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Lime pulls the plug from his electric car sharing service. The transport startup has announced that it will end LimePod on December 31 and not pass any new users on October 14

Starting up transport Lime closes its car sharing service before the end of the year after it has not found the right business partner to use its electric vehicles

  • Lime will end its car-sharing pilot in Seattle on December 31
  • The company says it was difficult to find a business partner to deploy its vehicles
  • The startup stops taking new users to the program after October 14
  • LimePod uses electric cars & the company could not find the right business partner
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Lime pulls the plug from his electric car sharing service.

The transport startup has announced that it will stop LimePod, allowing users to rent cars per minute on December 31 and no new users will pass on October 14.

The service charges users $ 1 to unlock the vehicle and then uses $ 0.40 per minute – gas and insurance are included, making it competitive with other companies that share trips, such as Uber and Lyft.

The pilot program was to be rolled out completely at the end of this year, but Lime could not find the right business partner to deploy a fleet of vehicles.

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Lime pulls the plug from his electric car sharing service. The transport startup has announced that it will end LimePod on December 31 and not pass any new users on October 14

Lime pulls the plug from his electric car sharing service. The transport startup has announced that it will end LimePod on December 31 and not pass any new users on October 14

A spokesperson for Lime said GeekWire that the pilot was meant to test how profitable the company could be in car sharing.

& # 39; The experience is proof of the city's forward-looking position on the future of transportation and the need for sustainable options for citizens & # 39 ;, a Lime spokesperson said in a statement.

& # 39; We are committed to that goal in the same way and the information obtained during our pilot will support the necessary work if we decide to expand and improve this service with a fully electric fleet in the future. & # 39;

Lime did not state whether the program was profitable.

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& # 39; Although the program was a great learning experience, we are first of all an electric mobility company & # 39 ;, Lime said Thursday in an email to LimePod users, according to GeekWire.

& # 39; Like Seattle, we are committed to sustainability, lower CO2 emissions and to making cities more livable, all of which require less driving. & # 39;

The news comes less than a year after the company has released 500 lime brands on the streets of Seattle, Washington.

In addition to car sharing, Lime is known for its brightly colored shared scooters and bicycles that can be found throughout the US.

Despite the unsuccessful attempt at car sharing, a company spokesperson noted that LimePod's riderhood for his other offer is still growing.

Lime said it was closing the LimePod service because it couldn't find a partner to use an electric fleet. However, consumers can still rent one of their electric scooters (see photo), if available
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Lime said it was closing the LimePod service because it couldn't find a partner to use an electric fleet. However, consumers can still rent one of their electric scooters (see photo), if available

Lime said it was closing the LimePod service because it couldn't find a partner to use an electric fleet. However, consumers can still rent one of their electric scooters (see photo), if available

Scale scooters have become very popular all over the world, but a paramedic has warned that the design of the scooter can be a contributing factor in a stream of recent accidents.

Earlier this year, a 50-year-old Australian died after falling off his scooter.

The unidentified man is understood to mean a heart attack and & # 39; traumatic head injury & # 39; as a result of the fall.

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Kalk confirmed to Daily Mail Australia that the electronic scooter on which the man was driving did not malfunction, although Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) clinical director Tony Hucker suggested that a possible wheel design deficiency could have increased the dangers of driving an e-scooter. increase.

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