Stanford Drops Threat to Withhold Law Student Over Satirical Flyer About Capitol Riots

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Stanford University has dropped a threat to withhold a law student’s graduate degree after writing a satirical pamphlet mocking a conservative society about the US Capitol riots.

Nicholas Wallace, 33, is scheduled to graduate from the prestigious California College on June 12, as scheduled.

Wallace’s degree was jeopardized after he posted a satirical flyer for a fake Federalist Society event in which Senator Josh Hawley and Texas AG Ken Paxton were supposedly welcome to speak with the conservative group.

Stanford came under fire after it was revealed that the school withheld Wallace’s diploma and launched an investigation into the fake flyer following complaints from the school’s conservative group, the Stanford Federalist Society.

Wallace had emailed a leaflet to a law school email list on Jan. 25 that parodied the association as well as Hawley and Paxton.

The flyer, titled “The Originalist Case for Inciting Insurrection,” promoted a fake January 6 event and welcomed the two Republicans to speak out about “violent insurgency.”

Nicholas Wallace, 33, (pictured) sent a satirical flyer to a Stanford Law School email list on Jan. 25, parodiing the Federalist Society and the school's Hawley and Paxton.

Nicholas Wallace, 33, (pictured) sent a satirical flyer to a Stanford Law School email list on Jan. 25, parodiing the Federalist Society and the school’s Hawley and Paxton.

Titled

Titled “The Originalist Case for Inciting Insurrection,” it promoted a fake Jan. 6 event inviting Republicans to speak out about “violent insurgency”

Stanford confirmed Wednesday Slate, who first reported the saga that Wallace may graduate and that his satirical email is protected speech.

“The complaint has been resolved as soon as possible and the defendant and complainant have been informed that case law supports that the email is protected speech,” the statement said.

‘That is why and on the basis of the Leonard Act, the university will not proceed with the OCS process and the final diploma holding has been released.’

Wallace also confirmed that the complaint was made in an email to his fellow students.

“In the little time I have left, I hope to work with Stanford to ensure that no more student is subjected to abuse of power in this way,” he wrote.

“PS this email is not a satire,” he added.

While private universities are not required to abide by free speech laws, California’s Leonard Act states that both public and private institutions are protected by the First Amendment.

The Supreme Court has previously ruled that satire falls under the First Amendment as protected speech.

Stanford University reneged on Wednesday on its threat to withhold Wallace's graduate degree because of the incident

Stanford University reneged on Wednesday on its threat to withhold Wallace’s graduate degree due to the incident

In the flyer, Wallace mockingly detailed that the focus of the event would be discussing the merits of a coup and staging a violent uprising to achieve a desired political outcome.

“Violent insurrection, also known as a coup, is a classic system of installing a government,” the leaflet read.

“While it is widely believed to be contrary to the rule of law in every way, violent insurgency can be an effective way to enforce the principle of limited government.”

It continued: “Senator Hawley will argue that the end justifies the means.

Attorney General Paxton will explain that when the Supreme Court refuses to exercise its Article III jurisdiction to nullify the results of free and fair elections, summoning a violent mob to storm the Capitol is an appropriate alternative remedy.

The MAGA riots in the US Capitol on January 6 killed five and left lawmakers running for their lives.  The parody event was dated January 6

The MAGA riots in the US Capitol on January 6 killed five and left lawmakers running for their lives. The parody event was dated January 6

sen.  Josh Hawley

Texas AG Ken Paxton

sen. Josh Hawley (left) and Texas AG Ken Paxton (right) were among those charged with inciting the violent U.S. Capitol uprising on Jan. 6, as they sided with Donald Trump’s false claims about voter fraud and pushed for the presidential election. overthrown

The two Republicans were among those charged with inciting riots in the US Capitol on January 6, when they rallied behind Donald Trump’s false claims of voter fraud and pushed for the presidential election to be reversed.

The flyer was made in the same style as the emails from the Stanford Federalist Society.

It was widely shared on social media and USA Today published an article checking the flyer and confirming it was satire.

Despite the flyer being sent out 19 days after the date of the fake event, and 19 days after the MAGA riot that culminated in five deaths, the Stanford Federalist Society filed a complaint alleging that Wallace’s group, Hawley and Paxton ‘offended’. .

The complaint wasn’t filed until March — two months after the incident and just days after Wallace planned an actual virtual event titled “The Federalist Society’s Connections to the Insurrection” at Stanford.

Despite the flyer being sent 19 days after Jan. 6, the Stanford Federalist Society filed a complaint (above) alleging that Wallace

Despite the flyer being sent 19 days after Jan. 6, the Stanford Federalist Society filed a complaint (above) alleging that Wallace “insulted” the group, Hawley and Paxton.

“Wallace defamed the student group, its officers, Senator Josh Hawley and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton,” it read, claiming people had been “cheated” by the memo.

The Federalist Society then pushed the university again in May to open a formal investigation into Wallace.

Wallace told Slate that he didn’t hear about the complaint until his last day of class on May 27.

He said he was told the school was investigating him for “a possible violation” of the school’s code of conduct and found it would jeopardize not only his graduation but his ability to pass the bar exam. .

Graduates must send their diploma to the Michigan bar upon graduation in order to take the exam in the summer.

Wallace told Slate the pressure had increased in his final days at the school.

Stanford launched a probe and revealed that it was withholding Wallace's diploma because of the fake aviator.  Pictured Wallace

Stanford launched a probe and revealed that it was withholding Wallace’s diploma because of the fake aviator. Pictured Wallace

A Slate journalist tweeted an email from Wallace on Wednesday, also confirming that the complaint has been resolved and that the third-year student will be allowed to graduate on June 12 to schedule.

A Slate journalist tweeted an email from Wallace on Wednesday, also confirming that the complaint has been resolved and that the third-year student will be allowed to graduate on June 12 to schedule.

“It was a pretty awful way to end my career at Stanford,” he said.

“Instead of studying for final exams, I’m trying to figure this out. I just e-mailed my family to reassure them that I didn’t ruin the last few days at Stanford.”

He added that he believed the Federalist Society retaliated against him at the March event, given the timing of the complaint.

The university faced backlash over its handling of the case with critics claiming that satire is free speech protected by the First Amendment.

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) sent Stanford an email this week urging him to “stop his investigation immediately” and said “no reasonable person” would believe the flyer is genuine.

After withdrawing from the investigation, Stanford told Slate it is reviewing its policies, but insisted that it follow procedures at the start of the investigation.

DailyMail.com has reached out to Stanford Law School for comment.

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