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Talking to young children slowly and exaggeratedly helps them develop language.

Conversations about babies: talking to young children in a slow, acute and exaggerated way really helps them develop language skills, studies say

  • One study finds that talking to small babies in & # 39; parentese & # 39; It helps them learn new words
  • Parentese is not talking about baby, but talking long and exaggerated using real words
  • A team from the USA UU. He discovered that babies who participated in parentese knew more words at 18 months

Parents may feel self-conscious, but talking to a baby with a silly voice could really help them learn.

A study of 71 families analyzed "parentese", the slow, sharp and cheerful voice in which many parents talk to their babies.

He found that the children with whom he spoke in this way were the ones who knew the most appropriate words like "banana" and "dog" at 18 months.

Experts used to think that this way of speaking worsened them by learning the language.

But recent evidence shows that talking with a child slowly and happily captures their attention, which can make them relate more to their parents and try to imitate their speech.

& # 39; Parentese & # 39; It's not the same as baby talk, which tends to be un grammatical and includes invented meaningless words

& # 39; Parentese & # 39; It's not the same as baby talk, which tends to be un grammatical and includes invented meaningless words

The key to really working seems to be paying attention to a child and responding to what he is looking at or trying to say.

The researchers recruited six-month-old babies and their parents, randomly assigning 47 of them to receive advice on the importance of kinship.

Those who learned about parentese and used it more frequently said that their children knew a little more than 99 words on average at 18 months of age.

HOW TO TALK & # 39; FATHER & # 39;

Parentese is a type of speech in which an adult talks to a child in an exaggerated or repetitive way.

It is supposed that speaking to a baby in a parental way should make them look at you and get involved with gurgling and giggling.

These first conversations between parents and children help babies learn how to communicate with others and learn words.

Parents who talk with their children are encouraged to describe what the baby is doing or even ask them questions.

Although the baby does not need to understand what the father says, he or she can participate in the conversation, even in the form of incoherent noises.

When parents were asked not to receive training, those who used less parentage, to indicate how many words their 18-month-old child knew from a list of about 600, they said the child only knew 64 on average.

Professor Patricia Kuhl, lead author of the Washington University study in Seattle, said: ‘We believe that parentage facilitates language learning due to its simpler linguistic structure and exaggerated sounds.

& # 39; But this new work suggests a more fundamental reason.

"Now we believe that parentese works because it is a social hook for the baby's brain: its high tone and slower rhythm are socially attractive and invite the baby to respond."

Parentese is not the same as baby talk, which tends to be un grammatical and includes invented meaningless words.

It uses precise words and grammar, but says with a voice almost an octave higher, with exaggerated facial expressions and long vowels that make the phonetic sounds of the letters easier to understand.

Social commitment to a baby through language is crucial to promote their initial response noises and meaningless noises, which turn into words and then into sentences

Social commitment to a baby through language is crucial to promote their initial response noises and meaningless noises, which turn into words and then into sentences

Social commitment to a baby through language is crucial to promote their initial response noises and meaningless noises, which turn into words and then into sentences

A 1985 study from the University of Oregon found that young babies are more likely to turn their heads toward a speaker who listens to this type of speech than one who speaks in an adult conversation.

The last study trained parents about the benefits of kinship, giving them feedback on their own speech, when their child was six, 10, and 14 months old.

To verify if this helped the children to communicate, the babies were recorded during a single weekend four times between six and 18 months of age, using a tape recorder inside their vest.

Taking a random snapshot of 100 time intervals that last 30 seconds each, the researchers calculated how much the children talked at 18 months.

Those whose parents had been taught to use parentese spoke almost half the time, while those whose parents did not receive training spoke less than a quarter of the time.

Round-trip conversations are an important indicator that children are learning the language, and these exchanges increased by almost two-thirds for children whose parents had learned to use parentage between the ages of 14 and 18 months.

For those whose parents had been lost, the increase was only 42.5 percent.

The study, published in the magazine. procedures of the National Academy of Sciences, showed that parents who received training increased the presence of parentese in their speech from 56.7 to 63.7 percent.

Professor Kuhl said: lenguaje The language evolved to facilitate social communication skills that are essential for the survival of the species.

"In this study, we observe firsthand how the language and social commitment of parents can promote the initial receptive coos of the baby, which become words and then sentences, educating babies in the art of human communication" .

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