For Cassandra Bennett, her husband Daniel and their children James, 5, and Julian, 3, it took less than a week for their world to be turned upside down by brain cancer

For Cassandra Bennett, it took less than a week for her whole world to be turned upside down by brain cancer.

In the space of these few days, what the 38-year-old man had shrugged off as a headache and an attack of pneumonia became a hard struggle for life.

The change in diagnosis was made possible by an eagle-eyed doctor who suspected that apparently explainable symptoms were the cause of something serious.

After a referral from her family doctor, Cassandra, mother of two children from Sydney, found herself in the hospital on a cold July morning, waiting for a series of tests to decide her fate.

For Cassandra Bennett, her husband Daniel and their children James, 5, and Julian, 3, it took less than a week for their world to be turned upside down by brain cancer

For Cassandra Bennett, her husband Daniel and their children James, 5, and Julian, 3, it took less than a week for their world to be turned upside down by brain cancer

"They came to me after the first CT scan and just said 'it's not a headache,' he told FEMAIL about the day's tests.

After being recommended to undergo an MRI, Cassandra found herself in the machine in only 20 minutes.

Although he wanted to reschedule her, the doctors begged him to stay in the hospital with the hope that the cause of his symptoms would be discovered.

"At this point, I still thought I had sinusitis and just wanted to go back to work, but in retrospect, the urgency of the doctors should have been a trigger," he said.

"Once I finally got to the GP, she sat me down and I just said" this is a big blow and I'm not complaining about anything, right? "

But instead, his doctor responded "it's just the opposite, it's a brain tumor."

Although she wanted to reschedule the tests, the doctors begged her to stay in the hospital with the hope that the cause of her symptoms would be discovered.

Although she wanted to reschedule the tests, the doctors begged her to stay in the hospital with the hope that the cause of her symptoms would be discovered.

Although she wanted to reschedule the tests, the doctors begged her to stay in the hospital with the hope that the cause of her symptoms would be discovered.

Cassandra's final diagnosis was a diffuse astrocytoma, a stage two brain tumor with a survival rate that ranges from eight to ten years.

Cassandra's final diagnosis was a diffuse astrocytoma, a stage two brain tumor with a survival rate that ranges from eight to ten years.

Cassandra's final diagnosis was a diffuse astrocytoma, a stage two brain tumor with a survival rate that ranges from eight to ten years.

The final diagnosis was a diffuse astrocytoma, a stage two brain tumor with a survival rate ranging from eight to ten years.

Despite its status as one of the most serious brain tumors, funding for treatment research has been insufficient, since THE's survival rate is only 1% higher than 30 years ago.

He is also the biggest cancer killer in children and a person is diagnosed every five hours.

In an attempt to raise awareness and get financial support, Cassandra and her family, including her husband Daniel and their children James, 5, and Julian, 3, participate in the Walk4BrainCancer on October 21.

Despite being confronted by an unimaginable and perhaps insurmountable obstacle in her diagnosis, Cassandra has found hope and purpose in the midst of chaos.

"At some point you have to get involved with the point that it's not good news, but there's also something else inside of you that puts things in perspective," he said.

And even though she faced an unimaginable obstacle, Cassandra has continually found hope in the midst of chaos.

And even though she faced an unimaginable obstacle, Cassandra has continually found hope in the midst of chaos.

And even though she faced an unimaginable obstacle, Cassandra has continually found hope in the midst of chaos.

"I have been in a great hospital, I have had excellent doctors and surgeons and I have had an incredible experience with my family, and now I am seeing more of my children than I have seen in a long time."

"I know that everything sounds very, very bad and I know it's going to be, but today, at this moment, it's quite encouraging."

On the other hand, he also feels some frustration at the slow progress in the search for cures or at least the prolonged longevity for those diagnosed with the disease.

"We all have the funding, especially because the drugs spend a lot of time from the test phase to the market," he said.

"Brain cancer is something where there is a bit of hope and while today's money goes to drugs that are still in the testing phase, they offer real opportunities for the future."

the Walk4BrainCancer The series will be held throughout the country during the coming months and donations can be made to the Cassandra website. here.

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