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Darren Ward Gale was previously found guilty of the murder of Noel Joseph Ingham in July 2016, 58 (photo), on the estate they shared in Ulverstone, on the north coast of the state.

The murderer who cut off his roommate's head before he threw it off a bridge and buried the rest of his body in bushland begs the judge to file a minimum sentence

  • Darren Ward Gale was confronted with a pre-penalty tournament at the Supreme Court in Hobart
  • His lawyer asked for a minimum non-parole period during a hearing on Friday
  • Gale was found guilty of the murder of his roommate Noel Joseph Ingham in 2016
  • Mr. Ingham's head was cut off and thrown from a bridge and buried
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A man found guilty of beheading his roommate and burying his body in the bushland has asked the judge to give him a minimum non-parole period.

Darren Ward Gale, 53, filed the request at a pre-jurisdictional hearing at the Supreme Court in Hobart, Tasmania, on Friday.

He was previously found guilty of the murder of Noel Joseph Ingham in July 2016, 58, at the premises they shared in Ulverstone, on the north coast of the state, The Mercury reported.

During his seven-week trial, he told the court that Mr. Ingham had been drunk and slapped his head against the aquarium in the living room, giving him a & # 39; big cut & # 39; got to sleep and made him stop breathing.

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Darren Ward Gale was previously found guilty of the murder of Noel Joseph Ingham in July 2016, 58 (photo), on the estate they shared in Ulverstone, on the north coast of the state.

Darren Ward Gale was previously found guilty of the murder of Noel Joseph Ingham in July 2016, 58 (photo), on the estate they shared in Ulverstone, on the north coast of the state.

& # 39; Blood was flowing everywhere. I picked it up, but it was too heavy and we fell to the floor. He took a deep breath and I thought, "Jesus Christ, I don't know what to do," Gale said to the court.

Gale told the court that he decided to clean up & # 39; & # 39; and remove the body from the property.

But before he lost the remains of his roommate, he also drowned Mr Igham's two dogs, the court heard.

He then placed the dead dogs, Mr. Igham's body, and a bicycle in his roommate's car and drove to Dulverton, south of Ulverstone, and dug an improvised grave.

Gale initially pleaded not guilty of the murder, but admitted that he was trying to hide the remains of Ingham because he & # 39; was afraid of being accused of murder & # 39 ;.

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Gale said his way of thinking focused on getting rid of & # 39; everything & # 39; and as a result, he told the court: & # 39; I decided to take his head off. & # 39;

Crown prosecutor Jackie Hartnett refuted Gale & # 39; s claims and instead suggested that he had hit his roommate in the head and killed him – allegations Gale strongly denied.

During the Friday prior hearing, Gale & # 39; s lawyer Greg Richardson argued for a minimum non-pooling period and claimed that Gale would not pose a threat to society as he grew older.

& # 39; He will certainly not be a danger to anyone in the community in the late sixties. & # 39;

He went on to contest the evidence that there was not enough to satisfy a court without reasonable doubt that the murder had been premeditated.

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Mr. Richardson also questioned the impact statements of victims of Mr. Ingham's children, which he noted had had little contact with their father over the past decade.

Crown prosecutor Jackie Hartnett argued that only meant that his three children were unable to reconnect due to the death of their father.

& # 39; That opportunity was clearly lost. It is something they will have to live with, but it is clearly not that they have ensured that this possibility has been taken away from them. & # 39;

Gale will be sentenced on August 2.

During the Friday prior hearing, Gale & # 39; s lawyer Greg Richardson argued for a minimum non-pooling period and claimed that Gale would not pose a threat to society as he grew older

During the Friday prior hearing, Gale & # 39; s lawyer Greg Richardson argued for a minimum non-pooling period and claimed that Gale would not pose a threat to society as he grew older

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During the Friday prior hearing, Gale & # 39; s lawyer Greg Richardson argued for a minimum non-pooling period and claimed that Gale would not pose a threat to society as he grew older

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