Students who graduate with the coveted STEM degrees have a worse chance of getting the right job

STEM graduates, including graduates in math and science, have some of the worst post-graduate employment rates: 10% less than the average.

Students who graduate with some of the most coveted titles will have the WORST chance to get the right job because they lack practical skills.

  • The director of a university said that a STEM degree is not necessarily the passport for a job
  • The director of the Group of Eight, Vicki Thomson, said that many graduates lack practical experience
  • The new figures show that STEM graduates are landing jobs 10 percent less than the average
  • Ms. Thomson has already called for greater recognition of professional training

Charlie Coe for Daily Mail Australia

Once proclaimed as passports to a safe and well-paid career, science, technology and mathematics degrees now have some of the lowest employment rates in Australia, according to a university director.

The warning for STEM graduates (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) came from Vicki Thomson, executive director of the Group of Eight Association of Universities.

Ms. Thomson's words are supported by industry leaders who say that too many graduates ignore the job market or have no practical experience.

STEM graduates, including graduates in math and science, have some of the worst post-graduate employment rates: 10% less than the average.

STEM graduates, including graduates in math and science, have some of the worst post-graduate employment rates: 10% less than the average.

About 20 percent of the nearly two million Australian national students who graduated between 2007 and 2016 belonged to STEM disciplines, according to the Daily Telegraph.

But graduates in math and science are finding jobs at a rate 10 percent lower than the average post-graduation, according to the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI),

The executive director of Go8 has also called for greater recognition of vocational education.

The director of the Group of Eight, Vicki Thomson, has called for greater recognition of non-university training courses and has warned STEM graduates that their degree is not a passport for a given career.

In a speech to the Forum of Partnerships for Industry and Employment Outcomes Graduated in Sydney, Ms. Thompson said Australia would be a "poorer nation" if it did not give the entire tertiary system the value it deserves.

She said: "We could not live healthily, safely or successfully without plumbers, electricians, fire safety inspectors, all of which is offered through VET."

According to a recent report, ninety-two percent of graduates in trade courses found work immediately.

Pearson's educational advisors published an article last year asking for more government investment in STEAM, with the & # 39; A & # 39; A & # 39; added referring to art.

Meanwhile, Chamber of Commerce CEO Stephen Cartwright said that even highly qualified candidates for STEM titles were struggling to get hired.

He said: "No qualification by itself these days is a passport for a job."

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