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St. Louis lawyer says he took weapons because they feared “the mob” would “kill” them

A Missouri lawyer criticized after he and his wife brandished an AR-15 and a gun as protesters marched to their private St. Louis estate have said his family feared “the mob” would enter the house would kill us, would burn the house down “.

63-year-old Mark McCloskey has spoken out in his defense, claiming it is “ridiculous” to call him a racist for his actions, having spent his career “defending people who are defenseless” and those who ‘need a voice’.

McCloskey occurred to Tucker Carlson Fox news on Tuesday night stating “my black customers love us” and that he and wife Patricia McCloskey, 61, were doing what “I thought I should do to protect my hearth, my home and my family.”

He also appeared on CNNChris Cuomo, who claims he was confronted with “terrorism”.

It came a day after St. Louis attorney Kimberly Gardner, the country’s chief prosecutor, said she was investigating whether to bring charges against the lawyer couple.

63-year-old Mark McCloskey appeared on Fox New on Tuesday to defend his actions with his lawyer Albert Watkins (right)

63-year-old Mark McCloskey appeared on Fox New on Tuesday to defend his actions with his lawyer Albert Watkins (right)

Armed homeowners, Patty and Mark McCloskey, stand in front of their home along Portland Place and confront protesters marching Sunday at the home of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson

Armed homeowners, Patty and Mark McCloskey, stand in front of their home along Portland Place and confront protesters marching Sunday at the home of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson

Armed homeowners, Patty and Mark McCloskey, stand in front of their home along Portland Place and confront protesters marching Sunday at the home of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson

“My wife and I were preparing to eat maybe seventy feet from the gate,” Mark McCloskey told Carlson.

“By the time we looked up and saw the protesters coming over Kings Highway and getting boisterous, we looked over the gate and there is no police there. Our private security was not there. Nobody is there.

“I look at my wife and the gate burst open and all these people come in. And then a stream of people starts to come in, ”he said.

“They are angry, they are screaming, they have saliva from their mouth when they come to the house.”

McCloskey went on to say that after seeing a burning 7/11 without intervention at a protest in the city on June 22, he felt he and his wife had to act and went into the house for a gun and an AR-15 to grab.

“I turned to my wife and said,” Oh my god, we’re absolutely alone. There is no one here to protect us, “he said to Fox.

“When I saw that crowd coming through the gate with their anger and anger, I thought we were going to be swamped like that,” he said.

“By the time I got there with my gun, people were 20 or 9 meters from my front wall. I have a small wall separating the house from my front yard. I was literally scared that in a few seconds they would overcome the wall and enter the house, kill us, burn down the house, and everything I’d worked and struggled for the past 32 years. ‘

“I saw it all go up in flames and my life was destroyed in an instant and I did what I thought I should do to protect my hearth, my home and my family.”

McCloskey spoke to Fox News with his attorney Albert Watkins on Tuesday

McCloskey spoke to Fox News with his attorney Albert Watkins on Tuesday

McCloskey spoke to Fox News with his attorney Albert Watkins on Tuesday

McCloskey claimed that his actions had nothing to do with race and that he didn’t care what race the protesters were in.

“Here’s the interesting thing: I’ve spent my career defending people who are defenseless for those who have a hard time making their oracle happen, for those without a voice,” he continued.

“My black customers love us. On the night this happened, I was called by some of our black customers who told us how wrong it was as the press wrote to us and how wrong it was that we should be portrayed as racist.

“This is what I do for a living. I help people who are down or who need a hand and people who need a voice, ”McCloskey added.

“Calling us racist is ridiculous and it has nothing to do with race. I was not worried about the race [of] the crowd that came through my gate, I was afraid I would be killed. I didn’t care what kind of race they were. ‘

McCloskey also appeared on CNN told host Chris Cuomo that he “protected my wife, my home, my fireplace, my livelihood.”

“My life is ruined,” he added. “It’s called social harassment, it’s called terrorism.”

Chris, what is the definition of terrorism? Using violence and intimidation to scare the public. That happened to me. That’s the damage I suffered. ‘

Patricia McCloskey drew a firearm at protesters as she walked outside her home on Sunday

Patricia McCloskey drew a firearm at protesters as she walked outside her home on Sunday

Patricia McCloskey drew a firearm at protesters as she walked outside her home on Sunday

The couple were featured in multiple videos and photos on Sunday night praising an AR-15 rifle and pistol as protesters marched.

They were the only ones who filed an official police report on the confrontation stating “threats of damage” and police said they would not be charged on Monday.

Still, St. Louis attorney Kim Barley Gardner announced on Monday that she was working with police and prosecutors to investigate the lawyers for potential threats against the crowd.

McCloskeys’s attorney also appeared on Fox News on Tuesday, saying that his clients had not violated the attorney for their actions and should not be charged.

“Given that we have a political animal in the circuit lawyers’ office, there is a risk,” attorney Albert Watkins said of Gardner.

“If the law prevails, the longstanding Missouri law will apply, they’re fine.”

Garner has said she was “alarmed” by Sunday’s events in which “peaceful protesters were met by guns and a violent attack.”

St. Louis prosecutor Kimberly Gardner said she was 'alarmed' that 'peaceful protesters were held up by guns' and that she is investigating the McCloskey couple despite police saying they are the only ones filing a report and that there will be no charges against them

St. Louis prosecutor Kimberly Gardner said she was 'alarmed' that 'peaceful protesters were held up by guns' and that she is investigating the McCloskey couple despite police saying they are the only ones filing a report and that there will be no charges against them

St. Louis prosecutor Kimberly Gardner said she was ‘alarmed’ that ‘peaceful protesters were held up by guns’ and that she is investigating the McCloskey couple despite police saying they are the only ones filing a report and that there will be no charges against them

“We must protect the right to protest peacefully, and any attempt to calm it down through intimidation or the threat of lethal violence will not be tolerated,” she insisted.

“Since hearing about these events this weekend, I have worked with the public and the police to investigate these tragic events.

“Make no mistake, the prosecutor’s office, we will not tolerate the use of force against those who exercise their First Amendment rights, and we will use the full power of Missouri law to hold people accountable,” Gardner warned.

Video of the McCloskeys went viral after being seen aiming the guns at protesters walking past their palatial estate in the wealthy Forest Park area at around 6 p.m. on Sunday.

Protesters were on their way to Mayor Lyda Krewson’s house to demand her resignation after revealing the names and addresses of residents who had proposed firing the police.

The video of the couple’s impasse went viral, with some supporting the couple’s right to protect their private property and others claiming they had broken the law by threatening a peaceful protest.

At one point, the pair seemed to unknowingly aim their weapons at each other while trying to keep protesters away from their home – called the Niemann Mansion.

In the video, protesters chanted “Let’s Go” as the couple paused at their front doors and patroled back and forth.

Although the pair have received support for their actions, they have also had a backlash.

About 300 protesters had gone through a gate to this closed-off community and marched in front of the McCloskey House pictured.  The family said they were dining outside when the protesters arrived

About 300 protesters had gone through a gate to this closed-off community and marched in front of the McCloskey House pictured.  The family said they were dining outside when the protesters arrived

About 300 protesters had gone through a gate to this closed-off community and marched in front of the McCloskey House pictured. The family said they were dining outside when the protesters arrived

The pair are both personal injury attorneys and run the McCloskey Law Center from their extravagant home. The company’s website was taken offline Monday afternoon due to the large influx of emails, and the pair have said they have been forced to enter their office.

Police said on Monday that people in the crowd were yelling threats at the couple and the McCloskeys would not be charged.

They added that they are still investigating, but labeled it a case of offense and assault by harassment against the pair by protesters in the racially diverse crowd.

According to the NRAState law does not prohibit the open carriage of firearms, but does exhibit “any weapon readily capable of lethal use” in the presence of one or more persons in an angry or threatening manner.

Exhibiting a weapon in this manner would likely be a Class D crime for which a prison term of up to four years is imposed and a fine of no more than $ 5,000.

According to the St. Louis Americanhowever, the “castle doctrine” allows people to use deadly force to attack an intruder on their property.

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