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Supreme Court issues rulings on school vouchers for Christian schools but NOT abortion

The Supreme Court issued a series of rulings on Tuesday, including one allowing education vouchers to attend religious schools in Maine — without doing anything about a major abortion case that could lead to Roe v. Wade being dropped.

The court’s actions came as the nation braced for potential shockwaves from an abortion ruling, following the leak of a draft opinion by Judge Samuel Alito on the abortion case.

Protesters had gathered around the Supreme Court awaiting a ruling. The building is already surrounded by a high fence that went up after the draft leaked out last month.

If judges haven’t changed their minds since Alito wrote the draft, it would result in the overturning of the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which provides for abortion rights.

An abortion rights advocate was arrested before the United States Supreme Court in Washington, US, on June 21, 2022. The Supreme Court is surrounded by tall metal fences.  It issued five rulings on Tuesday, but none dealt with abortion

An abortion rights advocate was arrested before the United States Supreme Court in Washington, US, on June 21, 2022. The Supreme Court is surrounded by tall metal fences. It issued five rulings on Tuesday, but none dealt with abortion

The case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, is one of the most closely scrutinized cases on the court.

One of the court rulings was one that allowed more public funding from religious entities to rule in favor of two Christian families who were challenging a tuition program in Maine that banned private schools that promote religion. religious organizations due to the independent choices of private benefit recipients not in violation of the establishment clause

“A neutral benefit program in which public funds flow to religious organizations through the independent choices of private benefit recipients does not violate the establishment clause” of the Constitution, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the majority of the 6-3 opinion.

Outgoing judge Stephen Breyer was the author of a blistering dissent. He said the court has “never before ruled what the Court rules today, which is that a state may (not may) use state funds to pay for religious education as part of an education program designed to provide free state-wide public education.”

Protesters anticipate an important decision that Roe v. Wade .  could meet

Protesters anticipate an important decision that Roe v. Wade . could meet

Instead, the court issued cases pertaining to a legal standard for gun convictions and the use of state funds for religious schools

Instead, the court issued cases pertaining to a legal standard for gun convictions and the use of state funds for religious schools

The rulings come amid tensions at the court, which has a conservative majority of 6-3

The rulings come amid tensions at the court, which has a conservative majority of 6-3

Chief Justice John Roberts ordered a leak investigation after the astonishing leak of a draft abortion advisory

Chief Justice John Roberts ordered a leak investigation after the astonishing leak of a draft abortion advisory

Justice Sonia Sotomayor offered her own dissent. “What a difference five years makes. In 2017, I feared that the Court was ‘leading'[ing] U.S . † † to a place where separation of church and state is a constitutional slogan, not a constitutional obligation.’ Today the Court leads us to a place where the separation of church and state becomes a constitutional violation. †

The decision builds on the 2020 Supreme Court ruling in a Montana case that paved the way for more taxpayer money to flow to religious schools.

Maine provides public funds to pay tuition at private high schools of a family’s choice in some sparsely populated areas of the northeastern state that do not have public high schools. The schools receiving this educational support under the program must be “non-sectarian” and excluded if they promote a particular religion and present material “through the lens of that faith”.

THE 26 STATES STAND UP TO CONNECT ABORTION IF ROE V. WADE IS FORMAL WRONG

Alabama

Arizona

Arkansas

Idaho

Kentucky

Louisiana

Michigan

Mississippi

Missouri

North Dakota

south dakota

Oklahoma

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Georgia, Iowa

Ohio

south carolina

There are 18 states that have near-total bans on their books, while four others have a time limit and four others are likely to impose another ban if Roe is destroyed.

There are 18 states that have near-total bans on their books, while four others have a time limit and four others are likely to impose another ban if Roe is destroyed.

Protesters gather, sing and hold placards outside Washington Supreme Court on May 2 — the night the draft opinion was leaked

Protesters gather, sing and hold placards outside Washington Supreme Court on May 2 — the night the draft opinion was leaked

Roberts criticized the state program, which he said “works to identify and exclude otherwise eligible schools based on their religious practice.”

The ruling was the latest example from the Supreme Court, with its increasingly assertive conservative majority, making the expansion of religious freedom a high priority in recent years. The judges were open to allegations from plaintiffs – often conservative Christians – of government hostility to religion, including in the educational context.

The families in the Maine case sought taxpayer money to send their children to two Christian schools that integrate religion into their classrooms and have policies against gay and transgender students and staff. The First Amendment also prohibits government endorsement of any particular religion.

The court also ruled in the US v. Taylor case in favor of a defendant whose sentence was extended for an additional 10 years on the basis of a Hobbs Act conviction for participating in a “crime of violence.”

The court found in its 7-2 ruling that portion of a conviction related to attempted theft did not meet the standard under the Hobbs Act, which pertains to theft affecting interstate commerce, since the standard set by the courts used do not show the use of force or attempted use of force.

The case involved a 2003 robbery by defendant Justin Taylor, whose accomplice shot a marijuana buyer.

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