Taliban ‘banned women ministry of women’s affairs’

Taliban ‘banned women ministry of women’s affairs’

  • Taliban Banned Female Staff From Women’s Affairs Ministry Today
  • Department replaced by the ‘morality police’ and the building signs swapped
  • Female personnel were allowed to enter the building in the Afghan capital, Kabul. do not enter










The Taliban have banned female staff from entering the Ministry of Women’s Affairs in Kabul.

The Islamists, who took control of Afghanistan last month amid the chaos following the withdrawal of US troops, today locked women out of the building and replaced the department with the ‘morality police’.

Workers in the Afghan capital covered the women’s ministry signs with a replacement in a mixture of Dari and Arabic that read “Ministries of Prayer and Guidance and the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice.”

Female employees said they had been trying to get to work for several weeks but were told to return home, according to videos filmed outside the building and viewed by Reuters.

On Thursday, the gates of the building were finally locked, one of the women said. A senior Taliban leader said earlier this week that women should not work with men in ministries.

The Taliban has banned female staff from entering the Ministry of Women’s Affairs in Kabul and replaced the department with the ‘morality police’ (pictured, women protest for their rights in front of the presidential palace in Kabul)

Working in the Afghan capital covered women's ministry signs for a replacement in a medley of Dari and Arabic, reading 'Ministries of Prayer and Guidance and the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice'

Working in the Afghan capital covered women’s ministry signs for a replacement in a medley of Dari and Arabic, reading ‘Ministries of Prayer and Guidance and the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice’

“I’m the only breadwinner in my family,” said a second woman, who also said she worked in the ward. “If there’s no ministry, what’s an Afghan woman to do?”

Taliban spokesmen did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Women gathered outside the presidential palace yesterday, calling on the Taliban to protect their rights and allow girls to study and work.

Despite insisting that they rule more moderately this time, the Taliban have not allowed women to return to work and have introduced rules on what they can wear in college.

A new Taliban government announced two weeks ago had no female members or even a ministry to represent their interests, but it did have an acting minister for the promotion of virtue and the prevention of vice.

While still marginalized, Afghan women have spent the past 20 years fighting for and acquiring basic rights, becoming legislators, judges, pilots and police officers.

Hundreds of thousands have gone to work — a necessity in some cases as many women were widowed or now support disabled husbands as a result of two decades of conflict.

But since coming to power on August 15, the Taliban have shown no inclination to respect those rights.

When urged, Taliban officials say women have been told to stay at home for their own safety, but will be allowed to work once proper segregation can be implemented.

The Islamists, who took control of Afghanistan last month amid the chaos following the withdrawal of US troops, today locked female staff outside the women's affair building as workers swapped signs at the department building.

The Islamists, who took control of Afghanistan last month amid the chaos following the withdrawal of US troops, today locked female staff outside the women’s affair building as workers swapped signs at the department building.

Taliban officials say women (pictured yesterday in Kabul) have been told to stay at home for their own safety but will be allowed to work once proper segregation can be implemented

Taliban officials say women (pictured yesterday in Kabul) have been told to stay at home for their own safety but will be allowed to work once proper segregation can be implemented

Meanwhile, the Taliban’s education ministry said today that all male students in grades six to 12 and male teachers must resume classes across Afghanistan, starting on Saturday.

But the statement published today on Facebook did not include girls of that age, and the lack of guidance highlighted ongoing concerns that the Taliban could impose restrictions on girls and women.

During the first rule of the Taliban from 1996 to 2001, women were largely barred from public life, including the prohibition to leave their homes unless accompanied by a male relative.

Enforcers from the Ministry for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Morals were known for thrashing women who walked alone.

They were also responsible for strictly applying other harsh interpretations of Islam, such as obligatory attendance at prayers and not cutting beards for men.

A new Taliban government announced two weeks ago had no female members or even a ministry to represent their interests, but included an acting minister for the promotion of virtue and the prevention of vice

A new Taliban government announced two weeks ago had no female members or even a ministry to represent their interests, but included an acting minister for the promotion of virtue and the prevention of vice

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