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Emily Zamourka, 52, who became an internet sensation after being filmed while she was singing in the subway, has not received a single cent of several fundraising calls to help her, a family friend told DailyMail.com exclusively

A homeless woman from Los Angeles who became an internet sensation after she was filmed while she was singing on the subway did not receive a single cent of several fundraising calls to help her, a family friend told DailyMail.com exclusively.

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Emily Zamourka, 52, went viral at the end of September when a Los Angeles police officer filmed her while she was singing Puccini's Occio Babbino Caro in a subway station.

She was quickly offered performances and recording deals, and a GoFundMe page was set up so that she could replace her destroyed $ 10k violin and safe enclosure.

But Emily's best friend from Paulina Zavatin University, 51, told DailyMail.com that Emily is still homeless and has not received any money from fundraising – while a GoFundMe page has raised $ 80,500 and still accepts donations.

Paulina, however, revealed that Emily could be reunited with her dying mother Ekaterina, who died only two days after seeing her long-lost daughter.

Emily Zamourka, 52, who became an internet sensation after being filmed while she was singing in the subway, has not received a single cent of several fundraising calls to help her, a family friend told DailyMail.com exclusively

Emily Zamourka, 52, who became an internet sensation after being filmed while she was singing in the subway, has not received a single cent of several fundraising calls to help her, a family friend told DailyMail.com exclusively

Emily's best friend from Paulina Zavatin University, 51, told DailyMail.com that Emily is still homeless and has not received any money from fundraising - while one page has raised $ 80,500 and still accepts donations
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Emily's best friend from Paulina Zavatin University, 51, told DailyMail.com that Emily is still homeless and has not received any money from fundraising - while one page has raised $ 80,500 and still accepts donations

Emily's best friend from Paulina Zavatin University, 51, told DailyMail.com that Emily is still homeless and has not received any money from fundraising – while one page has raised $ 80,500 and still accepts donations

Paulina, however, revealed that Emily could be reunited with her dying mother Ekaterina, (circled) who died only two days after seeing her long-lost daughter

Paulina, however, revealed that Emily could be reunited with her dying mother Ekaterina, (circled) who died only two days after seeing her long-lost daughter

Paulina, however, revealed that Emily could be reunited with her dying mother Ekaterina, (circled) who died only two days after seeing her long-lost daughter

Paulina was able to speak to Emily by telephone after DailyMail.com could pass on her contacts to another friend of Emily.

The old friends met during their studies at the university while they were in the former Soviet Union.

Paulina said she talked to Emily – whom she called Liuda, shortly before her birth name Liudmila, for over an hour by phone and revealed that Emily was still homeless despite the tens of thousands of dollars raised for her.

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She said: & # 39; When I spoke to her, she was still living on the street.

Paulina was able to talk to Emily after DailyMail.com could pass on her contacts to another friend of Emily

Paulina was able to talk to Emily after DailyMail.com could pass on her contacts to another friend of Emily

Paulina was able to talk to Emily after DailyMail.com could pass on her contacts to another friend of Emily

& # 39; She had not received any money that people collected for her.

& # 39; But she would never ask for money, not even knowing that people are collecting for her. & # 39;

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Paulina explained that the only money that Emily received came from a performance at an Italian festival in downtown San Pedro in early October.

She added: & # 39; She is probably happy with people trying to help her, but she is very modest and ashamed that they have become homeless in this situation. & # 39;

Paulina said that Emily finds it difficult to accept charity and never wanted to depend on anyone.

& # 39; As I told you before, she never counted on anyone, & # 39; said Paulina, a music teacher in the former Soviet Republic of Moldova, where Emily originally came from.

& # 39; She just wanted to earn, work hard. She would do anything to prevent someone else from paying for her. & # 39;

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Michael Trujillo, organizer of the main GoFundMe for Emily, said in a statement to DailyMail.com: “The money is still waiting for Emily and I communicate with GoFundMe several times a week to sort this out.

& # 39; They've tried to find out if she has her own bank account so the money can go there – the last time they heard she didn't – but there are other factors. & # 39;

Asked if her girlfriend would live a normal life again, Paulina said: & I sincerely hope she will be lucky to get out of this situation.

& # 39; I know she will work hard if she gets a chance and a starting point.

& # 39; I think she needs a house, an instrument and the rest will be fine. & # 39;

Paulina explained that the only money that Emily received came from a performance at an Italian festival in the center of San Pedro in early October (photo). Paulina said that Emily finds it difficult to accept charity and never wanted to depend on anyone
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Paulina explained that the only money that Emily received came from a performance at an Italian festival in the center of San Pedro in early October (photo). Paulina said that Emily finds it difficult to accept charity and never wanted to depend on anyone

Paulina explained that the only money that Emily received came from a performance at an Italian festival in the center of San Pedro in early October (photo). Paulina said that Emily finds it difficult to accept charity and never wanted to depend on anyone

Soviet youth: Emily was born and raised in communism. Her biological parents and her adoptive parents were Seventh-day Adventists and practiced despite KGB and police burglary. But in her teenage years she has endured a love trail between her birth and adoptive families

Soviet youth: Emily was born and raised in communism. Her biological parents and her adoptive parents were Seventh-day Adventists and practiced despite KGB and police burglary. But in her teenage years she has endured a love trail between her birth and adoptive families

Soviet youth: Emily was born and raised in communism. Her biological parents and her adoptive parents were Seventh-day Adventists and practiced despite KGB and police burglary. But in her teenage years she has endured a love trail between her birth and adoptive families

Friends: Emily (circled) as a student at the Music and Music Pedagogy Faculty in Balti. Her good friend Paulina told DailyMailTV that she was exceptionally talented and fully committed to her music

Friends: Emily (circled) as a student at the Music and Music Pedagogy Faculty in Balti. Her good friend Paulina told DailyMailTV that she was exceptionally talented and fully committed to her music

Friends: Emily (circled) as a student at the Music and Music Pedagogy Faculty in Balti. Her good friend Paulina told DailyMailTV that she was exceptionally talented and fully committed to her music

Paulina also revealed that Emily's large family had found her after she was stressed that she lived on the street and sang for money from passing commuters.

& # 39; She told me that after she was discovered, she had met her relatives and her mother died just two days after seeing her, & # 39; said Paulina. & # 39; Her mother was very old. & # 39;

Paulina had previously feared that Emily was dead after she stopped communicating years ago.

Paulina said: & # 39; She hasn't changed. She is very modest. She didn't keep in touch with me because she didn't have enough money.

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& # 39; She said her family members helped her, but she didn't like this.

& # 39; She decided to disappear so that she would not drag anyone else into her situation and cause financial problems for them.

& # 39; She told me how she played the violin on the street. She started playing classical music, but people didn't pay for it.

& # 39; So she then had to play other types of music that people would pay more generously for. & # 39;

Paulina continued: & # 39; She said it was not easy on the street. There were people who were jealous of her because she deserved more.

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& # 39; There was competition. Even though she used the money she earned only for her personal needs. She had no other sources of income. & # 39;

Emily was finally & # 39; happy & # 39; that she was discovered & # 39; but also embarrassed and went so far as to & # 39; to ask the police officer not to post the video so that she would have no problems. & # 39;

Beloved daughter: Ivan and Ioana Zamorca brought Emily - then Liudmila - at the age of two and a half. Ioana, now a widower but then a collective farm worker, wept when she told DailyMailTV of her love for the & # 39; subway soprano & # 39; and her wonderful musical ability

Beloved daughter: Ivan and Ioana Zamorca brought Emily - then Liudmila - at the age of two and a half. Ioana, now a widower but then a collective farm worker, wept when she told DailyMailTV of her love for the & # 39; subway soprano & # 39; and her wonderful musical ability

Beloved daughter: Ivan and Ioana Zamorca brought Emily – then Liudmila – at the age of two and a half. Ioana, now a widower but then a collective farm worker, wept when she told DailyMailTV of her love for the & # 39; subway soprano & # 39; and her wonderful musical ability

Paulina said that Emily should be helped to return to Moldova, to be reunited with Ioana (photo), who raised her until she was a teenager

Paulina said that Emily should be helped to return to Moldova, to be reunited with Ioana (photo), who raised her until she was a teenager

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Paulina said that Emily should be helped to return to Moldova, to be reunited with Ioana (photo), who raised her until she was a teenager

Soviet youth: how Emily Zamourka & # 39; s childhood and teens spanned into what are now two different countries, with a love affair between her adoptive and birth families after she discovered when she was 12 that she was adopted

Soviet youth: how Emily Zamourka & # 39; s childhood and teens spanned into what are now two different countries, with a love affair between her adoptive and birth families after she discovered when she was 12 that she was adopted

Soviet youth: how Emily Zamourka & # 39; s childhood and teens spanned into what are now two different countries, with a love affair between her adoptive and birth families after she discovered when she was 12 that she was adopted

Paulina said: & # 39; The police officer had told her that he only recorded for himself because he liked the way she sang.

& # 39; After this incident, people began to greet her on the street and tell her how beautiful she sang.

& # 39; She then understood that the policeman had posted the video. & # 39;

DailyMail.com was born as Liudmila Grekova in Basarabeasca in what is now Moldova but when the Soviet Union was. Daily, Daily revealed how Emily had endured a difficult childhood in Soviet Russia and a sour American dream.

She is the youngest of nine brothers and sisters born in 1967 and her family were Seventh-day Adventists – a religion forbidden by the Communists – who remained pious worshipers despite the intrusive attention of the KGB and the police.

But it was when she was only two and a half years old that her life changed fundamentally, with her mother having to give her up for adoption because of heart problems.

She was passed on to a childless Seventh-day Adventist couple, Ivan and Ioana Zamorca, 85, in another city, Leova.

Paulina said that Emily should be helped to return to Moldova, to be reunited with Ioana, who raised her until she was a teenager.

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