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Fact: in diabetes, the islet cells no longer stop producing insulin, or the output drops

Tea bag with insulin cells can beat diabetes by controlling blood sugar levels

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A small & # 39; tea bag & # 39; implant could change the treatment of diabetes.

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The device contains millions of islet cells harvested from deceased donors. These cells are found in the pancreas and produce insulin, which controls blood sugar levels.

With diabetes, the islet cells no longer stop producing insulin at all, or production falls sharply.

Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by the immune system that attacks the insulin-producing cells. It is treated with insulin jabs. Type 2 is more common and is associated with obesity.

Fact: in diabetes, the islet cells no longer stop producing insulin, or the output drops

Fact: in diabetes, the islet cells no longer stop producing insulin, or the output drops

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Although it can be controlled by lifestyle changes and tablets such as metformin, which lower blood sugar, the longer a person has the chance that he will eventually also need insulin injections.

If blood sugar levels are not under control, this can cause irreversible damage to the kidneys, eyes, nerves, heart and large blood vessels.

The idea behind the implant is that the cells in the & # 39; tea bag & # 39; replace the damaged or worn out islet cells of the patient.

This is a new way to perform island cell transplants that have been performed on the NHS in the last decade.

These transplants dramatically reduce the amount of insulin patients need and the number of & # 39; hypo & # 39; s & # 39 ;: potentially life-threatening episodes in which blood sugar levels suddenly plummet.

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On average, islet cell transplants decrease from once every two weeks to once a year because they provide a constant, even amount of insulin instead of the & # 39; spikes & # 39; that you get with jabs.

But many patients are put off by the fact that they have to use medication for the rest of their lives to prevent their bodies from the & # 39; strange & # 39; cells, which can have side effects such as diarrhea, nausea and an increased risk of infection (because the immune system is & # 39; rejected & # 39;).

The new technique reduces the risk that the body's immune system rejects the transplant.

Although diabetes can be controlled by lifestyle changes and tablets such as metformin, which lowers blood sugar, the longer it takes for someone to receive insulin injections.

Although diabetes can be controlled by lifestyle changes and tablets such as metformin, which lowers blood sugar, the longer it takes for someone to receive insulin injections.

Although diabetes can be controlled by lifestyle changes and tablets such as metformin, which lowers blood sugar, the longer it takes for someone to receive insulin injections.

HOW CAN DIABETES LEAD TO FOOT AMPUTS?

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People with diabetes are much more likely to amputate their toes or feet because their injuries do not heal normally.

A high blood sugar level can cause nerve damage, which means that patients cannot feel their skin well and may not know when they have a wound or feel how serious it is.

And diabetes restricts blood circulation in the legs, which slows healing because oxygen and nutrients are scarce.

The combination of these two factors means that it can take longer for people to get over injuries and the healing period means there is more chance that it will get infected or that meat will die from gangrene.

If an injury becomes too infected or untreatable, the affected part of the body may need to be cut off.

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Source: American Podiatric Medicine Association

The & # 39; tea bag & # 39; implant, about the size of a 5 p piece, is implanted next to the liver It is made of a special silicone that acts as a sieve. The small holes are just big enough to allow insulin to seep through, but too small to let in larger immune cells that can attack the cells of the strange island.

A miniature oxygen pump is attached to the side of the tea bag to provide the donated islet cells with oxygen they need.

Researchers from the University of Arizona are planning to conduct human testing over the next four years.

& # 39; It's like a tea bag & # 39 ;, said lead researcher Dr. Klearchos Papas. & # 39; The tea leaves (ie the islet cells) stay inside, but tea (insulin) comes out. & # 39;

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Dr. Martin Rutter, clinical leader of the island cell transplant project at the NHS Foundation Trust of the University of Manchester, said: & # 39; This technology could be a game-changer for anyone dependent on insulin, especially those with type 1 diabetes. that cannot be managed with conventional insulin therapy.

& # 39; But we need the results of carefully conducted clinical trials before they are made available to patients in the clinic. & # 39;

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