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Stunning space images are captured by an amateur astronomer from his back garden in Essex

Stunning images of the Moon and the Milky Way have been captured by an amateur astronomer from his backyard in Southend-on-Sea, in Essex.

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours of the night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot.

Among its themes are the Running Man, Rosette and Orion nebulae, as well as the Sun and the Andromeda galaxy, which is about 2.5 million light years from Earth.

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Stunning images of the Moon and the Milky Way have been captured by an amateur astronomer from his backyard in Southend-on-Sea, in Essex. In the photo, one of the photos of a distant nebula of Mr. Glawdzin using his single-lens digital camera

Stunning images of the Moon and the Milky Way have been captured by an amateur astronomer from his backyard in Southend-on-Sea, in Essex. In the photo, one of the photos of a distant nebula of Mr. Glawdzin using his single-lens digital camera

In a dazzling sequence that Mr. Glawdzin took, you can see the moon rising over the Earth's horizon from the ruins of Hadleigh Castle, which dominates Canvey Island and the Thames estuary. To get that image, Dawid captured a series of images for three hours that he then combined to show the moon rising in the night sky.

In a dazzling sequence that Mr. Glawdzin took, you can see the moon rising over the Earth's horizon from the ruins of Hadleigh Castle, which dominates Canvey Island and the Thames estuary. To get that image, Dawid captured a series of images for three hours that he then combined to show the moon rising in the night sky.

In a dazzling sequence that Mr. Glawdzin took, you can see the moon rising over the Earth’s horizon from the ruins of Hadleigh Castle, which dominates Canvey Island and the Thames estuary. To get that image, Dawid captured a series of images for three hours that he then combined to show the moon rising in the night sky.

One of Mr. Glawdzin's specialties is to capture the Moon with amazing details. To avoid light pollution, the 37-year-old man often walks through the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the photo, the Moon seen from Essex in January 2020

One of Mr. Glawdzin's specialties is to capture the Moon with amazing details. To avoid light pollution, the 37-year-old man often walks through the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the photo, the Moon seen from Essex in January 2020

One of Mr. Glawdzin’s specialties is to capture the Moon with amazing details. To avoid light pollution, the 37-year-old man often walks through the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the photo, the Moon seen from Essex in January 2020

One of Mr. Glawdzin’s specialties is to capture the Moon with amazing details.

To avoid light pollution, the dedicated fan often walks away in the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot.

In a dazzling sequence he took, the moon can be seen rising above the Earth’s horizon from the ruins of Hadleigh Castle, which dominates Canvey Island and the Thames Estuary.

To get that image, Dawid captured a series of images for three hours that he then combined to show the moon rising in the night sky.

Other shots in his wallet show the sunrise over St. Peter’s Chapel on the wall in Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, one of the oldest intact Christian churches in the country.

Glawdzin, who is married to Monika, 42, and works for an insurance company, said his son Oscar, seven, loved to help him with his camera.

But he added that his night photography “was often done at quite anti-social hours.”

“Light can be a problem, so I will go out to the field to get the perfect shot.”

However, most things are taken in my back garden, in Southend.

Among its themes are the Running Man, Rosette and Orion nebulae, as well as the Sun and the Andromeda galaxy that is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, shown here as seen from Mr's back garden Glawdzin in Essex

Among its themes are the Running Man, Rosette and Orion nebulae, as well as the Sun and the Andromeda galaxy that is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, shown here as seen from Mr's back garden Glawdzin in Essex

Among its themes are the Running Man, Rosette and Orion nebulae, as well as the Sun and the Andromeda galaxy that is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, shown here as seen from Mr’s back garden Glawdzin in Essex

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours around Essex at night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot. In the image, this composite image shows the total eclipse of a blood wolf super moon over Southend-on-Sea in January 2019

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours around Essex at night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot. In the image, this composite image shows the total eclipse of a blood wolf super moon over Southend-on-Sea in January 2019

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours around Essex at night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot. In the image, this composite image shows the total eclipse of a blood wolf super moon over Southend-on-Sea in January 2019

Dawid Glawdzin, 37 (pictured), often spends hours of the night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot.

Dawid Glawdzin, 37 (pictured), often spends hours of the night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera to get the perfect shot.

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours of the night in the freezing cold with his single-lens DSLR camera (pictured, right, on a tracking mount) to get the perfect photo.

Dawid Glawdzin, 37, often spends hours of the night in the freezing cold with his single-lens DSLR camera (pictured, right, on a tracking mount) to get the perfect photo.

Dawid Glawdzin, 37 (left), often spends hours of night in the freezing cold using his single-lens DSLR camera (pictured, on the right, in a tracking mount) to get the perfect shot.

Glawdzin said his night photography “was often taken at quite antisocial hours.” He added that ‘light can be a problem, so I will go out to the field to get the perfect shot

Other shots in his wallet show the sunrise over St. Peter's Chapel on the wall in Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, one of the oldest intact Christian churches in the country.

Other shots in his wallet show the sunrise over St. Peter's Chapel on the wall in Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, one of the oldest intact Christian churches in the country.

Other shots in his wallet show the sunrise over St. Peter’s Chapel on the wall in Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex, one of the oldest intact Christian churches in the country.

Among the themes of Mr. Glawdzin are the Rosette and Orion Nebulae, as well as the Sun (pictured), the Moon and the Andromeda Galaxy that is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, which show here how it looks from your back garden in Essex

Among the themes of Mr. Glawdzin are the Rosette and Orion Nebulae, as well as the Sun (pictured), the Moon and the Andromeda Galaxy that is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, which show here how it looks from your back garden in Essex

Among the themes of Mr. Glawdzin are the Rosette and Orion Nebulae, as well as the Sun, the Moon (pictured) and the Andromeda Galaxy which is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, which show here how it looks from your back garden in Essex

Among the themes of Mr. Glawdzin are the Rosette and Orion Nebulae, as well as the Sun, the Moon (pictured) and the Andromeda Galaxy which is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, which show here how it looks from your back garden in Essex

Among the subjects of Mr. Glawdzin are the Rosette and Orion nebulae, as well as the Sun (left), the Moon (right) and the Andromeda Galaxy, which is about 2.5 million light years from Earth, shown here as seen from his back garden in Essex

To avoid light pollution, the dedicated fan often walks away in the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the picture, the Rosette nebula seen from Mr. Glawdzin's back garden in Southend-on-Sea

To avoid light pollution, the dedicated fan often walks away in the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the picture, the Rosette nebula seen from Mr. Glawdzin's back garden in Southend-on-Sea

To avoid light pollution, the dedicated fan often walks away in the Essex countryside to ensure the perfect shot. In the picture, the Rosette nebula seen from Mr. Glawdzin’s back garden in Southend-on-Sea

Glawdzin (left), who is married to Monika, 42 (bottom right) and works for an insurance company, said his son Oscar, seven years old (top right) loved to help him with his camera .

Glawdzin (left), who is married to Monika, 42 (bottom right) and works for an insurance company, said his son Oscar, seven years old (top right) loved to help him with his camera .

Glawdzin (left), who is married to Monika, 42 (bottom right) and works for an insurance company, said his son Oscar, seven years old (top right) loved to help him with his camera .

What is light pollution?

Light pollution, also known as photopolution, is the presence of anthropogenic light in the night environment.

Artificial light that is excessive, annoying and, ultimately, wasteful is called light pollution, and directly influences the brightness of our night skies.

With more than nine million street lamps and 27 million offices, factories, warehouses and homes in the United Kingdom, the amount of light we project to the sky is huge.

While some of the light escapes into space, the rest is dispersed by molecules in the atmosphere, making it difficult to see the stars against the night sky. What you see instead is “Skyglow”.

The increasing number of people living on earth and the corresponding increase in inappropriate and unshielded outdoor lighting has resulted in light pollution, a bright night sky that has erased the stars for much of the world’s population.

Most people must travel far from home, away from the brightness of artificial lighting, to experience the impressive extension of the Milky Way as our ancestors knew it.

Light pollution is excessive and inappropriate artificial light. While some of the light escapes into space, the rest is dispersed by molecules in the atmosphere, making it difficult to see the stars against the night sky. What you see instead is “Skyglow”

The negative effects of the loss of this inspiring natural resource may seem intangible.

But more and more evidence links the bright night sky directly with measurable negative impacts on human health and immune function, in adverse behavioral changes in insect and animal populations, and in a decrease in both environmental quality and safety. In our night environment.

Astronomers were among the first to record the negative impacts of wasted lighting on scientific research, but for all of us, the adverse economic and environmental impacts of wasted energy are evident in everything from the monthly electric bill to global warming.

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