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Sydney is covered in fog and Australia continues for a wet six months as wild weather continues

Winter Outage: Fog bomb causes road chaos, as forecasters warn Australia will endure above average rainfall for six weeks

  • Friday morning, Sydney was overcast in thick fog with many landmarks hidden
  • Australia faces a wet six months after an increased chance of a La Nina
  • La Nina event is above average rainfall that can cause cyclones and floods
  • Bureau of Meteorology has announced that the chance of a La Nina is 50 percent

On the east coast of Australia, a thick layer of fog has settled as the rest of the country prepares for six months of possible drought-induced rainfall.

The Bureau of Meteorology has announced that the chances of a La Nina event, which is an above-average chance of months of rainfall, are currently 50 percent.

The La Nina will also bring cooler daytime temperatures for Australians and a high risk of tropical cyclones and floods.

Sydneysiders woke up on Friday morning with an ominous sight, as much of the city was covered in fog.

Sydney's Crown Casino (pictured on Friday morning) was nearly invisible after being covered in thick fog

Sydney’s Crown Casino (pictured on Friday morning) was nearly invisible after being covered in thick fog

A ferry (pictured) can be taken just bottom left as it sails out of Sydney Harbor, covered in fog Friday morning

A ferry (pictured) can be taken just bottom left as it sails out of Sydney Harbor, covered in fog Friday morning

A ferry (pictured) can be taken just bottom left as it sails out of Sydney Harbor, covered in fog Friday morning

Only the top of the Crown Casino and the Center Point Tower could be seen as chaos for commuters on their way to work with poor road visibility.

The fog comes after it was announced that Australia would face a wet winter and that rain continues into spring.

“The agency’s ENSO outlook awaits at La Nina, indicating that La Nina is likely to form in 2020 at about 50 percent – about double the average probability,” said the bill of materials.

“Although the cooling trend has declined compared to two weeks ago, more than half of the international climate models surveyed expect this cooling to reach or exceed the threshold for La Nina in the spring.”

A La Nina takes place every three to seven years and Australia was hit with the biggest rain shower ever recorded during the 2010-2012 La Nina.

Australia is likely to see a La Nina event, meaning there will be above-average rainfall across the country (pictured, rain in Sydney's CBD on May 9)

Australia is likely to see a La Nina event, meaning there will be above-average rainfall across the country (pictured, rain in Sydney's CBD on May 9)

Australia is likely to see a La Nina event, meaning there will be above-average rainfall across the country (pictured, rain in Sydney’s CBD on May 9)

Australia will already see a wet weekend in parts of South Australia, NSW, Victoria and South East Queensland (photo)

Australia will already see a wet weekend in parts of South Australia, NSW, Victoria and South East Queensland (photo)

Australia will already see a wet weekend in parts of South Australia, NSW, Victoria and South East Queensland (photo)

During this time, Australia was plagued by extreme flooding and recorded some of the wettest years ever.

The Murray-Darling Basin had its wettest year ever in 2010 and Western Australia had the heaviest rainfall in 2011.

The eastern states of Australia will already see some heavy rainfall over the weekend.

A strong low-pressure system will cause storms, strong winds and possible floods in the coming days.

The Bureau of Meteorology has announced that the chances of a La Nina event, which is an above-average chance of rainfall, are currently 50 percent.  Pictured flooded streets in Byron Bay in February

The Bureau of Meteorology has announced that the chances of a La Nina event, which is an above-average chance of rainfall, are currently 50 percent.  Pictured flooded streets in Byron Bay in February

The Bureau of Meteorology has announced that the chances of a La Nina event, which is an above-average chance of rainfall, are currently 50 percent. Pictured flooded streets in Byron Bay in February

The system is entering from southwestern Western Australia to the southeast of the country, with rain expected in Victoria, NSW and parts of Southeast Queensland.

Forecasters have warned that the system is expected to move off the coast of NSW and intensify into a low-pressure east coast system that could damage the Southeast with damaging winds and torrential rains.

Melbourne, Adelaide, Canberra and Sydney are in for a wet weekend with rain showers expected on both days.

WHAT IS LA NINA?

La Niña occurs when the equatorial trade winds get stronger, the currents in the ocean surface change, and cooler deep water pulls up from below.

This results in a cooling of the central and eastern tropical Pacific.

The improved trade winds also help build warm surface waters in the western Pacific and northern Australia.

The warming of the ocean temperatures in the Western Pacific makes the area more favorable for rising air, cloud development and rainfall.

As a result, heavy rainfall can occur in northern Australia.

Source: BOM

Brisbane has some clouds on Saturday before the showers start on Sunday.

Darwin will remain dry and warm for the next few days with highs in the 1930s and lows in the 1920s.

Perth will enjoy a sunny weekend with a high of 20C on Saturday and 23C on Sunday.

Hobart has cloudy skies and cool weather, with chilly morning temperatures at 2C on Saturdays and Sundays.

In a recent study, co-authored by Andrew King, a climatologist from the University of Melbourne, an event at La Nina was found to be a driving force in breaking through droughts.

Drought-breaking rainfall is significantly more common during a La Nina season than an El Nino or ENSO neutral season, the study said.

“ Without a La Nina or a negative IOD event, it is difficult for wet conditions to perform on a large spatial scale during a season in the Murray Darling Basin or much of Eastern Australia.

“The major Australian drought of the past 100 years coincided with some of the longer periods when La Nina and negative IOD events did not occur.”

FOUR DAYS AGAIN IN YOUR CITY

SYDNEY:

FRIDAY: Min 10. Max 19. Partly cloudy

SATURDAY: Min 10. Max 20. Possible shower.

SUNDAY: Min 9. Max 18. Shower or two.

MONDAY: Min 10. Max 18. Showers.

BRISBANE:

FRIDAY: Min 13. Max 22. Shower or two.

SATURDAY: Min 13. Max 23. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 13. Max 23. Showers increase.

MONDAY: Min 14. Max 19. Shower or two.

ADELAIDE:

FRIDAY: Min 8. Max 15: Showers are increasing.

SATURDAY: Min 7. Max 13. Showers.

SUNDAY: Min 6. Max 15. Possible shower.

MONDAY: Min 6. Max 15. Mostly sunny

PERTH:

FRIDAY: Min 5. Max 18. Mostly sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 4. Max 20. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 7. Max 23. Sunny day. Late shower or two.

MONDAY: Min. 12. Max. 21. Showers are increasing.

MELBOURNE:

FRIDAY: Min 8. Max 16. Mostly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 9. Max 15. Showers. Possible storm.

SUNDAY: Min 7. Max 14. One or two showers.

MONDAY: Min 7. Max 15. Cloudy.

CANBERRA:

FRIDAY: Min 1. Max 14. Possible shower.

SATURDAY: Min 3. Max 14. Showers.

SUNDAY: Min 3. Max 13. Possible shower.

MONDAY: Min 4. Max 13. Shower or two

DARWIN:

FRIDAY: Min 21. Max 33. Sunny

SATURDAY: Min 22. Max 33. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 23. Max 33. Sunny

MONDAY: Min 22. Max 33. Sunny

HOBART:

FRIDAY: Min 4. Max 10. Partly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 2. Max 10. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 2. Max 13. Partly cloudy

MONDAY: Min 3. Max 11. Partly cloudy

SOURCE: Bureau of Meteorology

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