Taliban say they are ‘angry’ and feel ‘betrayed’ after US takes out helicopters and planes

Taliban fighters feel ‘angry’ and ‘betrayed’ after they learned that the US had disabled military helicopters and planes before leaving Kabul.

According to the commander of the US evacuation mission, General Frank McKenzie, US troops ‘demilitarized’ 73 aircraft this week before taking off.

That left up to 48 aircraft in the hands of the terror group, although it was not known how many were operational.

But the Taliban had “expected the Americans to leave such helicopters whole for use,” according to a reporter Al Jazeera reporter who toured the airport after the withdrawal.

She said, ‘When I said to them, ‘Why do you think the Americans would have left everything operational for you?’ They said because we believe it is a national asset and we are now the government and this could have served us well.”

She added: “They are disappointed, they are angry, they feel betrayed because all this equipment is broken beyond repair.”

Taliban fighters feel “angered” and “betrayed” after learning that the US had disabled military helicopters and planes before leaving Kabul. Pictured: A helicopter with a Taliban flag flies over supporters

A Taliban member looks up next to a damaged helicopter at Kabul airport after US withdrawal

A Taliban member looks up next to a damaged helicopter at Kabul airport after US withdrawal

A Taliban member looks up next to a damaged helicopter at Kabul airport after US withdrawal

According to the commander of the US evacuation mission, General Frank McKenzie, US troops 'demilitarized' 73 aircraft this week before their departure.

According to the commander of the US evacuation mission, General Frank McKenzie, US troops 'demilitarized' 73 aircraft this week before taking off.

According to the commander of the US evacuation mission, General Frank McKenzie, US troops ‘demilitarized’ 73 aircraft this week before taking off.

The Taliban hope to have the commercial side of the airport up and running within days, allowing Afghans to fly out of the country on visas.

Along with the plane, the US left up to 200 civilians, 70 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles and 27 Humvees in Afghanistan.

According to an official US government inspection on June 30, the Afghan Air Force operated 167 aircraft, including 108 helicopters and 59 aircraft.

Before Kabul fell, Uzbekistan confirmed that 46 Afghan aircraft, including 24 helicopters, had arrived in the country to avoid falling into Taliban hands.

The commander of the US evacuation mission, General Frank McKenzie, said US troops knocked out 73 planes before finally leaving the country Monday night.

The Taliban hope to have the commercial side of the airport up and running within days, allowing Afghans to fly out of the country on visas

The Taliban hope to have the commercial side of the airport up and running within days, allowing Afghans to fly out of the country on visas

The Taliban hope to have the commercial side of the airport up and running within days, allowing Afghans to fly out of the country on visas

A US-made $6 million UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flies over a convoy of Taliban fighters en route to fight resistance in the Panjshir Valley on Wednesday

A US-made $6 million UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flies over a convoy of Taliban fighters en route to fight resistance in the Panjshir Valley on Wednesday

A Black Hawk being flown by the Taliban today

A Black Hawk being flown by the Taliban today

A US-made $6 million UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter flies over a convoy of Taliban fighters en route to fight resistance in the Panjshir Valley on Wednesday

Propellers and guns were removed from planes and helicopters, while other planes had their fuselages directly on the tarmac because their wheels had been removed rendering them unusable.

As a result, as many as 48 planes have been seized by the Taliban, although it is unclear what the malfunction is in terms of planes and helicopters, or what state these planes are in.

Many were built in the 1980s and require constant maintenance and parts to ensure they are airworthy, let alone combat capable.

In recent months, the jihadists have captured 10 major airports from Bagram to Mazar-i-Sharif and taken to the skies in a $6 million Black Hawk helicopter in their fight against resistance in the Panjshir Valley.

An A-29 attack plane is surrounded by equipment left behind by western forces as they retreated from Kabul airport

An A-29 attack plane is surrounded by equipment left behind by western forces as they retreated from Kabul airport

An A-29 attack plane is surrounded by equipment left behind by western forces as they retreated from Kabul airport

A-29 attack aircraft that appear largely intact can be seen alongside a vast amount of Western body armor and tactical helmets left behind by retreating troops

A-29 attack aircraft that appear largely intact can be seen alongside a vast amount of Western body armor and tactical helmets left behind by retreating troops

A-29 attack aircraft that appear largely intact can be seen alongside a vast amount of Western body armor and tactical helmets left behind by retreating troops

Footage uploaded to social media shows Taliban fighters driving armored vehicles through Kandahar after defeating US-backed Afghan National Army

Footage uploaded to social media shows Taliban fighters driving armored vehicles through Kandahar after defeating US-backed Afghan National Army

Footage uploaded to social media shows Taliban fighters driving armored vehicles through Kandahar after defeating US-backed Afghan National Army

Taliban chiefs allegedly ordered their troops to track down pilots of the disbanded Afghan Air Force, who received expensive training from the US and its allies to fly high-tech fighter jets and helicopters.

Without those pilots, it’s nearly impossible for an amateur to fly such sophisticated aircraft — but several videos of terrorists in the air suggest they must have recruited some renegade wingmen.

Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul was seized on Tuesday by triumphant jihadists who climbed into the cockpit of a $14 million Hercules transport plane, though it clearly overturned, suggesting the wheels were broken.

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