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Tarantula shakes and kicks off its old skin in time-lapse images that make your meat crawl

Squirming tarantula shakes and kicks off its old skin in time-lapse images that make your meat crawl

  • Kieran Brant, from the UK, filmed Brazilian white knee tarantula shaking his skin
  • Time-lapse video shows the spin that vibrates to reveal a fresh new layer
  • Tarantulas shed to refresh hair on their legs that are used to detect vibrations

A tarantula is caught on the camera and shakes off its old skin in a strenuous shedding.

Incredible time-lapse shots show that the Brazilian white-knee tarantula shakes his skin completely while shaking it intensely.

The creature lies on the ground and pushes upwards while the old layer comes off its body.

The spider uses his legs to ensure that he has shed his skin completely and then seems to complete the change by kicking him away.

The Brazilian whitekee then begins to stretch its legs and get used to the fresh skin before the time-lapse ends.

Tarantulas shed to refresh the sensory hairs at the end of their legs that are used to detect odors, tastes and vibrations.

Spiders can even regenerate missing legs during the peeling process. According to Tarantulagude.com, before the tarantula starts to shed, it undergoes various other physical changes.

Kieran Brant filmed his Brazilian white-knee tarantula that shook his skin in a time-lapse video

Kieran Brant filmed his Brazilian white-knee tarantula that shook his skin in a time-lapse video

A bald spot on the spider’s belly becomes larger and the skin underneath changes from pink to black.

The tarantula can stop eating completely and the spider will stay two weeks before the moulting process starts.

Kieran Brant filmed the spider and said: ‘I decided to record this video, because this is our male tarantula and the first in our collection is very dear to us.

The spider is seen and pushes the old skin into the air before it is completely shaken to reveal a new one

The spider is seen and pushes the old skin into the air before it is completely shaken to reveal a new one

The spider is seen and pushes the old skin into the air before it is completely shaken to reveal a new one

At the end of the clip the tarantula (right) has a new skin and the old one (left) still looks intact

At the end of the clip the tarantula (right) has a new skin and the old one (left) still looks intact

At the end of the clip the tarantula (right) has a new skin and the old one (left) still looks intact

‘Unfortunately, male tarantulas do not survive long after they have fallen.

“This was our first tarantula that we bought two years ago. We now have 180+ tarantulas and have started breeding projects. We also have many other reptiles and inverts in our collection. “

Kieran has a YouTube channel, Alternative Inverts, in which he documents the lives of his bird spiders.

WHY DID TARANTULAS LEAVE THEIR SKIN?

Tarantulas have a rigid outer shell known as an exoskeleton that protects the internal organs of the spider.

But to get bigger, they have to dispose of their previous exoskeleton and grow a new one.

To do this, the tarantula must contract its abdomen and push fluid into the upper body. It does this several times in its life.

Before the tarantula begins to shed, it undergoes various other physical changes.

A bald spot on the spider’s belly becomes larger and the skin underneath changes from pink to black.

The eating habits of the tarantula also change in the run-up to shedding.

The tarantula stops eating completely and stays for two weeks before it melts.

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