Stone Age ‘Ravers’ danced 8,000 years ago, with EACH TEETH tied around their bodies

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Stone Age ravers danced in a strange “psychedelic way” with moose teeth tied around their bodies, clattering percussively as they moved, a study has revealed.

A study of 8,000-year-old elk teeth discovered at the Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov cemetery in Russia revealed the unusual dance practice, researchers from Finland say.

Wear marks on the teeth, as well as their location in the graves, indicated that the objects were used as ‘rattles’ rather than a simple ornament.

“Ornaments made up of moose teeth hung or sewn on to clothing make a loud rattling noise when they move,” says the University of Helsinki team.

Wearing the rattlesnakes while dancing made it easier for the Stone Age ravers to immerse themselves in the soundscape, allowing the sound and rhythm to “take control,” they said.

The authors discovered the connection between dancing by examining wear marks on the teeth, then recreating a suit with moose teeth, wearing it for six hours while dancing, and comparing the marks on those teeth to the 8,000-year-old fossils.

Stone Age ravers danced in a strange 'psychedelic way' with moose teeth tied around their bodies, clattering percussively as they moved, a study has revealed

Stone Age ravers danced in a strange ‘psychedelic way’ with moose teeth tied around their bodies, clattering percussively as they moved, a study has revealed

A study of 8,000-year-old elk teeth discovered at the Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov cemetery in Russia revealed the unusual dance practice, researchers from Finland say.  The teeth are sent as black spots around the bones in each grave

A study of 8,000-year-old elk teeth discovered at the Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov cemetery in Russia revealed the unusual dance practice, researchers from Finland say. The teeth are sent as black spots around the bones in each grave

Lead author of the study Riitta Rainio is well versed in the subject of rattler dancing, as she spent six consecutive hours wearing elk tooth ornaments while dancing.

She collaborated with artist Juha Valkeapää to recreate a Stone Age model that she could wear during her dance – held as a performance to find out what kind of wear marks are formed in the teeth when they slam together. and move.

The sound of a tooth ratchet can be crisp and clear or loud and thumping, depending on the number and quality of the teeth, as well as the intensity of the movement, Rainio discovered during the dance.

Microanalysis and mimicking the dance process allowed the team to show that the wear marks in these teeth were the result of dancing.

A study of 8,000-year-old elk teeth discovered in Russia's Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov cemetery revealed the unusual dance practice, researchers from Finland say

A study of 8,000-year-old elk teeth discovered at Russia’s Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov cemetery revealed the unusual dance practice, researchers from Finland say

“Ornaments made up of elk teeth hung on or sewn onto clothing make a loud rattling sound when they move,” says University of Helsinki team

The teeth worn by dancing were analyzed for microscopic traces before and after dancing. These markings were then compared with the findings made by the Russian Academy of Sciences in the graves of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov.

Russian researcher Evgeny Girya documented and analyzed the wear marks in the moose teeth found in four graves chosen for the experiment.

Comparing the chips, cavities, cuts and smooth surfaces of the teeth, he saw a clear resemblance between the teeth worn by dancing and the Stone Age teeth discovered in the tombs.

Wearing the rattlesnakes while dancing made it easier for the Stone Age ravers to immerse themselves in the soundscape, allowing the sound and rhythm to

Wearing the rattlesnakes while dancing made it easier for the Stone Age ravers to immerse themselves in the soundscape, allowing the sound and rhythm to “take control,” they said.

The authors discovered the link between dancing by examining wear marks on the teeth, then recreating a suit with moose teeth, wearing it for six hours while dancing, and comparing the marks on those teeth to the 8,000-year-old fossils.

The authors discovered the link between dancing by examining wear marks on the teeth, then recreating a suit with moose teeth, wearing it for six hours while dancing, and comparing the marks on those teeth to the 8,000-year-old fossils.

However, the marks in the Stone Age teeth were deeper and more extensive, suggesting they were the result of similar activity.

“Since the Stone Age teeth were worn for years or even decades, it’s no surprise that their features are so distinctive,” Girya said.

Kristiina Mannermaa, a researcher from the University of Helsinki, said these findings were very exciting and provide information about Stone Age culture.

Lead author of the study Riitta Rainio is well-versed in the subject of rattle dancing, as she spent six consecutive hours wearing moose-teeth ornaments while dancing

Lead author of the study Riitta Rainio is well-versed in the subject of rattle dancing, as she spent six consecutive hours wearing moose-teeth ornaments while dancing

She collaborated with artist Juha Valkeapää to recreate a Stone Age model that she could wear during her dance - held as a performance to find out what kind of wear marks are formed in the teeth when they slam together. and move

She collaborated with artist Juha Valkeapää to recreate a Stone Age model that she could wear during her dance – held as a performance to find out what kind of wear marks are formed in the teeth when they slam together. and move

“Moose teeth rattles are fascinating because they transport modern humans to a soundscape that is thousands of years old and to the emotional rhythms that drive the body,” says the associate professor.

“You can close your eyes, listen to the sound of the rattlesnakes and drift on the sound waves to a campfire by the lake in the world of the Stone Age hunter-gatherers.”

In Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov’s cemetery, a total of 177 graves of women, men and children have been found, more than half of which contain various ornaments of moose teeth, some consisting of more than 300 individual teeth.

The findings are published in the Cambridge Archaeological Journal.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE STONE AGE?

The Stone Age is a period in human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory.

It begins with the earliest known use of stone tools by hominids, ancient ancestors of humans, during the Old Stone Age – about 3.3 million years ago.

Between about 400,000 and 200,000 years ago, the pace of innovation in stone technology began to accelerate very slightly, a period known as the Middle Stone Age.

At the beginning of this time, hand axes were made with exquisite craftsmanship. This eventually gave way to smaller, more diverse toolkits, with an emphasis on flake tools rather than larger core tools.

The Stone Age is a period in human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory.  This image shows Neolithic jadeite axes from the Museum of Toulouse

The Stone Age is a period in human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory. This image shows Neolithic jadeite axes from the Museum of Toulouse

These toolkits have been established in some parts of Africa by at least 285,000 years, and by 250,000 to 200,000 years in Europe and parts of western Asia. These toolkits last at least 50,000 to 28,000 years ago.

During the Late Stone Age, the pace of innovations increased and the level of craftsmanship increased.

Groups of Homo sapiens experimented with various raw materials, including bone, ivory and antler, as well as stone.

The period, between 50,000 and 39,000 years ago, is also associated with the emergence of modern human behavior in Africa.

Different groups sought their own specific cultural identity and took their own ways of making things.

Later Stone Age peoples and their technologies spread from Africa over the next thousands of years.

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