Through online research, she discovered that nicotine addiction should be treated as a problem with substance abuse, so she went in search of a suitable treatment center.

In the summer of 2018, Luka spent 40 days at a California rehabilitation center run by the Center for Discovery.

His family told The Journal that his program consisted of regular meetings with therapists, drugs were prescribed for anxiety and dealing with medication such as listening to music or writing.

& # 39; Treatment teaches you ways to just say no, & # 39; said Luka to the newspaper.

His grades have improved since he stopped and he is again at reconnaissance meetings.

Kelly recommends that other parents pay attention if their child exhibits similar behavior.

& # 39; They must respond quickly. And they should be treated as soon as possible for their children, "she told NBC News.

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