Home Health Subtle change in your hands that could mean you have high cholesterol and risk of a heart attack

Subtle change in your hands that could mean you have high cholesterol and risk of a heart attack

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Cholesterol is a fatty substance that can build up and damage the blood vessels that supply the heart. It is found in animal products, such as meat and egg yolks.
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Determining if your cholesterol is dangerously high can be as simple as looking in the mirror.

Doctors say that specific types of lumps near the eyes and swelling in the hands and legs may indicate that cholesterol has reached levels that increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.

About 71 million Americans suffer from high cholesterol, when a fatty substance builds up in blood vessels, damaging them and restricting blood flow to and from the heart.

Studies estimate that about 40 percent of people with this life-threatening disease, which is diagnosed through blood tests, do not know they have it, so they do not receive treatment.

Cholesterol is a fatty substance that can build up and damage the blood vessels that supply the heart. It is found in animal products, such as meat and egg yolks.

Saturated fats in the diet, as well as obesity, stimulate cholesterol production in the liver. Typically, the higher the level of cholesterol in the blood, the greater the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

It is believed that millions of heart attacks and strokes could be prevented each year if people with high cholesterol were detected and treated with medication.

Experts say there are telltale signs that are easy to spot and that few people know about.

Lumps around the eyes, usually tinged yellow due to the color of fat under the skin, are a hallmark sign of high cholesterol, as are lumps and swelling on the hands.

These bumps on the face are called xanthelasma and are generally not painful. However, they could indicate that fat is flowing through the bloodstream.

Yellowish bumps on the hands, yellow due to the color of fat deposits, are a hallmark sign that a person has high cholesterol. Yellow bumps around the eyes are usually not painful, but they may indicate that fats are building up in the bloodstream.

Yellowish bumps on the hands, yellow due to the color of fat deposits, are a hallmark sign that a person has high cholesterol. Yellow bumps around the eyes are usually not painful, but they may indicate that fats are building up in the bloodstream.

Another sign on the face is a thin blue, white or gray circle around the colored part of the eye, the iris. The circle becomes increasingly noticeable with age and is seen more frequently in men.

The third most common sign of fat buildup in the blood is called retinal vein occlusion, which causes bulging eyes. It usually occurs when clumps of fat in the blood vessels break and block the vein that supplies blood to the retina, causing fat to leak.

The signs are equally noticeable on the hands. Swelling around the knuckles is common, causing tendon pain. It can occur around any tendon, including the heel.

High cholesterol can also cause tingling in the hands and legs due to limited blood flow to those areas. However, it does not cause numbness. So if you can’t feel your fingers, you’re probably safe.

Cholesterol is produced in the liver and supports crucial body processes, including strengthening protective membranes around cells, hormone production, and food digestion.

Pale nails are another sign to look out for, as they indicate that oxygenated blood flow is impeded to the hands.

Tingling in the legs could indicate peripheral artery disease, characterized by a narrowing of the peripheral arteries that carry blood from the heart to other parts of the body.

PAD also increases the risk of ulcers, sores that develop on the skin or mucous membranes of the body, such as the mouth. It also affects blood flow to the kidneys and stomach.

Doctors recently warned that about 65 million Americans could be at risk of developing a fatal stroke or heart attack in midlife due to a specific cholesterol protein called lipoprotein a.

It is known to be more harmful than other types of LDL, as it is made from “sticky” proteins that allow it to quickly form clumps, interfering with healthy blood flow.

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