Suicide terrorists in Sri Lanka who have studied in Great Britain, say the country's defense minister

One of the suicide bombers in Sri Lanka who studied in Britain and Australia says the country's defense minister

  • Sri Lanka, Deputy Minister of Defense, says a suicide bomber has studied in the UK
  • The number of confirmed dead in the Easter Sunday attacks has risen to 359
  • It is believed that there were nine suicide bombers, eight were identified

One of the suicide bombers in Easter Sunday studied terrorist attacks in the UK today.

Deputy Minister of Defense, Ruwan Wijewardene, also said at a press conference that an explosion in Colombo was previously a controlled explosion on a motorcycle near the Savoy hotel.

The number of confirmed deaths had risen to 359.

The minister also revealed that there were nine suicide bombers and eight have been identified so far, and they used two safe houses.

A view of the Saint Sebastian church, which was damaged on Sunday morning in Negombo, north of Colombo, by the explosion

A view of the Saint Sebastian church, which was damaged on Sunday morning in Negombo, north of Colombo, by the explosion

Wreck: Sri Lankan security personnel inspect the damage to the Sanctuary of St. Anthony after the Easter Sunday bombing

Wreck: Sri Lankan security personnel inspect the damage to the Sanctuary of St. Anthony after the Easter Sunday bombing

Wreck: Sri Lankan security personnel inspect the damage to the Sanctuary of St. Anthony after the Easter Sunday bombing

He confirmed that 60 people have been arrested and 32 are still in custody. They are all Sri Lankan.

It is claimed that two sons of a rich spice trader carried out the suicide attacks.

The Muslim brothers, Ilham Ibrahim and Inshaf, blew themselves up as guests in the queue for breakfast at the Shangri-La and Cinnamon Grand hotels in the capital.

They were in their late twenties and operated their own & # 39; family cell & # 39 ;, an investigating officer said yesterday while the Sri Lankan police continue investigating the bombing.

The Muslim brothers blew themselves up as guests in line for breakfast at the Shangri-La (pictured) and Cinnamon Grand hotels in the capital

The Muslim brothers blew themselves up as guests in line for breakfast at the Shangri-La (pictured) and Cinnamon Grand hotels in the capital

The Muslim brothers blew themselves up as guests in line for breakfast at the Shangri-La (pictured) and Cinnamon Grand hotels in the capital

ISIS has released an image of the suspected suicide bombers. It is unclear which two in the group are the brothers. The center shown is claimed by the national Thowfeek Jamaath leader Moulvi Zahran Hashim

ISIS has released an image of the suspected suicide bombers. It is unclear which two in the group are the brothers. The center shown is claimed by the national Thowfeek Jamaath leader Moulvi Zahran Hashim

ISIS has released an image of the suspected suicide bombers. It is unclear which two in the group are the brothers. The center shown is claimed by the national Thowfeek Jamaath leader Moulvi Zahran Hashim

The brothers had been involved with their father, Yoonus Ibrahim & # 39; s lucrative Colombo spice export company, researchers said.

A focus of the research will be to find out if there was any foreign influence in their radicalization and how the children of such a rich family had become involved, an official source said.

The pair was the most important members of the Islamic National Thowheeth Jama & # 39; ath (NTJ) group, the official added.

ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attacks, but the government has blamed the NTJ.

Family members mourn next to the coffin of one of the victims of the suicide bombing in the Saint Sebastian church in Negombo

Family members mourn next to the coffin of one of the victims of the suicide bombing in the Saint Sebastian church in Negombo

Family members mourn next to the coffin of one of the victims of the suicide bombing in the Saint Sebastian church in Negombo

Burial for the dead began today in Negombo, pictured. The attacks have led to local and international outrage and have been condemned by Sri Lankan Muslim groups

Burial for the dead began today in Negombo, pictured. The attacks have led to local and international outrage and have been condemned by Sri Lankan Muslim groups

Burial for the dead began today in Negombo, pictured. The attacks have led to local and international outrage and have been condemned by Sri Lankan Muslim groups

A minister said Tuesday that the bombers may have taken revenge for attacks on two New Zealand mosques last month, who have left 50 dead.

Investigators said it was not known if the brothers were in contact with the other bombers.

The first wave of attacks occurred during busy Easter services at churches in the cities of Colombo, Negombo and Batticaloa.

More bombs tore through three luxury hotels in the capital, Colombo: the Kingsbury, the Shangri La and the Cinnamon Grand.

The group also planned an attack on a fourth hotel, but the suicide bomber failed to make his device explode or decided to do so, according to official sources.

The police are currently also on the hunt for a van and a truck that is believed to carry explosives, News First reports. They are also looking for three motorcycles, a taxi and a van.

At least 39 aliens were killed in the attack and more than 500 injured.

Sri Lanka has declared a state of emergency and started a desperate hunt for more attacks.

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