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Sports psychology professor explains why Andrew Redmayne’s shootout antics worked for Socceroos

A leading sports psychology professor has explained why there was a method behind Andrew Redmayne’s madness when he helped the Socceroos qualify for the World Cup after beating Peru in a dramatic penalty shootout.

On Twitter, Norway-based Geir Jordet also revealed Redmayne’s bold tactic of acting as the team’s ‘bodyguard’ before Australia’s penalties, an approach he had never seen before on the world stage.

Many eyebrows were raised when Redmayne, 33, replaced captain and first-choice shot-stopper Mat Ryan after 119 minutes, but it turned out to be a masterstroke by coach Graham Arnold.

Redmayne’s almost comical dance routine on the goal line forced a miss and helped him save another from the stunned Peruvians, securing the journeyman, who plays for Sydney FC, a place in Australian sports folklore.

Jordet, a football psychology researcher at the Norwegian School of Sports Sciences, later tweeted a detailed wire explain exactly why Arnold’s huge gamble paid off.

He described several ways Redmayne wanted to control the outcome, be it messing with the mindset of Peruvian players or acting as a ‘bodyguard’ for his Socceroos teammates.

A leading sports psychology professor has explained why there was a method behind Andrew Redmayne's madness when he helped the Socceroos qualify for the World Cup in a penalty shootout (pictured, in action against the South Americans)

A leading sports psychology professor has explained why there was a method behind Andrew Redmayne’s madness when he helped the Socceroos qualify for the World Cup in a penalty shootout (pictured, in action against the South Americans)

Redmayne's almost comical dance routine on the goal line forced one miss and helped him save another from the stunned Peruvians (pictured, with his elated teammates)

Redmayne’s almost comical dance routine on the goal line forced one miss and helped him save another from the stunned Peruvians (pictured, with his elated teammates)

Geir Jordet revealed Redmayne's bold tactic of acting as the team's 'bodyguard' before Australia's penalties, an approach he'd never seen before on the world stage

Geir Jordet revealed Redmayne’s bold tactic of acting as the team’s ‘bodyguard’ before Australia’s penalties, an approach he’d never seen before on the world stage

Jordet thinks some of the tactics were inspired by methods England used during the 2018 World Cup in Russia, especially as Redmayne personally handed the ball to his team-mates before taking their shot at goal.

The reason for this was to provide a familiar and friendly face to ease any nerves.

As Jordet points out, Redmayne was ruthless when it came to his South American rivals. He even offered the ball to Peruvian Alexander Callens before kicking it away for a bit.

“The show of disrespect is clear and obvious,” Jordet said.

He also helped prevent Peruvian goalkeeper Pedro Gallese from playing mind games with the Socceroos taking penalties.

The Australian shot stopper walked with his teammate to the penalty spot, as what Jordet described as a ‘bodyguard’. In one instance, he can be seen pointing at Gallese as if telling him to back up and head back to the goal line.

Redmayne left his best work forever and took forever to stabilize before the decisive penalty.

Seconds later, he saved Alex Valera’s attempt, triggering euphoric scenes as the Socceroos dramatically qualified for a fifth consecutive World Cup.

Jordet labeled penalties a 'psychological game' where Redmayne was a 'mind game master'

Jordet labeled penalties a ‘psychological game’ where Redmayne was a ‘mind game master’

Jordet did his research and showed that Redmayne's antics also worked for Sydney FC in the 2019 A-League grand final against Perth

Jordet did his research and showed that Redmayne’s antics also worked for Sydney FC in the 2019 A-League grand final against Perth

Acting as Australia's 'bodyguard' and showing 'disrespect' to Peru's penalty takers proved decisive

Acting as Australia’s ‘bodyguard’ and showing ‘disrespect’ to Peru’s penalty takers proved decisive

Standing between the sticks for an eternity, Redmayne rattled Alex Valera, whose miss saw Australia qualify for a fifth consecutive World Cup

Standing between the sticks for an eternity, Redmayne rattled Alex Valera, whose miss saw Australia qualify for a fifth consecutive World Cup

“For the final shot, it takes forever for Redmayne to reach the goal line, forcing the referee to delay his whistle and the penalty taker to wait 18 seconds after placing the ball and running back,” Jordet wrote in his thread.

“He has seized control and most likely tipped the odds in his favor.”

Redmayne told SEN Radio that his playing skills were crucial given what was at stake, especially after he was criticized in some parts of Peru for hurling Gallese’s drinking bottle away from the goal.

His rival’s water bottle contained crucial information about the Australian penalty takers.

“If they (Peru) had a water bottle next to the target or in my small area, it would be picked up and thrown into the crowd. It’s a do-or-die moment, it’s us against them,” he said.

“I’ve told a few people that it goes against every moral fiber in my body to be such a person and such an adversary.

“But I knew how much it means to our squad and the game as a whole in Australia.”

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