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Taking a siesta halves your chances of having a heart attack or stroke, a study suggests

Why it is good to take an afternoon nap: scientists find adults who sniffed twice a week a lower risk of a heart attack or stroke

  • Those who took a nap twice a week were 48% less likely to have a heart attack or stroke
  • Lack of sleep increases the risk of atherosclerosis, which accumulates in plaque in arteries
  • Scientists say that sweet spot is 8 hours of sleep a night, and napping helps getting there
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40 winks & grabbing in the afternoon halves your chances of having a heart attack or stroke, a study suggests.

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Researchers discovered that people who take a nap once or twice a week during the day are almost 50 percent less likely to be at risk compared to people who never sleep during the day.

But napping more than twice a week had no further health benefits for the heart, the study found.

Lack of sleep increases the risk of atherosclerosis, an accumulation of plaque in the blood vessels of the body causing them to narrow and harden.

Scientists say the place to sleep is eight hours a night. Doing can be a tool to help people reach that number if they missed it the night before.

Taking a siesta halves your chances of having a heart attack or stroke, a study suggests

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Taking a siesta halves your chances of having a heart attack or stroke, a study suggests

The research team at the University Hospital of Lausanne in Switzerland followed 3, 400 people aged 35 to 75 for an average of five years.

They looked at the association between nap frequency and average nap duration and the risk of a heart attack or stroke.

During the five years there were 155 heart attacks or strokes. Napping once or twice a week was associated with an almost halving of the risk (48 percent) compared to those who did not take a nap at all.

Study author Dr. Nadine Hausler said the team took into account possible factors that could influence the study.

WHAT IS INSOMNIA?

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Insomnia means that you regularly have sleeping problems. It usually gets better by changing your sleeping habits.

You have insomnia if you regularly: find it difficult to go to sleep, & # 39; wake up several times during the night, & # 39; lie awake at night, wake up early and cannot fall asleep, still be tired after waking up

Everyone needs different amounts of sleep. Adults need an average of 7 to 9 hours, while children need 9 to 13 hours.

You probably won't get enough sleep if you are constantly tired during the day.

The most common causes of insomnia are: stress, anxiety or depression, excessive noise, an uncomfortable bed or alcohol, caffeine or nicotine.

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Insomnia usually improves by changing your sleeping habits. For example, to go to bed at the same time each day and only go to bed when you are tired.

Source: NHS

Dr. Hausler, from the Lausanne University Hospital, said: “This association persisted after taking into account potentially influential factors such as age and nocturnal sleep duration, as well as other cardiovascular disease risks, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.

& # 39; And it did not change after taking into account excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, and regular sleep for at least six hours a night. & # 39;

She said that only people over 65 and severe sleep apnea still had a high risk of heart attack or stroke if they were regular nappers.

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Naveed Sattar, professor of Metabolic Medicine at the University of Glasgow, said that those who often took a nap during the week are generally healthier.

He added: “Those who take a nap once or twice a week have a healthier lifestyle or an organized life that allows them to take these naps, while those who take a nap almost every day are likely to be sicker.

& # 39; This means that the former pattern of occasional napping is intentional and the last of more regular naps probably represents a subclinical disease related to a poorer lifestyle. This would then explain the differential risks.

& # 39; I don't think anyone from this work can figure out or & # 39; intentional & nbsp; napping on one or two days a week improves heart health, so no one should infer that napping is a way to reduce their risk of heart attack – to prove that requires good tests, but I know not sure how feasible these would be.

& # 39; For now it is much better to strive for a normal good night's rest and follow the usual lifestyle advice about good diets and decent activity levels. & # 39;

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The findings are published in the British Medical Journal, Heart,

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