Stray dogs without training instinctively follow gestures and orders from people

Why dogs really are man’s best friend: stray fangs who have never had human interaction instinctively follow gestures and orders from people

  • Researchers studied how stray dogs reacted to human gestures in Indian cities
  • Found that almost half of the homeless animals were too scared to respond
  • But 80 percent of those who correctly followed the human signal
  • Shows dogs can have an innate ability to understand certain human gestures

Teaching a beloved pet to sit, turn and lie down gives him tricks for life, but researchers have discovered that stray dogs can also follow people’s orders.

No training and no known exposure to people does not prevent man’s best friend from understanding simple gestures, a study found.

Researchers who studied stray animals in India discovered that dogs have an innate ability to understand certain human gestures that go beyond training.

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No training and no known exposure to people does not prevent man's best friend from understanding simple gestures, a study found. Researchers discovered that dogs have an innate capacity to understand certain human signals (stock)

No training and no known exposure to people does not prevent man’s best friend from understanding simple gestures, a study found. Researchers discovered that dogs have an innate capacity to understand certain human signals (stock)

They studied stray dogs in different Indian cities, offered two covered bowls and pointed to just one of them.

About half of the dogs did not approach the bowls and the researchers believe that these dogs were anxious and may have had bad experiences with people in the past.

But about 80 percent of the dogs that examined the bowls followed the human signal correctly, suggesting that training is not required to understand gestures.

The results suggest that dogs can understand complex gestures simply by looking at people.

Researchers hope that this can help reduce conflicts between stray dogs and people around the world.

Dogs were domesticated 10,000-15,000 years ago, making them probably the oldest domesticated animals in the world.

People were looking for dogs with the most desirable body shape, personality or appearance for different purposes.

These were then bred together to refine the gene pool and improve the traits.

Dogs that were receptive to orders were ideal and a particularly desirable property.

But it was unclear how far this trait had penetrated the dog psyche and whether it had become innate or still required training.

Teaching a beloved pet to sit, tilt and lie gives them tricks for life, but researchers have discovered that stray dogs can also follow the command of people (stock)

Teaching a beloved pet to sit, tilt and lie gives them tricks for life, but researchers have discovered that stray dogs can also follow the command of people (stock)

Teaching a beloved pet to sit, tilt and lie gives them tricks for life, but researchers have discovered that stray dogs can also follow the command of people (stock)

Dr. Anindita Bhadra of the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, India, and colleagues studied stray dogs in various Indian cities.

“We found it rather surprising that the dogs could follow a gesture that was as abstract as a temporary clue,” Dr. explained. Bhadra out.

“This means that they closely monitor the people they meet for the first time and use their understanding of people to make a decision.

“This shows their intelligence and adaptability.”

“We must understand that dogs are intelligent animals that can coexist with us,” Dr. adds. Bhadra ready.

“They are very capable of understanding our body language and we must give them space.

“A little empathy and respect for another species can reduce many conflicts.”

The research is published in the journal Limits in psychology.

HOW DOGS DOMESTICATE DOGS?

A genetic analysis of the world’s oldest known dog remains showed that in some cases dogs were domesticated by people living in Eurasia, about 20,000 to 40,000 years ago.

Dr. Krishna Veeramah, an assistant professor of evolution at Stony Brook University, told MailOnline: “The process of domesticating dogs would have been a very complex process involving a number of generations where characteristic dog characteristics gradually evolved.

“The current hypothesis is that the domestication of dogs is probably passive, with a population of wolves somewhere in the world living on the edge of hunter-gathering camps that feed on man-made waste.

“Those wolves that were tamer and less aggressive would have been more successful in this, and although people initially did not benefit from this process, they would have developed some sort of symbiotic over time [mutually beneficial] relationship with these animals, eventually evolving towards the dogs we see today. “

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