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The luke worm can be seen turning in the patient, using his suckers to cling to the walls of his organ

Disgusted images show a large parasitic worm spinning in the liver of man after & # 39; he caught it by eating raw watercress & # 39;

  • Liver bones infect the 40-year-old after he ate raw vegetables on a farm in Mexico
  • One was filmed using the suction cups to hold onto the walls of his organ while it was rotating
  • They had caused severe bleeding in his liver that led to severe anemia
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Stomach-churning images have caught a huge parasitic worm around a man's liver.

The unknown 40-year-old is said to have contracted liver fluke after eating raw watercress on a farm in Mexico.

Doctors filmed the creature with the help of his suckers to cling to the walls of his organ as it wriggled around its inside.

The patient was taken to A&E with fatigue, who became increasingly slimmer over the course of the three months.

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He recently moved from Mexico to Los Angeles, where he worked on a farm and regularly grabbed some raw watercress.

Doctors tested the lethargic patient after they noticed he had a pale tongue, mouth, and lips.

They discovered that he had severe anemia – a lack of sufficient healthy red blood cells to transport the necessary oxygen to the tissues of his body.

An ultrasound scan of the patient's abdomen also revealed that his bile ducts, which transport bile from the liver to the intestine, were partially blocked.

An endoscopy performed to find out what caused the blockage revealed large flatworms spinning in his liver.

The luke worm can be seen turning in the patient, using his suckers to cling to the walls of his organ

The luke worm can be seen turning in the patient, using his suckers to cling to the walls of his organ

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The parasitic worms were extracted and identified by doctors as the common liver bone, medically known as Fasciola hepatica.

They infect hosts through the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked freshwater fish and watercress.

After the creatures are taken, they travel from the intestines to bile ducts in the liver where they then live and reproduce.

The patient suffered internal bleeding that led to anemia because of the large number of baby worms that moved through his liver after hatching.

He received a blood transfusion and a cure of triclabendazole, a drug that was specifically used to kill the parasites. It is unclear how many worms were in his body.

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The patient's symptoms disappeared within a month. The story was revealed in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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