Sussex’s County Championship opener against Lancashire in doubt due to contamination with DADDY LONGLEGS

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Encroachment on DADDY LONGLEGS puts Sussex’s County Championship opener against Lancashire in question after the swarm damaged the Hove outfield … and game could now go to Old Trafford

  • Sussex’s County Championship opener against Lancashire in Hove was able to move up
  • A daddy longleg plague has damaged the cricket pitch outfield
  • Officials will make a decision on whether or not to move the game to Old Trafford

A daddy longlegs contamination has jeopardized Sussex’s County Championship opening match against Lancashire and a decision on whether or not to move the match to Emirates Old Trafford will be made on Friday.

An inspection of the damaged Hove outfield – caused by long-winged fly larvae feeding on the grassroots – will take place Friday morning, with Lancashire willing to switch locations for their two championship games if necessary.

In addition to the April 8 game, the clubs are also scheduled to meet in Manchester from April 29 to May 2 as part of a 10-game conference phase until this summer’s championship.

Sussex's County Championship opener against Lancashire could be moved after a daddy with his long legs damaged the outfield near Hove (photo in October)

Sussex’s County Championship opener against Lancashire could be moved after a daddy with his long legs damaged the outfield near Hove (photo in October)

Friday morning, an inspection of the damaged outer field of Hove - caused by long-winged larvae feeding on the grass roots, will take place.

Friday morning, an inspection of the damaged outer field of Hove - caused by long-winged larvae feeding on the grass roots, will take place.

Friday morning, an inspection of the damaged outer field of Hove – caused by long-winged larvae feeding on the grass roots, will take place.

Former Sussex groundsman Andy Mackay, the ECB’s pitch and grounds advisor, will meet with his successor Ben Gibson to investigate the bare spots on the seaward side of the ground.

“We have to make a decision now as everyone needs time to adapt to any change, not least Lancashire preparing a pitch,” a Sussex spokesperson confirmed.

Sussex is struggling to tackle the bug problem effectively as the insecticide commonly used in such situations has been banned in the UK since 2016.

Unlike the Ashes of 1972, when the Australians were left smoking after a grass-killing fungus called fusarium left the Headingley field bare and Derek Underwood helped spin England to a three-day victory, the Sussex problem doesn’t affect the square .

Officials will make a decision on whether or not to move the match to Emirates Old Trafford

Officials will make a decision on whether or not to move the match to Emirates Old Trafford

Officials will make a decision on whether or not to move the match to Emirates Old Trafford

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