Space station crew to inspect mysterious hole on spaceship Soyuz

The six-hour spacewalk of Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev started at 1600 GMT, according to a live broadcast by Roscosmos.

Two Russian cosmonauts have come outside the international space station today to inspect part of a Russian spacecraft where a small hole was discovered.

The mysterious leak was discovered on 30 August in the Russian Soyuz vessel that is attached to the ISS.

Initially it was thought that it was caused by a small meteorite and astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small pressure drop.

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The six-hour spacewalk of Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev started at 1600 GMT, according to a live broadcast by Roscosmos.

The six-hour spacewalk of Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev started at 1600 GMT, according to a live broadcast by Roscosmos.

Now the two astronauts have confirmed that the hole is safe – and the vessel will be reused.

After more than five hours of a rare broadcast, in which the cosmonauts were shown in space by cutting an insulating object of the spacecraft with a knife, they discovered the exterior part of the hole, originally discovered in the internal shell of the capsule, and took samples of the outer insulation.

In accordance with the instructions from the control center, they also took pictures of the outside of the hole.

Find the hole ... Cosmonauts reveal the thermal insulation that covered the patched hole and take samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all.

Find the hole ... Cosmonauts reveal the thermal insulation that covered the patched hole and take samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all.

Find the hole … Cosmonauts reveal the thermal insulation that covered the patched hole and take samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all.

& # 39; It's time to go home, & # 39; said a voice from the control center shortly before the cosmonauts began to return to the space station.

As the investigation continued, however, it began to look like the hole was made of someone inside, as opposed to outside, either back on earth or in space, claimed the Russian space agency.

A leading theory of an unnamed source at Energia, which produced the Sozus, said the hole was made on the ground – possibly caused by & # 39; intentional failure & # 39 ;.

The upcoming spacewalk by Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kononenko and Sergei Prokopyev will be unprecedented by their complexity & # 39 ;, Russia's space agency Roscosmos, Chief Dmitry Rogozin, wrote on Twitter

The six-hour spacewalk of Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev started at 1600 GMT, according to a live broadcast by Roscosmos.

"Sergey, how are the timescale? & # 39; a vote from the control center asked them after an hour.

We work, work quietly, & # 39; replied Prokopyev.

The crew reveals the thermal insulation that covers the patched hole and takes samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all

The crew reveals the thermal insulation that covers the patched hole and takes samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all

The crew reveals the thermal insulation that covers the patched hole and takes samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all

The & # 39; micro-break & # 39; reportedly about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion ($ 115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a pressure drop that allowed air to rush out of the space station.

The & # 39; micro-break & # 39; reportedly about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion ($ 115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a pressure drop that allowed air to rush out of the space station.

The & # 39; micro-break & # 39; reportedly about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion ($ 115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a pressure drop that allowed air to rush out of the space station.

They reveal the thermal insulation of the patched hole and take samples that are studied by experts to solve the mystery once and for all.

The & # 39; micro-break & # 39; reportedly about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion ($ 115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a pressure drop that allowed air to rush out of the space station.

The crew on board quickly settled and sealed the opening with epoxy, which temporarily solved the problem.

Space officials said the station remained safe to operate until further investigation was conducted.

Two Russian cosmonauts venture outside the international space station today (artist's impression) to inspect part of a Russian spacecraft where a small hole has been spotted

Two Russian cosmonauts venture outside the international space station today (artist's impression) to inspect part of a Russian spacecraft where a small hole has been spotted

Two Russian cosmonauts venture outside the international space station today (artist's impression) to inspect part of a Russian spacecraft where a small hole has been spotted

One committee will try to identify the perpetrator by name, said Roscosmos CEO Dmitry Rogozin, calling this a "case of honor & # 39; for the Russian space company Energia.

Initially, experts had suggested that the hole was caused by a small stone that struck the space station and caused the damage.

& # 39; This leak appears to be the result of a micrometeoroid effect, tweeted ISS veteran Scott Kelly in a representative tweet.

However, Russian reports in which anonymous sources are mentioned show that the problem could have existed from the moment the Soyuz capsule was launched to dock at the International Space Station.

The crew quickly settled and sealed the small hole that caused a slight pressure drop. Space officials said the station has remained safe to operate. Oleg Kononenko and Sergei Prokopyev will do a six-hour spacewalk to inspect the exterior of the Soyuz today

The crew quickly settled and sealed the small hole that caused a slight pressure drop. Space officials said the station has remained safe to operate. Oleg Kononenko and Sergei Prokopyev will do a six-hour spacewalk to inspect the exterior of the Soyuz today

The crew quickly settled and sealed the small hole that caused a slight pressure drop. Space officials said the station has remained safe to operate. Oleg Kononenko and Sergei Prokopyev will do a six-hour spacewalk to inspect the exterior of the Soyuz today

WHAT CAN HAVE CAUSED A HOLE IN THE ISS?

Theory one – it was caused by a small meteorite

A small hole appeared in a Russian space capsule concluded on August 30 for the ISS.

The & # 39; micro-break & # 39; which reportedly was about 2 mm wide in the $ 150 billion (£ 115 billion) space station was discovered after astronauts noticed a drop in pressure.

The astronaut of the European space agency, Alexander Gerst, allegedly had his finger crossed before the crew patched it with tape.

The gap was confirmed restored by Friday (August 31) after the cabin pressure returned to normal.

Initially it was thought that it was caused by a small meteorite and astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small pressure drop.

Theory two – it was deliberately made in orbit around the earth

As the investigation continued, however, it began to look like the hole was made of someone inside, as opposed to outside, either back on earth or in space, claimed the Russian space agency.

Roscosmos chef Dmitry Rogozin said in September that the hole could have been drilled during production or in a job with a "wavering hand."

He did not say whether he suspected one of the American crew members, but the statement led to some bewilderment.

Sources suggest that the question of how to repair the gap may have strained relations between Moscow and Houston.

Rogozin has since abandoned his statement in which he blamed the media for turning his words and said that he never 'pointed' the American astronauts.

Theory three – it was caused by a worker at Energia

A leading theory of an unnamed source at Energia said that the hole was made on the ground – possibly caused by 'intentional interference' & # 39; – with suggestions that the responsible person may already have identified.

Another anonymous source said the hole was drilled by an employee who hid their mistake with a seal instead of reporting it.

An unnamed source at Energia told the Russian news agency RIA Novosti that & # 39;