SpaceX fires Starship SN11’s Raptor engines before the rocket flies to high altitudes TODAY

0

SpaceX is gearing up to launch its fourth Starship prototype, following a successful Raptor static burn test that emits a burst of flames from the base of serial number 11 (SN11), indicating it is ready to take off.

The pre-check test ensures that the massive rocket’s three engines are ‘healthy’ for the journey after one failed to meet required specifications for launch during a previous test this week – the failed engine was swapped out for a new unit on Wednesday .

The district judge of Boca Chica, Texas, where SpaceX’s test facility is located, approved road closures around the beach and Highway 4 on March 26 from 8:30 AM ET to 8:30 PM ET for the possible first high-altitude flight of SN11.

“If members of the public want to see the flight, do so at a safe distance and away from Boca China Beach,” District Judge Eddie Treviño wrote in a statement about the road closure.

SpaceX’s agenda is to send SN11 six miles into the sky, soar above Earth, then turn on its side for the infamous ‘belly flop’ before reorienting to land.

This will be the company’s fourth Starship owned by Elon Musk to make the journey, but those tuning into a live stream may wonder if it will suffer the same fate as its predecessors – the three previous missiles ended the journey. mission in a fireball.

SpaceX is gearing up to launch its fourth Starship prototype, following a successful Raptor static burn test that emits a burst of flames from the base of serial number 11 (SN11), indicating it is ready to take off.

SpaceX is gearing up to launch its fourth Starship prototype, following a successful Raptor static burn test that emits a burst of flames from the base of serial number 11 (SN11), indicating it is ready to take off.

The Raptor’s engine test began early Friday morning with the aim of ensuring the new unit was operational.

At around 1:00 a.m.ET on March 24, SpaceX quietly rolled the Raptor SN64 to the launch pad to replace another that had failed in previous tests.

While the company has not announced what caused the engine to fail, it is suggested that a launch delay of several days after a successful initial static fire test may be possible Monday.

However, the last static fire test seemed to go as planned and now SN11 is waiting patiently on the launch pad for its first trip off the ground.

The district judge of Boca Chica, Texas, where SpaceX's test facility is located, approved road closures around the beach and Highway 4 on March 26 from 8:30 am ET to 8:30 pm ET for the possible first high-altitude flight of SN11

The district judge of Boca Chica, Texas, where SpaceX's test facility is located, approved road closures around the beach and Highway 4 on March 26 from 8:30 am ET to 8:30 pm ET for the possible first high-altitude flight of SN11

The district judge of Boca Chica, Texas, where SpaceX’s test facility is located, approved road closures around the beach and Highway 4 on March 26 from 8:30 am ET to 8:30 pm ET for the possible first high-altitude flight of SN11

The Raptor’s engine test began early Friday morning with the aim of ensuring the new unit was operational. At around 1:00 a.m. ET on March 24, SpaceX quietly rolled the Raptor SN64 to the launch pad to replace another that had failed previous tests

The Starship is made of stainless steel, which is 50 meters high, and features a nose cone and flaps on the side.

Each missile launched was tasked with gathering data in flight to better improve the next.

However, all three that flew earlier detonated after descending back to Earth.

The Starship is made of stainless steel, which is 160 feet long, and is equipped with a nose cone and side flaps

The Starship is made of stainless steel, which is 160 feet long, and is equipped with a nose cone and side flaps

The Starship is made of stainless steel, which is 160 feet long, and is equipped with a nose cone and side flaps

SN8 took to the skies on December 10, marking the first high-altitude attempt of a spaceship prototype.

The missile hit all points, including turning off the Raptor engines, reaching an altitude of 12.5 kilometers, and performing the belly flop.

The only thing it couldn’t perfect was the landing, but Musk previously said the missile was unlikely to land safely.

The moment the missile landed, it ignited in flames, leaving nothing but its nose cone.

Then came the next prototype, SN9, which SpaceX hoped to land when it attempted its high-altitude test flight in February.

SN8 took to the skies on December 10, marking the first high-altitude attempt of a spaceship prototype. The only thing it couldn’t perfect was the landing, but Musk previously said the missile was unlikely to land safely – it exploded on impact

Then came the next prototype, SN9, which SpaceX hoped to land when it attempted its high-altitude test flight in February, but this prototype also exploded.

Then came the next prototype, SN9, which SpaceX hoped to land when it attempted its high-altitude test flight in February, but this prototype also exploded.

Then came the next prototype, SN9, which SpaceX hoped to land when it attempted its high-altitude test flight in February, but this prototype also exploded.

This time, the missile was unable to maneuver into the upright position before landing on the launch pad, making it unable to hold the landing

This time, the missile was unable to maneuver into the upright position before landing on the launch pad, making it unable to hold the landing

This time, the missile was unable to maneuver into the upright position before landing on the launch pad, making it unable to hold the landing

This time, the missile was unable to maneuver into the upright position before landing on the launch pad, making it unable to hold the landing.

It landed in a deafening crash and exploded in bright orange flames and a cloud of dust, but the fire did not spread.

However, it was SN10 that shocked the world.

The massive missile exploded about 10 minutes after landing on the launch pad after its initial peak, with some suspecting that a methane leak was to blame.

The failure occurred after SpaceX declared it a success as SN10 flew, flipped and landed without crashing and burning like the previous SN8 and SN9 prototypes – CEO Elon Musk praised the rocket in a tweet for ‘landing in one piece’ .

“The third time is a charm, as the saying goes,” John Insprucker, SpaceX’s chief integration engineer, said during SpaceX’s livestream on March 3.

“We had a successful soft touchdown on the landing pad covering a beautiful test flight of Starship 10.”

Some sources speculate that the landing legs attached to the base were not deployed, causing the missile to overturn and crush the pipes with methane.

The force of the explosion was enough to send the body of the large rocket – which had tilted slightly to one side after landing -, causing it to flip and land on its side to the ground.

However, it was SN10 that shocked the world.  The massive missile exploded about 10 minutes after landing on the launch pad after its initial peak, with some suspecting that a methane leak was to blame.

However, it was SN10 that shocked the world.  The massive missile exploded about 10 minutes after landing on the launch pad after its initial peak, with some suspecting that a methane leak was to blame.

However, it was SN10 that shocked the world. The massive missile exploded about 10 minutes after landing on the launch pad after its initial peak, with some suspecting that a methane leak was to blame.

An object that could be a methane tank was seen lying on the Boca Chica landing area after the fire and smoke from the massive explosion cleared.

However, SN10 was able to complete its mission to collect data on the missile piloting on its return, and many called the launch a success rather than another Starship failure.

In the past year alone, SpaceX has completed two low-altitude flight tests with SN5 and SN6 and more than 16,000 seconds of run time while starting the ground engine.

Musk recently drafted an ambitious plan to get humans to Mars by 2023 – 10 years before NASA plans to land astronauts on the Red Planet.

And Starship missiles are key players in making that dream come true.