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Susannah Birch was 15 when she & # 39; Richard & # 39; met online and the couple spoke online for over ten years - but never met in person

The woman describes how she was perfumed for 12 years by a 60-year-old grandfather who sent her photos of his own SON while posing as a 17-year-old boy

  • Susannah Birch was 15 when she & # 39; Richard & # 39; met online and the couple spoke online
  • Mrs. Birch and Richard spoke for 12 years and sent photos to each other
  • At the age of 18 he introduced her but promptly ended the relationship weeks later
  • After watching MTV & # 39; s Catfish, she became suspicious of Richard & # 39; s identity
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A woman initialed by a grandfather in the 1960s and 60s revealed how he presented himself as a 17-year-old boy.

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Susannah Birch was 15 when she & # 39; Richard & # 39; met online and the couple spoke online for over ten years – but never met in person.

The man told her that he was a 17-year-old from Mackay and that the couple had an online relationship within a few weeks.

Susannah Birch was 15 when she & # 39; Richard & # 39; met online and the couple spoke online for over ten years - but never met in person

Susannah Birch was 15 when she & # 39; Richard & # 39; met online and the couple spoke online for over ten years – but never met in person

& # 39; At one point, when my father was out of town, we spoke by phone for 24 hours. The relationship involved sexually explicit things, & # 39; she said news.com.au.

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Mrs. Birch wondered why the couple couldn't meet, but Richard & # 39; s answers were reasonable – and she wasn't worried about being a scammer because he never asked for money and invested a lot of time in the relationship.

After three years, when Mrs. Birch was 18, Richard suggested and she was excited that the couple would finally meet.

Two weeks later, he broke up.

& # 39; That was the straw for me – I decided that our romantic relationship was over. However, we kept talking and he would moan for the next nine years that I was the one who escaped, & she said.

The time passed, Mrs. Birch married and had children, and she and Richard kept talking and e-mailing.

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She said he was going to send photos and they all seemed to age quite well over time – but when she saw the catfish catfish, she became suspicious.

Mrs. Birch used a professional service that discovered that in the 1960s Richard was in fact a grandfather who had falsified his name and identity – and also used his son's photos to mislead Mrs. Birch.

The man told her that he was a 17-year-old from Mackay and had an online relationship within a few weeks

The man told her that he was a 17-year-old from Mackay and had an online relationship within a few weeks

The man told her that he was a 17-year-old from Mackay and had an online relationship within a few weeks

She said it was a liberating experience to find out who her cat fisherman was.

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She said that catfish does not fit with a certain idea of ​​a predator or scammer and can be in it for various reasons, such as revenge, loneliness or porn.

Mrs. Birch said that a catfish can be found everywhere – including pregnancy groups or dating apps.

She said it is so easy nowadays to build a fake online persona on the internet.

Susan De Campo, a relationship advisor, said people with catfish & nasty & # 39; nasty & # 39; have motives, such as getting something, such as money, or having fun in & # 39; the game & # 39 ;.

She said it's easy to wonder how people get catfished, but emotional necessity is a strong hold.

WHAT ARE SOME RED FLAGS WHEN IT COMES TO ONLINE DATING?

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Holly Barrter, who runs Matchsmith.com.au, revealed her red flags when it comes to online dating.

Red flags:

  • Someone with few pictures
  • Dated or stock images
  • Canceled meetings
  • Chat with someone for a longer period and no suggestion for an appointment

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