Soldiers build six tents in Fort Bliss to hold migrants

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The United States military has built six tents at the Fort Bliss Army base in Texas that can each accommodate up to 1,000 migrants – but soldiers should not be allowed to photograph the camp during the border crisis.

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters, were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to house unaccompanied migrants amid an influx arriving at the US-Mexico border.

Officials have declined to say how many migrants are currently being held at the military base, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month that the Fort Bliss facility could house about 5,000 beds.

No official photos of the Fort Bliss Emergency Intake Shelters have been released so far.

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters, were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to provide for unaccompanied migrant children amid an influx of those arriving at the US-Mexico border.  Photo courtesy of CBS4

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters, were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to provide for unaccompanied migrant children amid an influx of those arriving at the US-Mexico border. Photo courtesy of CBS4

Officials have declined to say how many migrants are currently being held at the military base, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month that the Fort Bliss facility could house about 5,000 beds.  Photo courtesy of CBS4

Officials have declined to say how many migrants are currently being held at the military base, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month that the Fort Bliss facility could house about 5,000 beds.  Photo courtesy of CBS4

Officials have declined to say how many migrants are currently being held at the military base, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki said last month that the Fort Bliss facility could house about 5,000 beds. Photo courtesy of CBS4

Sources told Fox news that soldiers at the army base have been ordered not to take pictures of the tents.

The only images of the tents made public come from two lawmakers who have visited Fort Bliss over the past two weeks to inspect the shelter shelters.

The six tents can be seen in the background of photos posted to Twitter by Democrat Veronica Escobar and Republican Rep. Tony Gonzales.

Those same sources said there were plans to set up more tents in the future to accommodate more migrants.

The tents set up so far came after the Department of Health and Human Services received approval from the Pentagon last month to house unaccompanied migrant children on the military base.

The Biden government has struggled in recent weeks to house and process an increasing number of unaccompanied children at the border, who are supported for days at overcrowded border stations and processing centers.

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters (pictured above) were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to provide for unaccompanied migrant children amid an influx of those arriving at the US-Mexico border.

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters (pictured above) were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to provide for unaccompanied migrant children amid an influx of those arriving at the US-Mexico border.

The tents, officially called Emergency Intake Shelters (pictured above) were set up at Fort Bliss in El Paso last month to provide for unaccompanied migrant children amid an influx of those arriving at the US-Mexico border.

The only images of the tents made public come from two lawmakers, Democrat Veronica Escobar, who has been visiting Fort Bliss for the past two weeks to inspect the shelter shelters.

The only images of the tents made public come from two lawmakers, Democrat Veronica Escobar, who has been visiting Fort Bliss for the past two weeks to inspect the shelter shelters.

The only images of the tents made public come from two lawmakers, Democrat Veronica Escobar, who has been visiting Fort Bliss for the past two weeks to inspect the shelter shelters.

No official photos of the Fort Bliss Emergency Intake Shelters have been released so far

No official photos of the Fort Bliss Emergency Intake Shelters have been released so far

No official photos of the Fort Bliss Emergency Intake Shelters have been released so far

The shelter system in which the children are housed has been overwhelmed and the Ministry of Health and Human Services has come in to open the emergency shelters.

New government statistics released last week showed that 171,000 migrants were caught at the border by US authorities in March – the highest monthly total in two decades and the latest sign of the growing humanitarian challenge facing President Joe Biden.

The total includes about 19,000 unaccompanied migrant children and 53,000 family members traveling together, the preliminary figures showed.

The March provisional arrests at the US-Mexico border represent the highest monthly level since April 2000, when border security officers arrested more than 180,000 migrants.

Separately, two Yemeni citizens who were placed on the FBI’s terror watch list were arrested in California after crossing illegally from Mexico.

Migrants are crossing the Rio Bravo River to present themselves in El Paso, Texas on March 30

Migrants are crossing the Rio Bravo River to present themselves in El Paso, Texas on March 30

Migrants are crossing the Rio Bravo River to present themselves in El Paso, Texas on March 30

Migrant children play at the border fence in Tijuana, Mexico on April 2

Migrant children play at the border fence in Tijuana, Mexico on April 2

Migrant children play at the border fence in Tijuana, Mexico on April 2

Migrants board a van at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission, Texas on Sunday

Migrants board a van at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission, Texas on Sunday

Migrants board a van at the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church in Mission, Texas on Sunday

The two unnamed men, aged 33 and 26, were held in the Calexico area of ​​California for the past three months.

The recordings were made by US Customs and Border Protection agents assigned to El Centro Station.

CBP said in a statement Monday that the two men were on a US government watch list for terrorism suspects and were also on a ‘no-fly’ list.

“Part of the Border Patrol’s mission is to protect the country from terrorists,” said Chief Patrol Officer Gregory K. Bovino.

“These fears at our border illustrate the importance of our mission and how we can always remain vigilant in our daily mission to protect this great country.”

Republicans criticizing Biden’s border response have previously warned that terrorists may be among those who enter illegally and evade detection.

The US government does not release data on terrorist arrests along the border with Mexico.

A 33-year-old Yemeni citizen was one of two men who, despite being on the FBI's terror suspect list and `` no-fly, '' were arrested by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in California for trying to get out of Mexico illegally. to cross to the United States.

A 33-year-old Yemeni citizen was one of two men who, despite being on the FBI's terror suspect list and `` no-fly, '' were arrested by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in California for trying to get out of Mexico illegally. to cross to the United States.

A 26-year-old man from Yemen, who is on the FBI's terrorism suspect and on a 'no-fly' list, was intercepted on March 30 by CBP agents assigned to the El Centro Station in Calexico, California. after he tried to illegally enter the United States from Mexico

A 26-year-old man from Yemen, who is on the FBI's terrorism suspect and on a 'no-fly' list, was intercepted on March 30 by CBP agents assigned to the El Centro Station in Calexico, California. after he tried to illegally enter the United States from Mexico

A 33-year-old Yemeni citizen was one of two men who, despite being on the FBI’s terror suspect list and “ no-fly, ” were arrested by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in California for trying to get out of Mexico illegally. to cross to the United States.