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Sydney father Jason Miller who lost limbs to sepsis can be forced to live in a nursing home

A father who lost his hands and feet to sepsis claims that he was told that he is not handicapped enough to qualify for special accommodation.

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Jason Miller, 49 – known to his family and friends as Buddy – almost died after developing a serious infection in the Philippines last year.

The former ferry operator of Manly survived but had to have his limbs amputated to stop the spread of the infection.

After 12 months of rehab, Mr Miller is ready to move from Mona Vale Hospital in Sydney to his own place with his eight-year-old daughter Jhayda, whom he shared custody.

However, he claims a health report that exaggerates his abilities – thereby excluding him from the right accommodation – has prevented him from continuing his life & # 39 ;.

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Jason Miller wants to leave rehabilitation with his eight year old daughter Jhayda (both in the photo) and move into a house

Miller (photo) almost died after developing a serious infection in the Philippines last year

Miller (photo) almost died after developing a serious infection in the Philippines last year

Miller (photo) almost died after developing a serious infection in the Philippines last year

& # 39; (The report) makes me look like I could go jogging, & # 39; he said Nine news.

& # 39; I shuffle and I can roll, but that's not much. I can't just put on my legs … They shrink a little (during the day) and I need help to put on more socks. Fortunately I have friends who can help. & # 39;

His report is currently being reassessed, which means that he can afford a suitable two-bedroom apartment in Mona Vale to live with his daughter Jhayda.

He faces another obstacle because there are limited places available, he claims.

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He told me Daily telegram the Mona Vale unit was the only specialized accommodation on the peninsula that is currently available.

& # 39; Spiritually I have been strong in everything that has happened in the last 12 months, but this has cracked me, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Some days I'm just not myself. I don't want to talk to anyone.

& # 39; At the moment I am moving to a nursing home until something else is available. & # 39;

& # 39; We have been told several times that he has less than 10 percent chance of survival & # 39 ;, said Kate Munn - Jason's sister-in-law. & # 39; Not just once or twice. We were often told that he might not make it in the coming hours. & # 39;

& # 39; We have been told several times that he has less than 10 percent chance of survival & # 39 ;, said Kate Munn - Jason's sister-in-law. & # 39; Not just once or twice. We were often told that he might not make it in the coming hours. & # 39;

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& # 39; We have been told several times that he has less than 10 percent chance of survival & # 39 ;, Kate Munn – Jason's sister-in-law – told Daily Mail Australia. & # 39; Not just once or twice. We were often told that he might not make it in the coming hours. & # 39;

& # 39; A true miracle & # 39 ;: Buddy & # 39; s fighting spirit came out in full force and to the surprise of doctors, nurses and his family, he woke up five days later

& # 39; A true miracle & # 39 ;: Buddy & # 39; s fighting spirit came out in full force and to the surprise of doctors, nurses and his family, he woke up five days later

& # 39; A true miracle & # 39 ;: Buddy & # 39; s fighting spirit came out in full force and to the surprise of doctors, nurses and his family, he woke up five days later

Jason Miller (photo), 49 - known to his family and friends as Buddy - was admitted to the hospital and within an hour he fought for his life in October last year

Jason Miller (photo), 49 - known to his family and friends as Buddy - was admitted to the hospital and within an hour he fought for his life in October last year

Jason Miller (photo), 49 – known to his family and friends as Buddy – was admitted to the hospital and within an hour he fought for his life in October last year

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Miller flew back to Sydney last October, when his health was getting worse.

He initially thought it was the flu, but when he was finally hospitalized, he was put in a coma, diagnosed with a bacterial infection of both streptococcus and aerococcus that caused toxic shock syndrome and severe septic shock.

On the advice of doctors that his heart would soon give out, the family also called in a priest to give him his last rites.

Miller (photo) had amputated both hands and both feet in an attempt to stop the spread of the infection

Miller (photo) had amputated both hands and both feet in an attempt to stop the spread of the infection

Miller (photo) had amputated both hands and both feet in an attempt to stop the spread of the infection

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

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Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition that is caused by the body's response to an infection. The body normally releases chemicals into the bloodstream to fight infection.

It occurs when the body's response to these chemicals is out of balance, causing changes that can damage multiple organ systems.

Symptoms include fever, respiratory problems, low blood pressure, rapid heartbeat, and mental confusion.

But Mr. Miller's fighting spirit came at full strength and to the surprise of doctors, nurses and his family, he woke up five days later.

His positive attitude has been called inspiring by health professionals.

He said he feels happy, just live.

& # 39; Sepsis attacked my body, adrenaline and sepsis shrunk my veins and my limbs all went black and I lost my hands and I lost my feet, but I got my life back so that was good, & # 39; he said Seven news.

Despite Mr Miller's claims, an NDIS spokesperson said he has been approved for specialist accommodation.

& # 39; The NDIA will continue to work with Mr. Miller to ensure that he is able to access appropriate accommodation and other disability-related support that he needs, & # 39; said the spokesman.

Miller has an enormous network of family and friends who supported him during the trial. Pictured is a family reunion in Baradine, NSW in October 2017

Miller has an enormous network of family and friends who supported him during the trial. Pictured is a family reunion in Baradine, NSW in October 2017

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Miller has an enormous network of family and friends who supported him during the trial. Pictured is a family reunion in Baradine, NSW in October 2017

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