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Sunspot THREE TIMES the size of Earth is facing directly at our planet

A dark sunspot pointed directly at Earth has doubled in size in just 24 hours and could potentially emit mid-range flares in the near future.

Tony Phillips, the author of SpaceWeather.com, wrote on Wednesday: ‘Yesterday sunspot AR3038 was large. Today it is huge.’

And it is now said to be three times the size of the Earth.

Sunspot AR30398 not only looks directly at our planet, but also has an unstable beta-gamma magnetic field that harbors enough energy to cause short-term radio disturbances.

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A dark sunspot pointed directly at Earth has doubled in size in just 24 hours and could potentially emit mid-range flares in the near future. Tony Phillips, the author of SpaceWeather.com, wrote on Wednesday, “Yesterday sunspot AR3038 was large. Today it’s huge’

Sunspots are dark areas of the sun where it is cooler than other parts of the surface. Solar flares form close to these dark areas of the star.

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections emanate from these regions, and when they explode toward Earth, they can result in geomagnetic storms that produce beautiful auroras and endanger power grids and satellites.

AR3038 is definitely a big sunspot — a beachgoer in New Jerseys spotted it on the sun as it rose over the Atlantic.

A pair of huge sunspot swarms, some large enough to devour the Earth as a whole, appeared on the sun’s surface in April.

Sunspot AR30398 not only looks directly at our planet, but also has an unstable beta-gamma magnetic field that harbors enough energy to cause short-term radio disturbances

Sunspot AR30398 not only looks directly at our planet, but also has an unstable beta-gamma magnetic field that harbors enough energy to cause short-term radio disturbances

The two active regions, named AR2993 and AR2994, sent scientists into overdrive to learn whether Earth would brace itself for powerful solar flares — but thankfully none were sent our way.

In early April, however, Earth narrowly missed a plasma ejection, linked to a sunspot group that had previously appeared on the star.

The recent increase in the sun’s activity is the result of approaching the most active phase in its 11-year solar cycle – peak activity in 2024.

Studies have shown that the level of solar activity currently taking place is about the same as it was 11 years ago, at the same point in the last cycle.

“I’m sure we’ll see larger active regions in the coming years,” NASA solar physicist Dean Pesnell said in an interview with Live Science

“Active regions 2993 and 2994 are medium in size and do not represent the best that solar cycle 25 can produce.”

Jan Janssens of the Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence in Brussels, told Live Science that multiple solar flares and coronal mass ejections “are typical at this stage of the solar cycle,” with some heading toward Earth but missing Earth.

A pair of huge sunspot swarms, some large enough to devour the Earth as a whole, appeared on the sun's surface in April

A pair of huge sunspot swarms, some large enough to devour the Earth as a whole, appeared on the sun’s surface in April

“As the solar cycle heads towards its maximum, increasingly complex sunspot regions become visible, which can then produce solar flares.”

Solar flares have letter classes, with A class the weakest, then B, C and M class, with X class the strongest of the categories. They are then given a size – small numbers represent smaller torches within the class.

An X1 outburst is ten times less powerful than the most intense solar flare possible, and the most powerful ever, from 2003, overwhelmed sensors like an X28.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center found that Sunday’s solar flare caused a power outage at certain radio frequencies below 30 MHz in Southeast Asia and Australia.

Despite the flare causing radio interference, the flare’s plasma will not hit Earth.

“Flares and coronal mass ejections will become more frequent in the coming years, increasing the risk level from solar activity,” Pesnell told Live Science.

There has been no extreme CME or solar flare in the modern world — the latest was the Carrington event in 1859 — that triggered a geomagnetic storm with aurora appearing globally, as well as fires at telegraph stations.

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