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Surfer was almost attacked by a great white shark on the Gold Coast

A chilling photo shows how close a surfer got to being attacked by a great white shark just days after boardrider was torn to death on the Gold Coast

  • Linda Marchant Sinclair shared images of a shark tooth that sat in her foil board
  • She said the attack took place while she was surfing in Cabarita, north NSW
  • Her encounter has sparked a desperate warning to other surfers in the area
  • Nick Slater died after a shark attack on Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast

A surfer shared a chilling photo of her board after meeting a shark just days after a longboarder was ripped to death on a nearby beach.

Linda Marchant Sinclair shared on Facebook images of what appeared to be a shark tooth stuck in her foil board.

She said the attack took place while she was surfing on Wednesday in Cabarita, north NSW.

Her intimate encounter has sparked a desperate warning to other surfers in the area.

“Don’t surf Caba Headland… Big shark attacked foil,” Mrs. Sinclair wrote.

Linda Marchant Sinclair shared on Facebook images of what appeared to be a shark tooth stuck in her foil board

Linda Marchant Sinclair shared on Facebook images of what appeared to be a shark tooth stuck in her foil board

She said the attack took place while she was surfing on Wednesday in Cabarita, north NSW

She said the attack took place while she was surfing on Wednesday in Cabarita, north NSW

Her intimate encounter has sparked a desperate warning to other surfers in the area

Her intimate encounter has sparked a desperate warning to other surfers in the area

She said the attack took place while she was surfing on Wednesday in Cabarita, north NSW

The photos come just days after a longboarder was beaten to death on nearby Greenmount Beach (photo)

The photos come just days after a longboarder was beaten to death on nearby Greenmount Beach (photo)

The photos come just days after a longboarder was beaten to death on nearby Greenmount Beach (photo)

Cabarita is 13.5 miles from Coolangatta, where 46-year-old real estate agent Nick Slater was murdered last week.

His attack took place where swimmers are protected by shark nets. Mr. Slater was one of at least 40 surfers in the water when he was attacked and later succumbed to his injuries on the beach.

His death is just the second deadly shark attack on one of Queensland’s 85 beaches protected by nets and drum lines since 1962, the state government said.

Three-time surfing world champion Mick Fanning surfs at nearby Snapper Rocks the morning Mr Slater was fatally assaulted.

The 39-year-old, who survived a shark attack in the final of the J Bay Open in South Africa in 2015, called for an update to Queensland’s shark management strategies in the wake of Mr Slater’s death.

Greenmount Beach has shark nets on the outside of the lineup, but Fanning said the incident proves the system needs to be upgraded.

‘It’s just a bit outdated. We haven’t visited them for a long time. We see south of the border that they have the smart buoys and tagged sharks are pinged and we can see where those sharks are through an app and I don’t see why we shouldn’t have that on the Gold Coast, ‘he said. Courier mail.

Nick Slater (pictured) was attacked by a shark off Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast

Nick Slater (pictured) was attacked by a shark off Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast

Nick Slater (pictured) was attacked by a shark off Greenmount Beach on the Gold Coast

The tooth left in Mr. Slater's surfboard has been removed for analysis to find out what kind of shark attacked him

The tooth left in Mr. Slater's surfboard has been removed for analysis to find out what kind of shark attacked him

The tooth left in Mr. Slater’s surfboard has been removed for analysis to find out what kind of shark attacked him

Fanning said Mr. Slater’s death had shocked the Gold Coast surfing community.

‘We didn’t think it would happen so close and just the images of it, it’s horrible. Everyone is shocked and our hearts go out to the Slater family and all of their friends, it’s just shocking, ‘he said.

Fanning suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and recurring nightmares in the years following his shark incident.

Due to his recovery, he began working with National Geographic on a two-part documentary called Save this Shark, which premieres Tuesday.

In the film, Fanning speaks with leading shark scientists and conservationists to share a broader understanding of shark habits.

Fanning disagrees with the shark culling, which he believes is a shock many take after an attack.

He said we need to do more research on shark patterns to learn to live in harmony with the ocean predators.

‘We have to learn why it happens. Why are we seeing so much more activity here? That’s what we need to find out instead of just going to slaughter the ocean, ”Fanning said.

Mick Fanning (pictured) has called for an update on Queensland's shark management strategies

Mick Fanning (pictured) has called for an update on Queensland's shark management strategies

Mick Fanning (pictured) has called for an update on Queensland’s shark management strategies

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