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SpaceX simulation video shows what the first Crew Dragon mission will look like

SpaceX simulation video shows what the first Crew Dragon mission will look like when the capsule is ‘physically ready’ to launch to the international space station in 2020

  • SpaceX shared a simulation video of the first flight of the Crew Dragons to space
  • The capsule is set to bring a human crew to the international space station
  • Falcon 9 rocket will launch the capsule in orbit every two divorce
  • The capsule will then slide to the ISS where it will make a few journeys around the earth
  • CEO Elon Musk said the capsule will be ready in February and then undergo tests

The mission may not start until next year, but SpaceX has shared a simulated video of the first Crew Dragon trip to the international space station ISS.

The clip highlights the crew aboard the capsule, the countdown to the explosion and the separation of the Falcon 9 rocket before it attaches itself to the US space station.

CEO Elon Musk noted that the Crew Dragon capsule should be ‘physically ready’ in February, but added that it will probably take a few months to complete critical safety tests.

The Crew Dragon was destroyed in April during a failed test during the activation of the SuperDraco drive system.

Musk now hopes to get some excitement before he unveils the new capsule that will be launched to the international space station ISS in 2020.

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The mission may not start until next year, but SpaceX has shared a simulated video of the first Crew Dragon trip to the international space station

The mission may not start until next year, but SpaceX has shared a simulated video of the first Crew Dragon trip to the international space station

The two-minute video begins with the crew boarding the capsule, igniting the Falcon thrusters and firing the rocket into space.

As soon as the rocket enters orbit, the capsule breaks away and slides to the ISS.

After a few journeys across the earth, the dragon returns safely to the earth.

Last month, SpaceX shared a video to its Twitter account with the Dragon capsule that completed a crucial test of its parachute.

In the test, the capsule was dropped from an airplane and landed safely with only three of the four parachutes.

The clip highlights the crew going aboard the capsule, the countdown to explosion and the separation of the Falcon 9 rocket before it attaches itself to the US space station

The clip highlights the crew going aboard the capsule, the countdown to explosion and the separation of the Falcon 9 rocket before it attaches itself to the US space station

The clip highlights the crew going aboard the capsule, the countdown to explosion and the separation of the Falcon 9 rocket before it attaches itself to the US space station

The two-minute video starts with the crew boarding the capsule, igniting the Falcon thrusters and firing the rocket toward space

The two-minute video starts with the crew boarding the capsule, igniting the Falcon thrusters and firing the rocket toward space

The two-minute video starts with the crew boarding the capsule, igniting the Falcon thrusters and firing the rocket toward space

The Falcon 9 rocket will orbit the capsule before it disengages and falls back to earth

The Falcon 9 rocket will orbit the capsule before it disengages and falls back to earth

The Falcon 9 rocket will orbit the capsule before it disengages and falls back to earth

The drop was intended to simulate Crew Dragon’s ability to navigate Crew Dragon to Earth in the event that one of the four main parachutes did not work.

According to SpaceX, the test went 13 consecutive times without problems.

For SpaceX, the test marks an important step after an explosion during tests by Crew Dragon in April that engulfed the empty capsule in fire and smoke.

The incident was caused by a leaky part and completely destroyed the capsule – a glitch that contributed to SpaceX’s delayed timeline for Crew Dragon, which it is developing for NASA.

As soon as the rocket enters orbit, the capsule breaks away and slides to the ISS

As soon as the rocket enters orbit, the capsule breaks away and slides to the ISS

As soon as the rocket enters orbit, the capsule breaks away and slides to the ISS

After a few journeys across the earth, the dragon returns safely to the earth. Last month, SpaceX shared a video to its Twitter account with the Dragon capsule that completed a crucial test of its parachute

After a few journeys across the earth, the dragon returns safely to the earth. Last month, SpaceX shared a video to its Twitter account with the Dragon capsule that completed a crucial test of its parachute

After a few journeys across the earth, the dragon returns safely to the earth. Last month, SpaceX shared a video to its Twitter account with the Dragon capsule that completed a crucial test of its parachute

CEO Elon Musk noted that the Crew Dragon capsule should be 'physically ready' in February, but added that it will probably take a few more months to complete critical safety tests

CEO Elon Musk noted that the Crew Dragon capsule should be 'physically ready' in February, but added that it will probably take a few more months to complete critical safety tests

CEO Elon Musk noted that the Crew Dragon capsule should be ‘physically ready’ in February, but added that it will probably take a few more months to complete critical safety tests

These delays recently caught the fire of NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine, who held a joint conference with SpaceX CEO Elon Musk after insulting the company on Twitter.

“I’m focused on returning to realism when it comes to costs and schedules,” said the NASA administrator.

“So I pointed out – and I did it not only with SpaceX but with all our contractors – that we need more realism built into the development timelines.”

WHAT IS SPACEX ‘CREW DRAGON CAPSULE?

The test of 2 March, the first launch of American astronauts on American soil in eight years, will inform the system design and operations (artist's impression)

The test of 2 March, the first launch of American astronauts on American soil in eight years, will inform the system design and operations (artist's impression)

The test of 2 March, the first launch of American astronauts on American soil in eight years, will inform the system design and operations (artist’s impression)

The capsule measures approximately 20 feet long by 12 feet in diameter, and can carry up to 7 astronauts at a time.

The Crew Dragon has an advanced emergency flight system (which was tested earlier this year) to quickly bring astronauts to safety if something should go wrong, with roughly the same G-forces as a ride in Disneyland.

It also has an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) that provides a comfortable and safe environment for crew members.

The Crew Dragon screens provide real-time information about the status of the spacecraft’s capabilities and show everything from Dragon’s position in space to possible destinations to the on-board environment.

Those CRS-2 Dragon missions will use ‘propulsive’ landings, with the capsule landing on a runway using its SuperDraco bow thrusters instead of splashing into the ocean.

That gives NASA faster access to the cargo returned by that spacecraft, and also builds up experience for propulsive landings of Dragon spacecraft with crew.

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