Suburban DC parents denounce abuse they received after speaking out against critical race theory

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TV cameras captured the moment a parent in Washington DC was cheated by a neighbor as she explained how friends and family had turned against her for speaking out against teaching critical race theory in their children’s schools.

Jessica Mendez, a mother of two in the Loudoun County Public School system, says she was labeled a racist after trying to block controversial classes.

“My own family had openly criticized me and asked me, you know, what’s wrong with me? You know, why didn’t I understand? , the interviewer told before Fox news.

But during the interview, a neighbor walks by in the background and raises two middle fingers at Mendez and the camera.

“I thought I had a good friend,” Mendez added.

“I’m really hurt now because I thought we were on a relationship, that I could be conservative, and they could be liberal, and we could still be friends. I think I was wrong.’

Loudoun County, where the average home sells for $575,600, has been divided amid the nation’s recent equity initiative to teach students about critical race theory.

Mother of two Loudoun County Public School students Jessica Mendez says she has fought with her own family over the issue of critical race theory in the classroom

During the interview, a neighbor walks by in the background and raises two middle fingers at Mendez and the camera.

During the interview, a neighbor walks by in the background and raises two middle fingers at Mendez and the camera.

When a group of parents stepped up to avoid teaching the theory to their children, they received intense reactions from peers, including some who launched a Facebook group called Anti-Racist Parents of Loudoun County.

In interviews released Thursday, several of the so-called “anti-CRT” parents revealed how their friends, neighbors and families turned against them for speaking out.

Patti Hidalgo Menders, Loudoun County parent and president of the Loudoun County Republican Women’s Club, said, “They put three pictures of me there and they called me a racist.

“They had my first and last name, my husband’s name, where my son goes to high school, what city I live in, and they called me disgusting.”

Patti Hidalgo Menders, a Loudoun County parent and president of the Loudoun County Republican Women's Club

Patti Hidalgo Menders, a Loudoun County parent and president of the Loudoun County Republican Women’s Club

Critical race theory is a school of thought that examines power structures and racial dynamics among minorities, with proponents of the concept claiming it creates a better understanding of diversity and different cultural backgrounds in those who study it.

Opponents of the critical race theory have argued that it reduces people to categories of “privileged” or “oppressed” based on their skin color.

With diversity sensitivity training and evolving academic curricula recently gaining the nation’s attention, the concept of CRT has become a powder keg of a theory for critics and proponents alike.

The debate over CRT in Loudoun County appears to reflect diverse ethnic makeup, according to a DataUSA report, with 55.1 percent White/non-Hispanic, 19 percent Asian, 8 percent White/Hispanic, and 6.88 percent African American.

A Facebook group titled 'Anti-Racist Parents of Loudoun County' has shamed anti-CRT parents online, CRT opponents say

A Facebook group titled ‘Anti-Racist Parents of Loudoun County’ has shamed anti-CRT parents online, CRT opponents say

IT engineer and Kenyan immigrant Fred Rege lives in Loudoun County, where his two daughters are enrolled in the county’s public school system. Rege said he knows dozens of parents who, like him, agree that schools should teach critical race theory in the classroom.

However, none of those pro-CRT parents speak for fear of retaliation, Rege said.

Kenyan immigrant Fred Rege is an advocate for teaching critical race theory in classrooms in Loudoun County.

Kenyan immigrant Fred Rege is an advocate for teaching critical race theory in classrooms in Loudoun County. “My main responsibility is my children,” he said

“Finally I got to the point where I said, ‘My main responsibility is my children,’ Rege says.

“Even if it costs me certain things in society and canceling this and canceling that, you know, I have my dignity. I will have the, you know, integrity of my children, and their self-confidence, their belief in themselves intact. And it’s worth it.’

As for the pro-CRT Facebook group, Menders says their intimidation tactics have backfired on encouraging the opposition.

“They were trying to intimidate us by using social media,” Menders added. “But I’ll be honest, I feel like it fueled my passion for this even more.”

CRITICAL RACE THEORY: WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

The battle over critical race theory in schools has escalated in the United States over the past year.

The theory has sparked fierce national debate in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests across the country over the past year and the introduction of the 1619 project.

Published in 2019 by the New York Times to mark 400 years since the first enslaved Africans arrived on American shores, the 1619 Project reframes American history through “the impact of slavery and the contributions of black Americans to the center of the US. story’.

The debate surrounding critical race theory concerns concerns that some children are being indoctrinated into thinking that white people are inherently racist or sexist.

Opponents of the critical race theory have argued that it reduces people to categories of “privileged” or “oppressed” based on their skin color.

Supporters, however, say the theory is vital to eliminating racism as it examines the ways in which race affects American politics, culture and the law.

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