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Megan Hasick lives at home with her parents in Sydney and reduces unnecessary expenses to start saving to buy a house

Personal trainer, 24, saving $ 6,000 a month by working four different jobs and living at home, reveals her top tips to make her stretch

  • Megan Hasick lives at home with her parents and saves $ 6,000 every month
  • She works four jobs and puts all the surplus money after bills into her savings
  • She suggests that people prepare meals and check out the bargains of gasoline and groceries
  • New research suggests that millennials are increasingly worried about their savings
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A nutritionist and personal trainer has revealed how she manages to save $ 6,000 a month.

Megan Hasick lives at home with her parents in Sydney and reduces unnecessary expenses to start saving to buy a house.

She works four jobs as a dietitian, nutritionist and personal trainer and rarely fails between appointments.

The 24-year-old told Daily Mail Australia that she hopes to have enough money to buy her first home within the next 12 months.

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Mrs. Hasick said that all her money after bills and supplies goes into savings.

Megan Hasick lives at home with her parents in Sydney and reduces unnecessary expenses to start saving to buy a house

Megan Hasick lives at home with her parents in Sydney and reduces unnecessary expenses to start saving to buy a house

& # 39; I work four jobs, so until I get something permanent, I will initially look at buying a house that is an investment that I can eventually live in, "she said.

Mrs. Hasick said that many people do not realize that & # 39; a little goes a long way every week & # 39; and that the most difficult part often starts easily.

& # 39; I prepare meals, so I rarely buy meals except on social occasions, & # 39; she said.

She also said it pays to be wise with sales and the right moment & # 39; to make necessary purchases.

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Petrol prices, for example, often fluctuate during the week.

Mrs. Hasick checks prices and uses the 7/11 app to let her know when and where prices have fallen to fill her tank.

The 24-year-old told Daily Mail Australia that she hopes to have enough money to buy her first home within the next 12 months

The 24-year-old told Daily Mail Australia that she hopes to have enough money to buy her first home within the next 12 months

The 24-year-old told Daily Mail Australia that she hopes to have enough money to buy her first home within the next 12 months

The 4c ​​discount coupons per liter are also great value for money, she said.

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When she does her shopping every week, she will go through the specials again and stock up on products that she knows she always uses when they are on sale.

For her, peanut butter and yogurt items that she can usually get with a discount. But the secret of specials is that they do not dictate your spending habits and lead to unnecessary spending.

Australians are increasingly dumping their morning coffee and private health care in an effort to increase their savings.

A MILLENNIAL'S TIPS FOR SAVING MONEY

1. Cut the coffee

2. Pay attention to cheap offers for groceries and gasoline

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3. Meal preparation for breakfast and lunch in the middle of the week

4. Find a suitable savings account with a high interest rate

New research conducted by UBank suggests that more than half of the young adult population are making sacrifices to inject themselves into the real estate market.

The survey shows that 61 percent of Australians between the ages of 18 and 24 eat out, while 41 percent say they have reduced their morning coffee, gym membership, and streaming services.

But as more Australians become aware of their spending habits, the fear of finances also increases.

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More than 75 percent of Australians suffer from fear if they ever have to dive into their savings account, the study found.

Millennials are also the most likely of any age group who are concerned about the amount of savings they have for their age, with an overwhelming number of young Australians who feel they don't have enough savings.

Another saving method that has recently gained momentum is the & # 39; $ 1,000 project & # 39; where millennials are encouraged to split their larger saving goals into achievable & # 39; bite-sized pieces & # 39 ;.

Australian financial expert Canna Campbell managed to save $ 68,000 outside of her salary within two and a half years by following this pattern.

One of Ms. Campbell's main motivations behind her & # 39; $ 1,000 project & # 39; was to inform people about the idea of ​​a & # 39; passive income & # 39 ;.

& # 39; It's money you earn while you & # 39; sleep at night – it's your money that works for you instead of working for money. That is the true and authentic definition of being financially independent and free, & she said.

& # 39; In less than two and a half years I have saved, earned and manifested $ 68,000 and invested in a diversified equity portfolio with a passive income of more than $ 3,600 a year.

& # 39; Not a single dollar came out of my savings or my salary. I really wanted to break people's opinions and the thought: "I only earn X dollars a year that I could never pay or save." & # 39;

What is the $ 1,000 project?

Canna shows people how easy it is to increase their savings by manifesting and creating money in her daily life where she does not go without pleasure or luxury.

Every time she saves money, earns money, or finds money in her life, she puts it in a separate savings account, and when there is $ 1,000, she invests it by buying long-term passive sources of income that match her long term financial targets for income and capital growth.

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As revenues increase, she constantly adds to the portfolio with more than $ 1,000 packages and reinvests revenues to build growth opportunities. Her goal for the challenge is that the stock portfolio can pay for things she wants – whether it's vacations or material things.

For people who are not willing to invest, they can use their $ 1,000 packages to pay off debts or even to build up savings.

& # 39; Buying shares is definitely not for everyone, so I do not recommend this before I seek professional financial advice. But for me and my financial goals, I understand the risks and make informed decisions that fit me perfectly, & said Canna.

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