WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Sydney residents rushed to hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning after gas heater leak

‘Silent killer’ puts three people in Sydney hospital because they are found ‘extremely unwell’

  • Three Sydney residents rushed to hospital after gas leak
  • Fire and rescue teams found the trio at a house in Rosehill on Sunday night
  • They suffered from carbon monoxide poisoning from a faulty heater

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

Three people have been hospitalized with carbon monoxide poisoning after a gas leak in a home triggered an urgent warning for people to check their stoves.

Fire and rescue teams were called to a Rosehill house in western Sydney just before 10:30 p.m. Sunday night over reports of a gas leak.

The crews, who came from Parramatta and Silverwater fire stations, were all wearing respirators when they entered the house and discovered a man and a woman in their 70s and a man in their 50s who were seriously ill.

Three Sydney residents were taken to hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning on Sunday night after a gas leak at a house in Rosehill (pictured, one of the residents is put on a stretcher by two paramedics)

Three Sydney residents were taken to hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning on Sunday night after a gas leak at a house in Rosehill (pictured, one of the residents is put on a stretcher by two paramedics)

One resident was unconscious and the other two barely conscious.

The trio, who suffered from carbon monoxide poisoning, were carried outside by firefighters.

Before an ambulance arrived and transported the residents to the hospital, emergency care was provided.

New South Wales Fire and Rescue believes they were ambushed by CO gas from a faulty indoor heater.

Fire and Rescue has urged people to check their stoves for leaks, as carbon monoxide poisoning can be deadly.

NSW Fire and Rescue believes the trio were overwhelmed by carbon monoxide gas from a malfunctioning indoor heater (pictured, a gas detector used by firefighters in the house)

NSW Fire and Rescue believes the trio were overwhelmed by carbon monoxide gas from a malfunctioning indoor heater (pictured, a gas detector used by firefighters in the house)

NSW Fire and Rescue believes the trio were overwhelmed by carbon monoxide gas from a malfunctioning indoor heater (pictured, a gas detector used by firefighters in the house)

“FRNSW encourages the public to ensure that heating appliances are serviced regularly,” they said in a statement.

“Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas that can render a person unconscious and be fatal if accumulated in a confined space.”

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More