Strike action in Birmingham leaves trash behind at Christmas high piled up in the streets

Bins run over and litter rumbles in the streets of Birmingham, after more waste collectors have voted to take industrial action alongside their binmen colleagues, leaving waste from Christmas piled up on urban sidewalks.

Approximately 30 Unison union members will join the strike after voting unanimously to support their Unite Union colleagues who, weeks ago, filed tools in a dispute over legal payments.

Photographs made in the city show the rubbish that remains after the holidays to pollute the residential area after trade union and city councilors could not break the deadlock, as some residents claim they had not had a collection for seven weeks.

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Dirty stench: bins run over and litter rumbles in the streets of Birmingham, after more waste collectors have voted to take industrial action alongside their binmen colleagues, leaving trash left over from Christmas, stacked high on sidewalks. Torn garbage bags attract rats, cats and foxes, while trade union workers refuse to throw away waste and leave bad smells

Dirty stench: bins run over and litter rumbles in the streets of Birmingham, after more waste collectors have voted to take industrial action alongside their binmen colleagues, leaving trash left over from Christmas, stacked high on sidewalks. Torn garbage bags attract rats, cats and foxes, while trade union workers refuse to throw away waste and leave bad smells

Christmas garbage: about 30 Unison union members will begin a work to ban domination and overtime after being unanimously voted to show solidarity with their Unite colleagues who, weeks ago, had deleted tools in a dispute over legal payments . Turnstones are in the streets and the dustbins are filled to the brim, leading to a wall of waste on sidewalks

Christmas garbage: about 30 Unison union members will begin a work to ban domination and overtime after being unanimously voted to show solidarity with their Unite colleagues who, weeks ago, had deleted tools in a dispute over legal payments . Turnstones are in the streets and the dustbins are filled to the brim, leading to a wall of waste on sidewalks

Christmas garbage: about 30 Unison union members will begin a work to ban domination and overtime after being unanimously voted to show solidarity with their Unite colleagues who, weeks ago, had deleted tools in a dispute over legal payments . Turnstones are in the streets and the dustbins are filled to the brim, leading to a wall of waste on sidewalks

Photographs taken in the city show the garbage that remains after the festive season to pollute the residential area after trade union and city councilors could not break the deadlock, as the locals claim they have not had a collection for seven weeks.

Photographs taken in the city show the garbage that remains after the festive season to pollute the residential area after trade union and city councilors could not break the deadlock, as the locals claim they have not had a collection for seven weeks.

Photographs taken in the city show the garbage that remains after the festive season to pollute the residential area after trade union and city councilors could not break the deadlock, as the locals claim they have not had a collection for seven weeks.

Baking bags and garbage pile up outside of houses on Cotterills Lane in Alum Rock, Birmingham

Baking bags and garbage pile up outside of houses on Cotterills Lane in Alum Rock, Birmingham

Baking bags and garbage pile up outside of houses on Cotterills Lane in Alum Rock, Birmingham

Members of the Unite Union, who together make up more than 300 employees of the city, demand similarities with the much smaller group of GMB affiliated waste workers about a payment made to them to resolve a legal dispute.

Last did not cancel talks to avert the dispute between members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented.

Now members of the smaller trade union have come out solitary with Unite, where the city has landed in a greater chaos with residents who suggest that rats and foxes have been drawn to the area for a simple meal.

Last did not cancel talks to avert the dispute between members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented. Now members of the smaller union in a solitary group with Unite have come out and the city has been thrown into a greater chaos with rats, similar to those pictured here, drawn to the area for an easy meal

Last did not cancel talks to avert the dispute between members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented. Now members of the smaller union in a solitary group with Unite have come out and the city has been thrown into a greater chaos with rats, similar to those pictured here, drawn to the area for an easy meal

Last did not cancel talks to avert the dispute between members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented. Now members of the smaller union in a solitary group with Unite have come out and the city has been thrown into a greater chaos with rats, similar to those pictured here, drawn to the area for an easy meal

Members of the Unite Union, who together make up more than 300 employees of the city, demand a lot of resemblance with the much smaller group of GMB affiliated waste workers about a payment to them to resolve a legal dispute.

Members of the Unite Union, who together make up more than 300 employees of the city, demand a lot of resemblance with the much smaller group of GMB affiliated waste workers about a payment to them to resolve a legal dispute.

Members of the Unite Union, who together make up more than 300 employees of the city, demand a lot of resemblance with the much smaller group of GMB affiliated waste workers about a payment to them to resolve a legal dispute.

Last did not cancel talks to prevent the dispute between the members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented

Last did not cancel talks to prevent the dispute between the members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented

Last did not cancel talks to prevent the dispute between the members of Unite and Birmingham City Council on December 29, so a series of disruptive measures were implemented

When the strike began last year, resident Lisa Cartwright, who lives in the Moseley area of ​​the city, said she had not had her garbage collection in her apartment of twelve flats for seven weeks.

She said: & # 39; Our collections have never become normal since the strike action. Our bins have not been emptied for at least seven weeks.

& # 39; For some strange reason, garbage is collected on the other side of the road, which spoils the faith. & # 39;

Now members of the smaller Union have come out solitary with Unite, causing the city to end up in a greater chaos

Now members of the smaller Union have come out solitary with Unite, causing the city to end up in a greater chaos

Now members of the smaller Union have come out solitary with Unite, causing the city to end up in a greater chaos

When the strike began last year, resident Lisa Cartwright, who lives in the Moseley area of ​​the city, said she had not had her garbage collection in her apartment of twelve flats for seven weeks. She said: & # 39; Our collections have never become normal since the strike action. Our bins have not been emptied for at least seven weeks

When the strike began last year, resident Lisa Cartwright, who lives in the Moseley area of ​​the city, said she had not had her garbage collection in her apartment of twelve flats for seven weeks. She said: & # 39; Our collections have never become normal since the strike action. Our bins have not been emptied for at least seven weeks

When the strike began last year, resident Lisa Cartwright, who lives in the Moseley area of ​​the city, said she had not had her garbage collection in her apartment of twelve flats for seven weeks. She said: & # 39; Our collections have never become normal since the strike action. Our bins have not been emptied for at least seven weeks

Birmingham braces itself for more colorful chaos after employees have voted to take industrial action - leaving the prospect of even more waste accumulating in the city

Birmingham braces itself for more colorful chaos after employees have voted to take industrial action - leaving the prospect of even more waste accumulating in the city

Birmingham braces itself for more colorful chaos after employees have voted to take industrial action – leaving the prospect of even more waste accumulating in the city

Strike action among binmen in the city is not new. In September 2017, bin workers finally suspend the strike actions that had taken place due to a dispute with the city council about job losses

Strike action among binmen in the city is not new. In September 2017, bin workers finally suspend the strike actions that had taken place due to a dispute with the city council about job losses

Strike action among binmen in the city is not new. In September 2017, bin workers finally suspend the strike actions that had taken place due to a dispute with the city council about job losses

A spokeswoman for Birmingham City Council said at the time: "We are looking for reports of missed collections from this particular address, but we will make sure that a collection is made as quickly as possible.

& # 39; After the switch to new routes and five-day work activities, our crews continue to build up local knowledge to ensure the most efficient routes are used – but there are still some problems and we are trying to solve any open problems.

& # 39; Please accept our apologies if your bins are missed. & # 39;

Strike action among binmen in the city is not new. In September 2017, bin workers finally suspend the strike actions that had taken place due to a dispute with the city council about job losses.

Fly tippers leave British streets a disgusting mess because crackdowns entail new fines

Shocking photos reveal the horrible state of British streets thanks to fly-tippers who illegally dump waste, which would cost the tax millions.

Photos from the UK show the growing stacks of waste, from defective white goods, old electronic equipment, contaminated mattresses and industrial waste, all dumped by fly tippers who apparently did not bother to take it off in a responsible manner .

Local authorities spent more than £ 57 million a year cleaning up rubbish left behind by perpetrators, and the government is trying to help them with new fines to fly.

Shocking photos show the horrific state of the streets of Britain thanks to fly-tippers who illegally dump waste, making the tax pay.

Shocking photos show the horrific state of the streets of Britain thanks to fly-tippers who illegally dump waste, making the tax pay.

Shocking photos show the horrific state of the streets of Britain thanks to fly-tippers who illegally dump waste, making the tax pay.

Images from the UK show the growing amounts of waste, from defective white goods, old electronic equipment, contaminated mattresses and industrial waste, all dumped by fly tippers who apparently did not bother to take it off in a responsible manner

Images from the UK show the growing amounts of waste, from defective white goods, old electronic equipment, contaminated mattresses and industrial waste, all dumped by fly tippers who apparently did not bother to take it off in a responsible manner

Images from the UK show the growing amounts of waste, from defective white goods, old electronic equipment, contaminated mattresses and industrial waste, all dumped by fly tippers who apparently did not bother to take it off in a responsible manner

Local authorities spent more than £ 57 million a year to clean up clutter left by perpetrators, and the government is trying to help them with new fines to fly

Local authorities spent more than £ 57 million a year to clean up clutter left by perpetrators, and the government is trying to help them with new fines to fly

Local authorities spent more than £ 57 million a year to clean up clutter left by perpetrators, and the government is trying to help them with new fines to fly

Coventry residents are now faced with hitting £ 400 fines as their waste is find fly-tip – even if they do not dump it.

From Monday 7 January, new government legislation came into force giving the councils additional powers to deal with the fall.

It means that households now have a legal & # 39; duty of care & # 39; have to ensure that they only deliver their waste to an authorized carrier.

Any householder who does not pass on his waste to a licensed carrier, and whose waste is tipped-fly, can now receive penalties of up to £ 400.

The new fines on the spot will make it easier for municipalities to tackle the fall of flies and offer an alternative to the previous method of bringing cases to court, which can be a lengthy and costly process.

From Monday 7 January, new government legislation came into force giving the councils additional powers to deal with the fall. It means that households now have a legal & # 39; duty of care & # 39; have to ensure that they only deliver their waste to an authorized carrier

From Monday 7 January, new government legislation came into force giving the councils additional powers to deal with the fall. It means that households now have a legal & # 39; duty of care & # 39; have to ensure that they only deliver their waste to an authorized carrier

Any householder who does not hand over his waste to a licensed carrier and whose waste is tipped can now be punished up to a maximum of £ 400. The new penalties on the spot will make it easier for municipalities to accept the overturning of flies. tackle and offer an alternative to the previous method to get cases through the court, which can be a lengthy and costly process

Craig Hickin, head of environmental services at the Coventry City Council, said: "We are very interested in the new powers and see how they can be used to help us tackle the problem of falling over.

& # 39; So far, we have only had powers with which we can account for companies by showing them how they legally dispose of their waste. Now these new forces ensure that it applies to everyone.

& # 39; People now have a & # 39; duty of care & # 39; to ensure that waste is disposed of properly and in accordance with the law.

& # 39; Like companies, when their garbage ends up being false, they have to prove to us that they have used authorized waste companies.

Councils have been informed by the government about how they can use their new powers proportionately, meaning that clear sanctions should not be used to raise money and should not be spent on minor infringements.

Councils have been informed by the government about how they can use their new powers proportionately, meaning that clear sanctions should not be used to raise money and should not be spent on minor infringements.

Councils have been informed by the government about how they can use their new powers proportionately, meaning that clear sanctions should not be used to raise money and should not be spent on minor infringements.

& # 39; If they can not do this to our satisfaction, they will receive a fixed fine or prosecution for not exercising this duty of care.

We will soon ensure that everyone is aware of these new responsibilities through a publicity campaign so that residents know how to prevent them from breaking the new law. & # 39;

Fly-tipping has been a growing problem in Coventry – rising from 3,342 incidents in 2016/17 to 4,704 in 2017/18 at the last count in November.

The cost of clearing up the rubbish is no longer registered, but in 2016/17 it is estimated that littering costs the municipality of Coventry more than £ 119,646.

Councils have been informed by the government about how they can use their new powers proportionally, so that clear sanctions should not be used to raise money and should not be spent on minor infringements.

This guideline also says that local authorities should consider whether the householder is a vulnerable person, for example because of age-related poor health or a mental or physical disability.

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