Students got disciplined after creating a ‘Slave Trade’ and ‘N *** a Auction’ on Snapchat

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Outrage when Texas students hold ‘N ***** Auction’ on social media and ‘sell one black classmate for $ 100 and another for just $ 1 because they didn’t like his hair’

  • Students at the Daniel Ninth Grade Campus, part of the Aledo Independent School District, communicated with each other in a chat they created on Snapchat
  • The ninth graders played a ‘game’ in which they scored prizes for the black classmates and ‘exchanged’ them with each other
  • One student was considered to be worth $ 100 while another was valued at just $ 1 because his peers didn’t like his hair
  • District officials said they learned of the incident more than two weeks ago and are punishing the students
  • They did not want to specify what the discipline was
  • Parents and community members were annoyed that the incident was described as mere ‘cyberbullying’

Ninth grade students at a Texas high school were punished for “ slave trading ” their black classmates in a group chat called Slave Trade, N *** a Farm, and N *** a Auction.

Students at the Daniel Ninth Grade Campus, part of the Aledo Independent School District, communicated with each other through a chat they created on Snapchat.

The ninth graders played a ‘game’ in which they scored prizes for the black classmates and ‘exchanged’ them with each other, NBC DFW reports.

One student was considered to be worth $ 100, while another was valued as low as $ 1 because his peers didn’t like his hair.

Students at the Daniel Ninth Grade Campus, part of the Aledo Independent School District, communicated with each other in a chat they created on Snapchat

Students at the Daniel Ninth Grade Campus, part of the Aledo Independent School District, communicated with each other in a chat they created on Snapchat

In the chat, the ninth graders played a 'game' in which they listed prizes for the black classmates and 'exchanged' them with each other (stock image)

In the chat, the ninth graders played a 'game' in which they listed prizes for the black classmates and 'exchanged' them with each other (stock image)

In the chat, the ninth graders played a ‘game’ in which they listed prizes for the black classmates and ‘exchanged’ them with each other (stock image)

According to a statement by Superintendent Dr. Susan Bohn, the district learned of the incident more than two weeks ago. They said the students participating in the ‘auction’ were cyberbullying and harassing the students. The Aledo Independent School District would not specify what the disciplined meant for the students, the Fort Worth Star Telegram

“There is no room for racism or hatred in the Aledo ISD, period,” Bohn said in the statement. “The use of inappropriate, offensive and racially charged language and behavior is completely unacceptable and prohibited by district policy.”

The Chief Inspector later added, “This incident has caused tremendous pain for the victims, their families and other colored students and their families, and we are deeply saddened for that.”

In a letter to students on April 5, Principal Carolyn Ansley said the incident “sparked conversations about how inappropriate and hurtful language can have a profound and lasting impact on the students and classmates involved.”

Parents and community activists called the incident the norm for the neighborhood, enraged at the handling by administrators.

“I call it cyberbullying instead of racism … that’s the part that really gets under my skin,” said Mark Grubbs, a father of three former Aledo ISD students. The father’s children were doing so badly that he pulled them out of the ward.

In a letter to students on April 5, Principal Carolyn Ansley said the incident `` sparked conversations about how inappropriate and offensive language use can have a profound and lasting impact on the students and classmates involved.

In a letter to students on April 5, Principal Carolyn Ansley said the incident `` sparked conversations about how inappropriate and offensive language use can have a profound and lasting impact on the students and classmates involved.

In a letter to students on April 5, Principal Carolyn Ansley said the incident “ sparked conversations about how inappropriate and offensive language use can have a profound and lasting impact on the students and classmates involved.

‘Lots of racism. My son was called on his behalf and what not, and it got to the point where he didn’t mind fighting and that didn’t sit well with me and my wife, ”Grubbs said. “My son was never a fighter.”

Tony Crawford, an activist and leader of Parker County Progressives, described the incident as “one of many incidents to be swept under the rug.”

Can you imagine what it’s like when someone puts a price on your head? I can’t imagine how embarrassing and hurting people you might be friends with have that conversation, ”Crawford said of the troubled students.

Parker County NAACP president Eddie Burnett said he heard about the incident on Sunday. He, along with other members of the community, plans to attend the Aledo school board meeting on April 19.

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