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Table service, 50 patrons and NO mixing: everything you need to know about your pub night out

New South Wales will welcome up to 50 customers in pubs on June 1 after relaxing more coronavirus restrictions.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian, who announced the ‘big and critical’ move on Friday, hopes the changes will enable thousands of Australians to return to work safely during the health crisis.

But the new freedom comes with greater responsibility for tax collectors and cheerleaders to ensure that there are no COVID-19 outbreaks.

Ms Berejiklian said that pubs – as well as cafes, restaurants and clubs – will be subject to strict rules.

“This decision was made with expert health advice and both companies and customers will be subject to strict rules and guidelines,” she said.

New South Wales will welcome up to 50 guests in pubs on June 1. Pictured: A bartender pours a customer a bottle of beer to take to the Hero of Waterloo pub in The Rocks, Sydney, on May 15

New South Wales welcomes 1 to 50 customers in pubs on June. Pictured: A bartender pours a customer a bottle of beer to take to the Hero of Waterloo pub in The Rocks, Sydney, on May 15

All customers are expected to remain seated and avoid mixing. Pictured: Customers dining at the Rio, in Summer Hill, Sydney, on Friday, May 15

All customers are expected to remain seated and avoid mixing. Pictured: Customers dining at the Rio, in Summer Hill, Sydney, on Friday, May 15

All customers are expected to remain seated and avoid mixing. Pictured: Customers dining at the Rio, in Summer Hill, Sydney, on Friday, May 15

NO MIX

The days of ordering a beer at the bar and hanging out for a catch up are probably a thing of the past.

All customers are expected to remain seated and avoid mixing to ensure compliance with social distance guidelines.

“No one will be able to stand in these locations,” said Ms Berejiklian.

“You have to sit at a table, even if it’s a pub. You must be seated at the table, you must be served at the table.

“There is no mixing, no standing. There are strict guidelines that ensure that we can do this safely. ‘

For the relaxed restrictions, a rule of one person per four square meters applies. Pictured: A man drinks his beer in the interior of Sydney after NSW first moved to ease restrictions

For the relaxed restrictions, a rule of one person per four square meters applies. Pictured: A man drinks his beer in the interior of Sydney after NSW first moved to ease restrictions

For the relaxed restrictions, a rule of one person per four square meters applies. Pictured: A man drinks his beer in the interior of Sydney after NSW first moved to ease restrictions

FOUR SQUARE METERS PER PERSON

The relaxed restrictions are subject to a rule of one person per four square meters, meaning smaller pubs are not allowed to host the 50 partygoers.

“It must be in accordance with the four square meter rule,” the Prime Minister explained.

“So some locations are small in space … According to the four square meter rule, they will only be able to have as many customers as is allowed in that space.”

Ms Berejiklian said that the reservations should not exceed 10 people per group. Customers are seen at The Rio in inner-west Sydney

Ms Berejiklian said that the reservations should not exceed 10 people per group. Customers are seen at The Rio in inner-west Sydney

Ms Berejiklian said that the reservations should not exceed 10 people per group. Customers are seen at The Rio in inner-west Sydney

NO BOOKINGS OF MORE THAN 10

Ms Berejiklian said that the reservations should not exceed 10 people per group.

The limit on social gatherings of 10 people remains consistent both in the pub and outdoors, NSW health minister Brad Hazzard said.

“Only ten people can be outside at the moment.

“You no longer have the limitation that you are not allowed to leave your house … but you do have a very strong limitation that is not groups larger than 10.

“That applies inside and out.

“So if you go to a cafe or restaurant, you should definitely not expect a large group. It will be in selected groups. ‘

Current restrictions in NSW allow groups of 10 to gather outside, while five people can visit a home.

NSW is looking for a 'register' for restaurants and pubs to track COVID-19 outbreaks. Customers are expected to share their name and phone number (stock image)

NSW is looking for a 'register' for restaurants and pubs to track COVID-19 outbreaks. Customers are expected to share their name and phone number (stock image)

NSW is looking for a ‘register’ for restaurants and pubs to track COVID-19 outbreaks. Customers are expected to share their name and phone number (stock image)

REGISTER

Mr. Hazzard said that NSW “did so well” to keep the COVID-19 crisis under control because of their tracking capabilities.

He said they plan to extend contact tracking in pubs and restaurants through a customer registry.

Customers are expected to share their name and phone number.

“Each of us is actually a soldier in a war against this virus,” said Hazzard.

“And each of us must be willing to live our lives in a slightly different way when we get our old lives back.

“In this case, however, it’s more likely – and we’re working with the industry here – that every person goes in [to a venue] would also give their name and phone number.

“That would certainly help protect us all.”

The idea is similar to the federal government’s COVIDSafe app, which uses Bluetooth data to inform Australians if they have come close to a confirmed coronavirus case.

Pictured: A group of friends dine at Yama Gardens in Darlinghurst, Sydney on May 15

Pictured: A group of friends dine at Yama Gardens in Darlinghurst, Sydney on May 15

Pictured: A group of friends dine at Yama Gardens in Darlinghurst, Sydney on May 15

NO SHARED CUTLERY OR BUFFETS

Ms Berejiklian reiterated that in locations it will be ‘very different’ if NSW tries to slowly return to normal life.

She said that buffets would no longer exist and the use of cutlery would be changed.

“Imagine that even something as simple as common cutlery on a table can no longer exist,” she said.

Pubs are expected to remove water and cutlery stations.

NSW first began reducing their coronavirus restrictions on Friday, May 15 after the federal government's green light

NSW first began reducing their coronavirus restrictions on Friday, May 15 after the federal government's green light

NSW first began reducing their coronavirus restrictions on Friday, May 15 after the federal government’s green light

HAND HYGIENE

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 7,083

New South Wales: 3,084

Victoria: 1,581

Queensland: 1,058

Western Australia: 557

South Australia: 439

Tasmania: 228

Australian Capital Territory: 107

Northern Territory: 29

TOTAL CASES: 7,083

RESTORED: 6,472

KILL: 101

While relaxed restrictions are a positive step for the state, the same social distance rules and hand hygiene guidelines apply.

Residents of NSW are encouraged to return to the pub with their friends, as long as they continue to act wisely.

“When you arrive at the restaurant, you must first use a hand sanitizer or wash your hands,” said Mr. Hazzard.

‘Then sit down, enjoy your dinner, do what NSW residents have always done, have a great night out with your friends, but be careful, be careful, and this works to the benefit of the whole community, but also keeps you safe . ‘

Pubs were shut down across Australia from March 23 in a desperate attempt to control the coronavirus outbreak.

NSW first began reducing their coronavirus restrictions on Friday, May 15, following the green light from the federal government.

A maximum of 10 customers were allowed to visit pubs, restaurants and cafes.

NSW reported her 50th COVID-19 death earlier on Friday after an 80-year-old woman died at Concord Hospital. Her death brings the national toll to 101.

There were three new cases of coronavirus from more than 8,600 tests.

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