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Adut Akech (photo) born in South Sudan was interviewed by the Who Magazine and discussed the issue of race and how people view refugees

An Australian supermodel whose interview was shown in a magazine alongside a photo of another model, was told about the blunder days after printing.

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Adut Akech, who was born in South Sudan, was interviewed by Who Magazine and discussed the issue of race and how people view refugees.

The magazine has since been criticized after Akech released a statement that her interview was marred by an administrative error that depicted fellow model Flavia Lazarus instead of her.

Akech only came to know Sunday 72 hours after the mistake was made on Thursday morning about the change.

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Adut Akech (photo) born in South Sudan was interviewed by the Who Magazine and discussed the issue of race and how people view refugees

Adut Akech (photo) born in South Sudan was interviewed by the Who Magazine and discussed the issue of race and how people view refugees

The distribution of Who Magazine claimed that the model depicted above - actually Flavia Lazarus - was Akech
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The distribution of Who Magazine claimed that the model depicted above - actually Flavia Lazarus - was Akech

The distribution of Who Magazine claimed that the model depicted above – actually Flavia Lazarus – was Akech

Akech can also be seen in the prestigious September edition of Vogue Australia (pictured above)

Akech can also be seen in the prestigious September edition of Vogue Australia (pictured above)

Akech can also be seen in the prestigious September edition of Vogue Australia (pictured above)

A representative of the magazine contacted Akech to officially apologize, but the 19-year-old said The age the apology should have come directly from the editor.

& # 39; I think they hoped nobody would notice, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; When I found out three days ago, I was angry, I was pissed off, hurt, you know, many things. I think I've calmed down now. & # 39;

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Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino.

She also recently appeared on the prestigious September cover of British Vogue, guest edited by the Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle.

Now she has set her sights on tackling stigma in the industry and hopes the incident sheds light on unintended racism, particularly within the Australian industry.

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

Strong women: Akech (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle
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Strong women: Akech (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle

Strong women: Akech (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle

She previously claimed that the switch would not have happened if white models were involved, and that it does not respect her entire race.

# We all look different … I honestly don't understand why it keeps happening … it must stop because it is offensive, it is disrespectful, it is rude and (it suggests) that we are treated differently .

& # 39; I have never heard a white girl named (wrongly), but it happened to me and other girls with dark skin a lot. It's just ignorant. It is racist in a sense. If you are going to do it, at least do it to everyone. & # 39;

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The 19-year-old said the blunder was almost ironic given the context of the interview, in which she hoped to shed a light on racism and change the way people view refugees & # 39 ;.

Instead, her quotes were displayed alongside photos of the fellow African model Flavia Lazarus.

Although the magazine has since apologized for both models, Akech said The Daily Telegraph the apology would not undo the pain and shame.

& # 39; It's racist, but of course I know it wasn't intentional. It was a mistake that should not happen, & she said.

Model Flavia Lazarus was actually depicted

Model Flavia Lazarus was actually depicted

Supermodel Adut Akech spoke about her disappointment about the blunder
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Supermodel Adut Akech spoke about her disappointment about the blunder

Model Flavia Lazarus (left) was published in the magazine when they intended to share photos of Adut Akech (right) they interviewed

Lazarus said the incident brought her to tears.

& # 39; We don't have the same head shape, we don't look the same, except we have the same skin color and a shaved head, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; I feel bad for Akech. She has torn off her ass and you feel invisible. & # 39;

WHO IS ADUT AKECH?

Adut Akech is a 19-year-old supermodel who grew up in a refugee camp in Kenya before moving to Adelaide with her family.

She was initially scouted by modeling agencies as a 13-year-old, but only started her career at the age of 16 when she joined prestigious Chadwick Models in Australia.

Her career rocketed from there.

She has collaborated with some of the largest brands in the industry, including Saint Laurent, Valentino, Calvin Klein and Tom Ford.

She is now the ambassador of Melbourne Fashion Week 2019.

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A statement attributed to a Who Magazine spokesperson claimed that the incident was an unfortunate misunderstanding and was not intended to offend.

The PR agency OPR of the City of Melbourne allegedly made a mistake when sending files to Who Magazine, which resulted in confusion.

When organizing the interview, they reportedly sent a file with images of Lazarus, instead of Akech.

& # 39; Unfortunately, the agency that set up our interview with Adut Akech provided us with the wrong photo to accompany the piece & # 39 ;, said a spokesperson for Who Magazine.

& # 39; Who spoke directly with Adut to explain how the error occurred and sincerely apologize.

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& # 39; We also apologize to Flavia Lazarus for the printing error. & # 39;

The magazine also said they hoped the mistake would help create a discussion about diversity.

& # 39; Hopefully, because of more pressure from people, more people will talk about this problem in the industry and tackle it frontally. & # 39;

The 19-year-old global sensation said the mix beat the goal of sharing its story completely (Photo: Adut Akech at the David Jones Spring Summer 2018 Collections Launch)

The 19-year-old global sensation said the mix beat the goal of sharing its story completely (Photo: Adut Akech at the David Jones Spring Summer 2018 Collections Launch)

The 19-year-old global sensation said the mix beat the goal of sharing its story completely (Photo: Adut Akech at the David Jones Spring Summer 2018 Collections Launch)

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While in town for Melbourne Fashion Week, Akech made time to talk to Who Magazine about what she had been up to lately and took the opportunity to discuss diversity and acceptance in the industry.

& # 39; I want to change the way people look at refugees & # 39 ;, she said in the position.

She spoke of problems that were dear to her, born in South Sudan and raised in a Kenyan refugee camp before she and her family moved to Adelaide, where she said the mix was all the more difficult to handle.

& # 39; This has upset me, this has made me angry … to me this is unacceptable and unforgivable under all circumstances. & # 39;

She said this was not the first time that such a confusion took place, citing an incident in which she was named with the name of another model of the same ethnicity.

& # 39; For people in the industry this is not good and you should do it better, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; Australia, you have a lot of work to do. You have to do better. & # 39;

Akech said she hopes her experience will generate conversation and encourage diversity and understanding.

Melbourne Fashion Week has released the above statement on their Instagram account

Melbourne Fashion Week has released the above statement on their Instagram account

Melbourne Fashion Week has released the above statement on their Instagram account

Kerri-Anne Kennerley was a person who defended Who Magazine for the confusion and claimed that she too is confused with other white celebrities.

She said Tuesday in Studio 10 that it was a simple mistake and had nothing to do with racism.

& # 39; I just think she (Akech) is going too far if she thinks it's all about racism … someone just made a mistake, & # 39; she said.

Kennerley admitted that although the error was a & # 39; major error & # 39; could be seen, she was mistaken in different magazines in different magazines for 60 minutes journalist Liz Hayes.

Akech said she hopes her experience will generate conversation and encourage diversity and understanding.

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino

FOLLOW THE FULL STATEMENT FROM AKECH

& # 39; Over the past few days, I have been thinking deeply about how to handle this situation that does not suit me.

& # 39; For those who don't know, last week

& # 39; Who Magazine (Australia) has published an article about me. In the interview I spoke about how people view the attitude of refugees and people towards color in general.

& # 39; With the article, they published a large photo that said it was me. But it was from another black girl.

& # 39; This has upset me, has made me angry, it has given me a huge disrespect, and is unacceptable and unforgivable to me in all circumstances.

& # 39; Not only do I feel personally offended and not respected, but I also feel that my entire race has not been respected, so I think it is important that I address this issue.

& # 39; The person who clearly did this was the thought I was in that photo and that's not okay. This is very important because of what I was talking about in my interview.

& # 39; As a result of this event, I feel it has defeated the goal I stand for and what I was talking about. It shows that people are very ignorant and narrow-minded that they think that every black girl or African people looks the same.

& # 39; I feel that this would not have happened with a white model. My goal for this post is not to bash Who Magazine – they immediately apologized to me – but I feel like I need to publicly express how I feel.

& # 39; This has touched me deeply and we must start an important conversation that must take place. I am sure I am not the first person to have experienced this and that it must stop.

& # 39; I have been given the name of other models that happen to be of the same ethnicity, I find it very ignorant, rude and disrespectful of the both of us because we know this doesn't happen with white models.

& # 39; I want this to be a bit of a wake-up call for people in the industry, it's not OK and you have to do better.

& # 39; Large publications must ensure that they check things before they are published, especially if they are real stories and interviews and not just some rumors.

& # 39; For those who work at shows and shoots, it's important that you don't swap model names.

& # 39; Australia, you have a lot of work to do and you have to do better and that goes to the rest of the industry. & # 39;

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