Surviving two Dionne Quintuplets celebrate their 87th birthday

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The two surviving Dionne Quintuplets, who were taken from their mothers as babies to be placed in a tourist attraction called Quintland, have celebrated their 87th birthday.

Annette and Cecile were born in 1934 together with three sisters Yvonne, Emilie and Marie. Their mother was just 25 at the time.

Not long after their birth, the girls were snatched from their parents and placed under the care of doctors and nurses in Ontario, Canada.

They were returned to their biological parents when they were nine and subjected to years of sexual abuse by their father and torment from his five other children.

In 1998, Cecile and her sisters Annette and Yvonne received a settlement from the Ontario government as compensation for their circus-like upbringing.

The girls’ father and mother already had five children when they were born. It was highly unusual at the time for quintuplets to be born, let alone to survive. All five girls were taken to become a tourist attraction.

Annette and Cecile were born in 1934 together with three sisters Yvonne, Emilie and Marie.  Their mother was just 25 at the time.

Annette and Cecile were born in 1934 together with three sisters Yvonne, Emilie and Marie. Their mother was just 25 at the time.

The Dionne sisters were born on May 28, 1934. Their mother, Elzire, was 25 at the time. They are seen soon after, wrapped in owls

The Dionne sisters were born on May 28, 1934. Their mother, Elzire, was 25 at the time. They are seen soon after, wrapped in owls

Not long after their birth, the girls were snatched from their parents and placed under the care of doctors and nurses in Ontario, Canada.

Not long after their birth, the girls were snatched from their parents and placed under the care of doctors and nurses in Ontario, Canada.

Not long after their birth, the girls were snatched from their parents and placed under the care of doctors and nurses in Ontario, Canada.

The girls were promoted in movies and memorabilia around the world, but as adults they have been told that they never felt loved by their families

The girls were promoted in movies and memorabilia around the world, but as adults they have been told that they never felt loved by their families

The girls were promoted in movies and memorabilia around the world, but as adults they have been told that they never felt loved by their families

The girls were transferred to Dafoe Hospital and Nursery at the age of four.  They can be seen above in 1936, two years old

The girls were taken to Dafoe Hospital and Nursery at the age of four. They can be seen above in 1936, two years old

In a seasonal photo to ring in the new year during their time at the nursery.  From left to right: Annette, Yvonne, Emilie, Cecile and Marie

In a seasonal photo to ring in the new year during their time at the nursery. From left to right: Annette, Yvonne, Emilie, Cecile and Marie

They were returned to their family at the age of 9 and all five girls lived to adulthood, but they were abused by their father for years.

The girls, aged four, are pictured in their pajamas on Christmas Eve with candles in hand

The girls, aged four, are pictured in their pajamas on Christmas Eve with candles in hand

Now Annette and Cecile live quietly in Canada.

A Facebook page has been set up in their honor.

The organizers share a birthday message with them every year and also share updates about the Dionne Quintuplets Museum

Despite their parents’ protests and the brutal exploitation of them by the state, Cecile said they were happy with the care of the nurses and doctors who cared for them at Dafoe Hospital and Nursery, their purpose-built asylum that became known as Quintland.

“Contrary to what people think, it wasn’t bad there.

“We were young and carefree,” Cecile said in a rare 2016 interview with the Montreal Gazette.

The girls’ father, Oliva, fought tirelessly to get them back under his wing and in 1943, when they were nine, he succeeded.

He ran a gift shop next door to Quintland while they lived there. Thousands flocked to watch the girls as they played outside.

When they returned to their biological family, the girls were treated horribly.

“Nine is not an appropriate age to be adopted. We weren’t prepared and neither was the family.’

They were bullied by their other siblings, who had turned against them by their parents, and sexually abused by their father.

The mansion they moved into was paid for with money they had earned, but were unaware of, in the nursery and they were paraded across the country by their parents to perform.

Heartbreakingly, Cecile shared how in the deep depression of her adolescence, when she was still treated as a tourist attraction, she longed to have her own children to take care of.

“I realized when I was very young that I wasn’t happy. I’ve always wanted a girl like me,” she said.

'Contrary to what people think, it wasn't bad there.

‘Contrary to what people think, it wasn’t bad there. “We were young and carefree,” Cecile said in a rare 2016 interview with the Montreal Gazette about their time under state care

The girls were visited by their parents while they were on 'Quintland'.  They are shown in one photo taken before being returned to their mother and father at the age of nine

The girls were visited by their parents while they were on ‘Quintland’. They are shown in one photo taken before being returned to their mother and father at the age of nine

The girls at their confirmation when they were children.  They said they were treated well when under the care of the state

The girls at their confirmation when they were children. They said they were treated well when under the care of the state

Sometime after being released back into the care of their family at the age of nine, the girls were given two bicycles by their father (above)

Sometime after being released back into the care of their family at the age of nine, the girls were given two bicycles by their father (above)

The sisters celebrate their 14th birthday with a five-tier cake.  They had moved back in with their parents and lived in a mansion they bought with their own earnings

The sisters celebrate their 14th birthday with a five-tier cake. They had moved back in with their parents and lived in a mansion they bought with their own earnings

In 1950, the then 15-year-old sisters Dionne performed at the Alfred.  E Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner on their first visit to New York

In 1950, the then 15-year-old sisters Dionne performed at the Alfred. E Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner on their first visit to New York

The sisters showed up in St Paul, Minnesota, when they were 17 to speak at their first formal US press conference

The sisters showed up in St Paul, Minnesota, when they were 17 to speak at their first formal US press conference

Emilie was the first to die.  She died of a stroke in 1954 - 20 years old.  People flocked to the parental home after that

Emilie was the first to die. She died of a stroke in 1954 – 20 years old. People flocked to the parental home after that

Silent goodbye to Emily.  Callander, Ontario.  The four surviving Dionne quintuplets Cecile, Marie, Yvonne and Annette (left to right), stand with sad faces next to their beloved sister-quint Emilie's bier in a silent farewell just before the funeral

Silent goodbye to Emily. Callander, Ontario. The four surviving Dionne quintuplets Cecile, Marie, Yvonne and Annette (from left to right), stand with sad faces next to their beloved sister-quint Emilie’s bier in a silent farewell just before the funeral

In 1995, Yvonne (left), Annette (center) and Cecile (right) pose with a copy of a book written about their lives

In 1995, Yvonne (left), Annette (center) and Cecile (right) pose with a copy of a book written about their lives

Cecile in 2016. In her first interview in almost two decades, she told how she was now forced to live in a care home

Cecile in 2016. In her first interview in almost two decades, she told how she was now forced to live in a care home

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