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SpaceX is postponing its fifth launch of Starlink satellites back to Sunday due to bad weather in Florida

SpaceX has reduced its fifth launch of Starlinks due to bad weather.

The company announced that although the static firing of its Falcon 9 rocket is complete, the next batch of 60 satellites will only go into low orbit on Sunday – the first launch was scheduled for Saturday.

The mission starts at 10:25 AM EST from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and the weather is now 90 percent good for taking off.

If everything goes according to plan, this batch will bring the total Starlink constellation to 300 – putting the company on the right track to have 1500 satellites in a low orbit by the end of 1500.

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SpaceX announced on Twitter that although the static fire of its Falcon 9 rocket is complete, the next batch of 60 satellites will only go into low orbit on Sunday - the first launch was set for Saturday

SpaceX announced on Twitter that although the static fire of its Falcon 9 rocket is complete, the next batch of 60 satellites will only go into low orbit on Sunday – the first launch was set for Saturday

SpaceX plans to launch thousands of satellites to radiate broadband around the world.

If everything stays on schedule for the constellation, 100 or more Starlink launches could take place in the future.

If the company can reach 1500 this year, it will be able to open access to North America.

The company has already received approval to launch 12,000 of its satellites, but is waiting for another 30,000 to be authorized.

Sunday launch starts at 10:25 AM EST from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and the weather is now 90 percent good for taking off. If everything goes according to plan, this launch will bring the total Starlink constellation to 300

Sunday launch starts at 10:25 AM EST from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and the weather is now 90 percent good for taking off. If everything goes according to plan, this launch will bring the total Starlink constellation to 300

Sunday launch starts at 10:25 AM EST from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and the weather is now 90 percent good for taking off. If everything goes according to plan, this launch will bring the total Starlink constellation to 300

However, the mission has caused a great deal of commotion among the astronomy community, since the 242 already in orbit around the night sky stand in the way of important scientific observations.

However, the mission has caused a great deal of commotion among the astronomy community, since the 242 already in orbit around the night sky stand in the way of important scientific observations.

However, the mission has caused a great deal of commotion among the astronomy community, since the 242 already in orbit around the night sky stand in the way of important scientific observations.

Because how close the devices are to the earth, it is necessary that thousands of devices float in low orbit to cover the world with internet.

WHY ARE EXPERTS STARLINK?

Many astronomers have said that the hundreds of satellites are already blocking scientific observations.

The satellites reflect light and make it difficult for experts to view the night sky.

In addition, orbiting satellites can also interfere with the operation of ground-based radio telescopes that experts use to see farther-away phenomena.

However, the mission has caused a great deal of commotion among the astronomy community, since the 242 already in orbit around the night sky stand in the way of important scientific observations.

The development is seen as a new headache for researchers who already have to find solutions to deal with objects that hide their images of the deep space.

In addition, orbiting satellites can also interfere with the operation of ground-based radio telescopes that experts use to see farther-away phenomena.

“The night sky is a commons – and what we have here is a tragedy of the commons,” astrophysicist Dave Clements of Imperial College London told the BBC.

The proposed constellations, he added, “present a foreground between what we observe from the earth and the rest of the universe.”

“So they stand in the way of everything. And you miss what’s behind them, whether it’s a potentially dangerous asteroid in the neighborhood or the farthest quasar in the universe. “

The orbit satellites orbiting the Earth can also interfere with the operation of radio telescopes on the ground that experts use to see distant phenomena. A group of Starlinks is packed and ready to go to a low job

The orbit satellites orbiting the Earth can also interfere with the operation of radio telescopes on the ground that experts use to see distant phenomena. A group of Starlinks is packed and ready to go to a low job

The orbit satellites orbiting the Earth can also interfere with the operation of radio telescopes on the ground that experts use to see distant phenomena. A group of Starlinks is packed and ready to go to a low job

In particular, the satellites will pose a threat to large-scale sky surveys, such as Chile’s planned Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

“What we want to do with LSST and other telescopes is to make a real-time film of how the sky changes,” explains Dr. Clements.

“Now we have these satellites that interrupt sightings, and it is as if someone is flashing a flashlight every now and then.”

However, it seems that these concerns and complaints have not fallen on deaf ears, because SpaceX is currently testing a satellite that is covered with a dark coating that is said to be made of anti-reflective material, which should reduce the glare of today’s satellites .

Laura Forczyk, a space analyst, said the effectiveness of the measures is still uncertain.

“SpaceX hasn’t reassured astronomers about the reflectivity of their Starlink satellites,” she told AFP.

“The real test will be the days after the launch when the smallsats are close together and at a lower height before they rise to their last job.”

“Astronomers and stargazers can compare the brightness of this current series of smallsats with earlier versions.”

WHAT IS STARLINK AND WHAT ARE THE GOALS?

Elon Musk’s SpaceX has launched the fourth series of its ‘Starlink’ space internet satellites – bringing the total to 240.

They form a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide cheap broadband internet services from a low orbit around the earth.

The constellation, colloquially known as Starlink, and under development at the SpaceX facilities in Redmond, Washington.

The goal is to beam super fast internet into your house from space.

Although satellite internet has been around for a while, it is suffering from high latency and unreliable connections.

Starlink is different. SpaceX says that placing a “constellation” of satellites in a low orbit around the globe would provide fast, cable-like internet around the world.

The billionaire company wants to create the global system to generate more money.

Musk said earlier that the company could give three billion people who currently have no access to the Internet a cheap way to get online.

It can also help fund a future city on Mars.

Helping humanity to reach the red planet is one of Musk’s long-established goals and was what inspired him to start SpaceX.

The company recently submitted plans to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch 4,425 satellites orbit above the Earth – three times as many currently in use.

“Once fully implemented, the SpaceX system passes almost all parts of the Earth’s surface and can therefore in principle provide ubiquitous global service,” the company said.

“Every point on the Earth’s surface will see a SpaceX satellite at all times.”

The network will provide internet access to the US and the rest of the world, it added.

It is expected to take more than five years and $ 9.8 billion (£ 7.1 billion) in investment, although satellite internet has proven to be an expensive market in the past and analysts expect the final bill to be higher.

Musk compared the project to “rebuilding the internet in space,” because it would reduce dependence on the existing network of submarine fiber optic cables that traverse the planet.

In the US, the FCC welcomed the scheme as a way to provide more people with internet connections.

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