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Supreme Court hands down decision on praying in schools – but tRemain in Mexico fate still undecided

Supreme Court makes decisions on praying in public schools, crack convictions and pill factories – but the fate of Trump-era policy Stay in Mexico is still at stake with just days left

  • The Supreme Court issued three more opinions on Monday
  • It has yet to rule on a case that could force President Biden to continue enforcing Trump-era Remain in Mexico migration policy
  • Lower courts have prevented Biden administration from ending protocol
  • A ruling on Monday sided with an ex-high school coach, who was put on leave after the school said his prayers violated the separation of church and state
  • There are only a few days left to give the remaining four opinions

The Supreme Court issued three more opinions on Monday, but has not yet ruled on the case that could force the Biden administration to return asylum seekers to Mexico.

With only four opinions left, the Supreme Court is gearing up for its summer break before taking up new cases in late September after it delivered a stellar ruling Friday that overturned abortion protections in the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade case. †

Of the remaining cases, the ruling on the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) will have the most immediate impact, a policy adopted and enacted under former President Donald Trump to help quell the crisis on the southern border.

MPP, better known as the Remain in Mexico Policy, was launched in 2019 and allowed the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to send non-Mexican citizens who entered the US illegally back to Mexico while they await their immigration process. .

Before this policy was introduced under Trump, migrants awaiting proceedings were either detained in the US or released into the country and expected to return for their hearings, which many never did.

Lower courts have already blocked President Joe Biden from ending the policy, but the federal government has appealed the case to the Supreme Court.

It’s not clear how the case will progress, but with a conservative majority of 6-3 and three Trump-designated judges, many believe the policy can be upheld.

The Supreme Court issued three more opinions on Monday, but has not yet ruled on a case that could force the Biden administration to continue enforcing Trump-era migration policies.

The Supreme Court issued three more opinions on Monday, but has not yet ruled on a case that could force the Biden administration to continue enforcing Trump-era migration policies.

May saw the highest number of border crossings since Joe Biden took office at Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and encountered 239,416 migrants at the border last month

May saw the highest number of border crossings since Joe Biden took office at Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and encountered 239,416 migrants at the border last month

Critics call MPP inhumane and argue that it exposes credible asylum seekers who face dangerous and appalling conditions in their home countries.

While the case examines immigration law, it also questions a president’s control over these policies.

The first advice issued Monday ruled in favor of a former Washington high school football coach, who was sent on leave after his team’s games to pray at the 50-yard line.

The case pits the First Amendment right to freedom of expression against the separation of church and state, and the Supreme Court ruling could pave the way for fewer restrictions on religious freedom in schools.

In a 6-3 conservative line, the ruling sided with former coach Joseph Kennedy, who was put on furlough after the school said his prayers violated the separation of church and state.

Another ruling Monday in the so-called ‘pill mill’ case places the burden of proof on the government to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a physician ‘knewly or intentionally acted in an unauthorized manner’ in prescribing opioid painkillers.

The case comes amid a nationwide opioid crisis and casts doubt on doctors’ ability to use their judgment to dispense a dangerous drug. Xiulu Ruan v. United States also raised questions about what action can be taken against doctors who prescribe opioids without medical justification.

Attorneys for two doctors convicted of prescribing opioids without valid medical justification appealed their convictions and sentences, saying a jury should have been able to assess whether the doctors reasonably believed they were acting within professional boundaries.

A ruling on Monday sided with former high school coach Joseph Kennedy (in sweatshirt, right), who was put on furlough after the school said his prayers violated the separation of church and state.  Kennedy said he would be happy to return to the district to coach again if he wins the case

A ruling on Monday sided with former high school coach Joseph Kennedy (in sweatshirt, right), who was put on furlough after the school said his prayers violated the separation of church and state. Kennedy said he would be happy to return to the district to coach again if he wins the case

The Supreme Court: Sitting from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Comey Barrett

The Supreme Court: Sitting from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Comey Barrett

Monday’s third and final verdict is a victory for drug offenders as the court ruled 5-4 that district courts may consider intervening to reduce sentences related to crack and cocaine-related offenses.

Liberal judge Sonia Sotomayor co-wrote the majority opinion with fellow left-wing judges Steven Breyer and Elena Kagan; conservative judges Neil Gorusch, Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh. The other four conservatives disagreed.

In addition to MPP, the court is ready to advise in three other cases in the coming days — one on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) power to regulate emissions from power plants, another on federal protections for veterans returning to the military. workforce and a third on the ability of states to prosecute non-Indigenous citizens who commit crimes against Native Americans on reserve land.

The latest case comes after a 2020 Supreme opinion written by Judge Gorsuch and joined by the liberals on the bench that determined Oklahoma was incapable of prosecuting a Native American citizen who committed a crime on reserve land.

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