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Tillie Ryan, a macaw parrot from Hahn, has repeatedly asked the owner to play Peekaboo before he kissed the camera goodnight in Montgomery, Texas

Speaking parrot Tillie Ryan asks the owner to play Peekaboo before he kisses the camera screen & # 39;

  • Hahn & # 39; s Macaw Tillie Ryan sat on her owner's shoulder in Montgomery, Texas
  • In the video, the green-feathered bird asks: & # 39; Do you want to play peek-a-boo? & # 39;
  • If the answer is no, the bird asks it again several times until its owner withdraws
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A cute parrot repeatedly asked the owner to play Peekaboo before he kissed the camera.

Tillie Ryan, a Hahn parrot, sat on her owner's shoulder in Montgomery, Texas.

In the video, the green-feathered bird asks: & # 39; Do you want to play peek-a-boo? & # 39;

Tillie Ryan, a macaw parrot from Hahn, has repeatedly asked the owner to play Peekaboo before he kissed the camera goodnight in Montgomery, Texas

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Tillie Ryan, a macaw parrot from Hahn, has repeatedly asked the owner to play Peekaboo before he kissed the camera goodnight in Montgomery, Texas

Her owner replies: & # 39; No, I don't want to play peekaboo. & # 39;

Tillie Ryan asks again and her owner repeatedly refuses the offer.

Ultimately, her owner says: & # 39; No, it's time to & # 39; to go at night. & # 39;

When Tillie asks Ryan three more times, her owner admits and says: & # 39; OK, peekaboo! & # 39;

Tillie Ryan asks again and her owner repeatedly refuses the offer

Tillie Ryan asks again and her owner repeatedly refuses the offer

Ultimately, her owner says: & # 39; No, it's time to & # 39; to go at night & # 39;

Ultimately, her owner says: & # 39; No, it's time to & # 39; to go at night & # 39;

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Tillie Ryan asks again and her owner repeatedly refuses the offer. Ultimately, her owner says: & # 39; No, it's time to & # 39; to go at night & # 39;

The footage then cuts to Tillie Ryan, who moves her head back and forth and says & # 39; peekaboo & # 39 ;.

Her owner replies: & # 39; No, I don't play peekaboo. & # 39;

A bewildered Tillie Ryan replies: & # 39; No? & # 39;

Her owner asks: & # 39; Do you want & # 39; go at night? Tell everyone & # 39; night night & # 39 ;. & # 39;

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She then instructs the bird to blow & # 39; kisses & # 39 ;.

The footage then cuts to Tillie Ryan who moves her head back and forth before she & # 39; peekaboo & # 39; says

The footage then cuts to Tillie Ryan who moves her head back and forth before she & # 39; peekaboo & # 39; says

Her owner replies: & # 39; No, I don't play peekaboo & # 39;

Her owner replies: & # 39; No, I don't play peekaboo & # 39;

The footage then cuts to Tillie Ryan who moves her head back and forth before she & # 39; peekaboo & # 39; says. Her owner replies: & # 39; No, I don't play peekaboo & # 39;

The bird leans towards the camera and blows two kisses on the lens.

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This is not the first time that a talking parrot becomes a nuisance to its owner.

In December last year, Rocco accidentally placed the parrot on Amazon by chatting with voice-activated personal assistant Alexa.

The African Gray & # 39; bought & # 39; a range of fruits and vegetables – including watermelons, raisins and broccoli – ice cream, a light bulb and even a kite.

Her owner then instructs the bird to blow & # 39; kisses & # 39 ;. The bird leans towards the camera and blows two kisses on the lens

Her owner then instructs the bird to blow & # 39; kisses & # 39 ;. The bird leans towards the camera and blows two kisses on the lens

Her owner then instructs the bird to blow & # 39; kisses & # 39 ;. The bird leans towards the camera and blows two kisses on the lens

In December last year, Rocco accidentally placed the parrot on Amazon by chatting with voice-activated personal assistant Alexa
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In December last year, Rocco accidentally placed the parrot on Amazon by chatting with voice-activated personal assistant Alexa

In December last year, Rocco accidentally placed the parrot on Amazon by chatting with voice-activated personal assistant Alexa

How do parrots talk?

Important structural differences in the brains of parrots compared to other birds can explain their ability to imitate sounds.

Parrots are one of the few animals that act as & # 39; vocal students & # 39; considered meaning that they can imitate sounds.

In addition to defining centers in the brain that control vocal learning, "cores", parrots have what the scientists call "shells" or outer rings that are also involved in vocal learning.

The shells are relatively larger in species of parrots that are known for their ability to imitate human speech.

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