Sydney buyers form a long line outside Sydney Chemist Warehouse to buy products and resell them to China

You could see dozens of shoppers queuing up in front of a Chemist Warehouse in downtown Sydney in a photo uploaded yesterday at Reddit, many of which are there to buy vitamins and baby formula in hopes of reselling them to China with a benefit

Dozens of buyers line up in front of a chemical store to stock up on baby formula and vitamins to resell in China.

  • A long queue of shoppers lined up in front of a Chemist Warehouse in Sydney
  • Social media users said they were hoping to buy health products
  • One commenter said they were buying the product to resell it in China with a profit
  • The scene now is a regular occurrence with the number of scalpers on the rise

Dozens of shoppers line up outside a Chemist Warehouse in downtown Sydney to stock up on health products and resell them in China.

The queue to enter the store of the pharmacy chain on George Street, in the central business district, goes around the block.

The line of people anxiously waiting for baby formula, vitamins and moisturizer were more interested in making money than in being aware of their health, according to users of social networks.

You could see dozens of shoppers queuing up in front of a Chemist Warehouse in downtown Sydney in a photo uploaded yesterday at Reddit, many of which are there to buy vitamins and baby formula in hopes of reselling them to China with a benefit

You could see dozens of shoppers queuing up in front of a Chemist Warehouse in downtown Sydney in a photo uploaded yesterday at Reddit, many of which are there to buy vitamins and baby formula in hopes of reselling them to China with a benefit

The photo was posted on the r / sydney Reddit forum, and attracted a variety of explanations as to why there was such a long line.

One user said: "These people are mainly students in that queue, and that's how they earn money to live.

"Products made in Australia and products of Australian origin are reaching high prices in China, since products produced in the country can not be trusted.

Pay well ($ 30,000 – $ 300,000 p / a) depending on the amount of work you invest & # 39;

Another user claimed that they saw customers' literally climb on top of each other & # 39; at the George Street branch this week.

The branch staff said there was a sale on certain products on Monday, which led to the introduction of a queue system that night.

Australian-made health products reach high prices in China as brands are considered to be of better quality than Chinese equivalents.

Chinese consumers consider that Australian products, such as baby formula, are of higher quality than their own versions

Chinese consumers consider that Australian products, such as baby formula, are of higher quality than their own versions

Chinese consumers consider that Australian products, such as baby formula, are of higher quality than their own versions

The Chinese citizens of Sydney buy products from Australian chemists and then send them home or advertise them on social networks like WeChat, which makes them a considerable gain.

They are known as & # 39; daigou & # 39 ;, which translates as & # 39; buy on behalf of & # 39 ;.

In 2017, the digital marketer Benjamin Sun of Think China estimated that there were around 80,000 & # 39; daigou & # 39; exercising his office in Australia, compared to 40,000 in 2014.

The resale craze of the baby formula

The demand for baby formula from Chinese consumers in particular has led Aptamil manufacturers to increase their production by 50 percent in just three months.

An Australian post office was recently opened in the suburb of Chatswood, Sydney, 20% of whose population is Chinese since birth, with a sign on the door announcing "direct mail to China" and shelves lined with baby formula .

Many major supermarkets have established a limit per customer, such as Coles and Woolworths, which have applied a limit of four items to brands such as Aptamil Gold-plus.

According to reports, Asian buyers simply make the payment and buy back more.

Source: news.com.au

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